Table Talks

 

 

On Monday 5th December at 5pm we’ll be online with the table set for an intriguing Advent treat.

Dr Will Bowers (QMUL) will introduce his new research on the dynamics of eighteenth-century dining circles, and Dr Heber Rodrigues from the UK Centre for Excellence on Wine Research will be exploring the cultural contexts of wine appreciation.

All are welcome. Please register by following this link.

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Image: Claude Pratt, ‘Still Life of Newspaper, Pipe, Decanter, and Jar’ (1935, Birmingham Museums Trust)

Welcome Drinks and Research Exchange

Monday 3 October 2022, 5pm, UoB Arts Building 224

A chance to get together as the academic year begins.

Whether you’re a regular Arts of Place contributor or new to Birmingham and interested in finding out more, please do come along for this special in-person version of our ‘Monday Conversation’ series. Lucy Shaw (History of Art) and Jon Stevens (English) will be among those giving brief talks about their current work. No booking required: just drop in between 5 and 6 to share your place-related interests, meet other researchers, and enjoy a drink. 

Trees of History

Tuesday 5th July 5.45pm – 7.30pm, Barber Institute of Fine Arts. The £3 ticket includes a drink. BOOK HERE

An evening of readings and discussion in the Barber Gallery, inspired by the exhibition Taking Root.

With Flora Kay, Gillian Wright, Tom Kaye, Alexandra Harris and Jessica Fay

In response to the arboreal work of artists from Gaspard Dughet to JMW Turner, this event will consider some of the writers who shaped ideas about trees in seventeenth, eighteenth and nineteenth-century Britain. Their powerful imaginative responses illuminate the past and give us new perspectives on the present. After a welcoming drink and tour of the prints on display, we’ll consider the work of tree-thinkers including John Evelyn, who advocated tree planting in the 1660s, and William Cowper, who thought a single oak tree was fit subject for poetic biography.

All levels and abilities are welcome. This talk, is open to anyone 18+ and will be held at the Barber Institute of Fine Arts. Limited spaces, so booking is essential.

Speakers: Flora Kay is Learning and Engagement Manager at the Barber Institute Gillian Wright is the author, most recently, of The Restoration Transposed: Poetry, Place and History, 1660-1700. Jessica Fay is a scholar of Romanticism and currently writing about relations between poetry and Dutch painting. Tom Kaye is writing a doctoral thesis on forestry in American literature. Alexandra Harris is the author of Weatherland, Time and Place, and is finishing a book on rural history and local feeling.

“Where heaves the turf in many a mouldering heap…”

The Place of the Churchyard

Monday Conversation, 30 May 2022, 5-6pm, online. Please register here for the zoom link.

The meanings and resonances of churchyards are multiple and deep. They are a sanctuary of peace at the centre of the community; a focus for local history; a place for prayer, mourning and memorialization. In the eighteenth century they inspired a group of poets looking for new ways to connect with the land and with the past.

Join us for a discussion of exciting new research on churchyards, history and poetry. Ruth Abbott (Cambridge) will take us beyond and behind Thomas Gray’s Elegy, introducing the poet’s unpublished Commonplace-Book notes on historical graveyards, tombs, and sepulchres. James Metcalf (King’s) will offer a new reading of Robert Blair’s The Grave as a piece of land work.  

Daisy Hay: Stories of Romantic Birmingham

Joseph Priestley, Joseph Johnson, Ruins and Riots

Arts of Place and Oxford Centre for Life-Writing Annual Lecture

Tuesday 3 May, 5.30pm GMT
University of Birmingham, Arts Building Lecture Room 3 (R16 on this campus map). Lecture followed by drinks reception.

Please register here.

We are delighted that Daisy Hay (University of Exeter) will give the second OCLW and Arts of Place Annual Lecture. Daisy’s new book, Dinner with Joseph Johnson, is an extraordinary account of writing, publishing, and friendship in a revolutionary age — and Birmingham is central to the story. 

If you’re new to Birmingham, or haven’t visited the campus before, you’ll find there’s lots to explore so you might want to make an afternoon of it. Trains from New Street stop at ‘University’ station, bringing you right to the gate (walk straight in past the Paolozzi sculpture). Stroll through the park-like ‘Green Heart’ and explore the collections at the Barber Art Gallery (open until 5 on Tuesdays). In the Arts Building, you’ll find Peter Lanyon’s fine mural from 1963 – and signs to the lecture room.

Songs of Spring

Monday Conversation 25 April 2022, 5-6pm online.

With Bethan Roberts and Francesca MacKenney

Bethan Roberts is the author of Charlotte Smith and the Sonnet (Liverpool University Press, 2019) and her new book Nightingale has recently been published in Reaktion’s ‘animal’ series.

Bethan’s talk is called ‘Sweet harbinger(s) of spring’: Placing the cuckoo and nightingale in poetry‘, and it will consider the traditional poetic rivals the nightingale and cuckoo. Bethan will think about the significance of place and its different meanings in poems on these spring migrants, from matters of habitat and distribution to poetic feeling and beloved ‘pleasant places’.

Francesca MacKenney is the author of Birdsong, Speech, and Poetry: The Art of Composition in the Long Nineteenth Century (forthcoming in 2022 with Cambridge University Press). The book explores what poetry can do and say in comparison with birdsong and music.

Francesca’s talk will explore ‘Birdsong in the Poetry of John Clare‘.

Watch a recording of Francesca’s and Bethan’s talks here: Songs of Spring

On Place Value

Monday Conversation 7 February 2022, 6-7pm online. Register here.

Paul Nash, ‘Thirlmere’, 1914.

Why do we value the land? Is it for agriculture and the production of food? For harbouring rich biodiversity? Or for the beauty of the landscape and the opportunity for recreation? These long-debated questions and interests gained urgency at the COP26 climate conference in Glasgow but what role can literature and the arts play in determining the answers?  

We have two exciting speakers joining us for a discussion of Place Value:

Dr Christopher Donaldson (Lancaster University) reflects on the racial politics inherent in representations of the British countryside, focusing on the English Lake District;

Dr Pippa Marland (University of Bristol) considers the emergence of a ‘new georgic’ in farm writing of the twenty-first century.

All welcome!

Tobacco and Feathers… The Art of Looking


Arts of Place is supporting an exciting evening’s conversation at Trinity College Oxford (Monday 8 November 6pm) and an online version with live discussion (Monday 15 November). BBC New Generation Thinkers Lauren Working and Lucy Powell discuss art, literature, and colonialism with art historian Stephanie Pratt. This event is part of the 2021 Being Human Festival.

The event at Trinity College is now fully booked, but please do register for the online version on Monday 15 November 6 – 7.15pm. A film of the panel talks and conversation will be screened, followed by live discussion with the online audience. Book here: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/being-human-festival-transatlantic-tales-stories-of-feathers-and-smoke-tickets-179205748217?aff=erelpanelorg

Please note that unfortunately Alexandra Harris is unable to chair this event, but Lauren and Lucy will take her place in hosting the conversation.


How do you read a feather? How did tobacco, a plant cultivated by Indigenous peoples in the Americas, end up in the playhouses of Shakespeare’s London? How were transatlantic objects altered or incorporated into ‘new’ worlds?


From parrots to sunflowers to chilis, plants and animals from the Americas have reconfigured cultures across the world for over four centuries. This event will examine objects that crossed the Atlantic in the early modern period, illuminating their place in everything from still life paintings to botanic gardens to the writings of the seventeenth-century playwright Aphra Behn. Drawing on literature, art history, and Indigenous perspectives, Lauren Working, Lucy Powell and Stephanie Pratt will follow the journeys of feathers and tobacco to discuss the ongoing impact of colonialism and empire on society and culture in England.