Roundtable on Islam in U.S. Politics

A representative of the Council on America-Islamic Relations (CAIR) took part in a roundtable discussion on _Islam in American Politics’ in Washington DC. CAIR’s Nihad Awad joined former Ambassador Akbar Ahmed, Georgetown President John J. DeGioia, and Muslim Congressman Keith Ellison, John Esposito, and others to deepen the dialogue on critical religious and political issues. Georgetown University and the World Economic Forum sponsored the discussion. It marked the official US launch of the first Islam and the West: Annual Report on the State of the Dialogue.

Europe wary of Muslim immigrants, poll says

Europeans believe immigration from Islamic countries is a threat to their traditional way of life, a survey has suggested. The poll, carried out across 21 countries, warned that Europe’s Muslim population could treble in the next 17 years. It also reported “a severe deficit of trust is found between the Western and Muslim communities” with most people wanting less interaction with the Muslim world. The study, whose authors include the former Archbishop of Canterbury Lord Carey, was commissioned for leaders at the World Economic Forum meeting in Davos, Switzerland. It reported “a growing fear among Europeans of a perceived Islamic threat to their cultural identities, driven in part by immigration from predominantly Muslim nations”. It concluded: “An overwhelming majority of the surveyed populations in Europe believe greater interaction between Islam and the West is a threat.” Backbench Tory MP David Davies whipped up the hysteria by reportedly claiming he was “not surprised” by the polls findings.http://www.themuslimweekly.com/newsdetails/fullstoryview.aspx?NewsID=175A874CC95B7A1BB87D06EF&MENUID=HOMENEWS&DESCRIPTION=UK%20News

World Economic Forum Report Ranks Islam and West Relations

The World Economic Forum, in collaboration with Georgetown University, has launched the Islam and the West: Annual Report on the State of Dialogue. This first of its kind report is a systematic and thorough overview of how Muslim and Western societies perceive and relate to each other at the political, social, economic and cultural levels.

Muslims, West see divisions deepening

Most people in Muslim and Western countries believe divisions between them are worsening and each side believes the other disrespects their culture, according to a poll released. The Gallup poll, published in a report on Muslim-Western relations for the World Economic Forum (WEF) in Davos this week, reflects “an alarmingly low level of optimism regarding dialogue between Islam and the West”, WEF chairman Klaus Schwab said. Negative perceptions were most prevalent in the United States, Israel and the Palestinian Territories, partly because of violence in Iraq five years after the US-led invasion and because of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, the report said. “In all but two countries surveyed…a majority believed the interaction between Western and Islamic communities is getting worse,” Schwab said of the poll, which questioned around 1,000 people in each of 21 countries.