AIM (Advanced Inter-Disciplinary Models)

A Doctoral Training Partnership (DTP) funded by the MRC between three Partners – Universities of Birmingham, Leicester and Nottingham – and three more Associate Partners – the Research Complex at Harwell, Mary Lyon Centre and Rosalind Franklin Institute.

About us

The research projects that PhD students within AIM undertake use cutting-edge, inter-disciplinary research methods to create and interrogate innovative models of disease. As part of the partnership, AIM PhD students work with complex data, cell-based models, model organisms and patients to better understand areas of clinical need such as metabolic and infectious diseases, cancer, chronic inflammatory conditions and respiratory disease, and psychological disorders.

We strongly support and encourage an open and inclusive environment within the DTP, in which all students are welcome and supported to fulfil their potential. The training students receive within the DTP provides skills that will catalyse their future career ambitions – whether in research or beyond.

What does AIM offer?

As a student within the AIM DTP, you will be provided with a stipend to support living costs and your tuition fees will be covered for the duration of the PhD – 4 years. Due to funding stipulations set by UKRI, we are able to recruit up to 30% of international applicants to the cohort each year.

You will join a cohort of students across the three academic partners, with whom you will undertake a 3-month training frontload while getting started on the research project you applied for.

An integrated support network including the DTP leadership team, your supervisors, the local university support structures and AIM student representatives will be on hand to provide guidance, mentorship and support throughout your PhD.

You will be trained in both technical skills for your research project, generic research skills and transferable skills, so that at the end of your PhD you have the tools that you can use for the next step in your career.

Students engaging in team building activities at the Raymond Priestley Centre.