Student gets 40 years for terror campaign against Muslims

October 25, 2013

A white supremacist terrorist who stabbed a grandfather to death and bombed mosques in an effort to trigger a racial war on Britain’s streets has been jailed for life. Ukrainian student Pavlo Lapshyn, 25, was told he would not even be considered for release until his minimum tariff of 40 years was served. The judge did not impose a whole-life sentence, which the prosecution had requested.

Lapshyn’s campaign began in April 2013, just five days after his arrival from Ukraine, where he had won a prize to gain work experience in Britain. Lapshyn found Mohammed Saleem, 82, going home after praying at his local mosque. The student approached him from behind and plunged a hunting knife into him three times with such force that one wound went through to his front. After Saleem’s murder, Lapshyn started placing homemade explosives outside mosques on Fridays, the main day of Muslim prayer.

The device he planted in July, which had 100 nails wrapped around it to maximise the carnage, was aimed at worshippers at the Tipton mosque, where 300 were people were expected to attend prayers. Prayers that particular Friday were held an hour later, thus avoiding mass casualties. The device was so powerful it left nails embedded in tree trunks, police said.

Devices had also been placed outside mosques in Walsall and Wolverhampton.

Assistant Chief Constable Marcus Beale, the head of the West Midlands police counter-terrorism unit, said Lapshyn had shown no remorse or regret and describing the 40-year term as extremely lengthy.

The Guardian:

http://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2013/oct/25/ukranian-white-supremacist-murder-mosque-bombs-pavlo-lapshyn

http://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2013/oct/25/student-40-years-terror-campaign-muslims

Government accused of ‘double standards’ in aftermath of Woolwich murder of Drummer Lee Rigby

The Government has been accused of double standards in the way it responded to the murder of Drummer Lee Rigby compared to the killing of an 82-year-old Muslim and explosions at three mosques in the West Midlands. Although the stabbing of Mohammed Saleem in Birmingham in April is regarded by police as a terrorist incident, Labour is concerned that it has not been discussed by the task force on extremism set up by David Cameron after the Woolwich killing in May. That was followed by explosions at mosques in Walsall, Tipton and Wolverhampton.

 

Yvette Cooper, the shadow Home Secretary, has written to Theresa May, the Home Secretary, recalling that Mr Cameron said the task force would look at new ways to support local communities and take a united stand against all forms of extremism. She added: “Like others, I had assumed the Prime Minister’s task force for tackling extremism would engage seriously with the West Midlands communities concerned. Its purpose was to ask questions about attacks, what more we can do to prevent extremism and to protect our communities. Clearly it needs to cover terror attacks on Muslim communities as well as Islamist extremism. So I think it’s really important the Taskforce considers these attacks and engages with the community now.”

 

Replying to Ms Cooper, the Home Secretary said: “These are of course terrible crimes which have the potential to cause fear and resentment across communities and we must continue to make clear that we will not tolerate extremism which attempts to divide us.”

 

The Security Minister acknowledged that there was “some fear and concern” in the community. He said: “Specialist advisers have been giving security advice to mosques, Islamic schools and community centres and there have been increased police patrols and community engagement plans.”

Suspected bomb found near Wolverhampton mosque

A suspected bomb has been found near a Wolverhampton mosque, making it the third explosive device targeting Muslims in the West Midlands in a month. Police said traces of an explosion and debris consistent with a detonation were found close to Wolverhampton Central Mosque on Friday. Two Ukrainian engineering students aged 22 and 25 respectively on work placements at a hi-tech computer company were being questioned yesterday after police revealed they had uncovered evidence of a third bombing close to a mosque in the West Midlands.

 

Police evacuated streets near the Wolverhampton Central Mosque on Thursday night after receiving information about “a possible device activation”.

 

An officer had spotted and arrested one of the men in Small Heath, Birmingham, which led to the arrest of the second man nearby and the sealing off of roads for searches to be carried out by bomb disposal teams. The pair were being held on suspicion of being involved in the commission, preparation or instigation of an act of terrorism. The arrest of the two men was followed by searches of their home and work addresses on Thursday afternoon.

 

“The investigation is being led by specialist officers and staff from our counter-terrorism unit who are being supported by a range of departments from across the force.

Terror police investigating nail bomb attack at mosque

The homemade device exploded near the Kanz Ul Iman Masjid mosque in Tipton, West Midlands, shortly after 1pm – when up to 200 worshippers would normally have been in the area for Friday prayers. However, the prayers had been moved back an hour because of Ramadan and no one was injured in the blast. The bomb, which was left on a disused railway line behind the mosque, showered the area with nails and other debris. Police were last night treating the explosion as a terrorist incident and were investigating whether there are any links to a small explosion near a mosque in nearby Walsall last month.

 

Residents in Tipton believed the attack had also been timed to coincide with the day of the funeral of Drummer Rigby in Bury. The soldier died in an alleged Islamic terror attack in Woolwich, east London, in May. Adrian Bailey, the local MP, said: “Given that it is Drummer Lee Rigby’s funeral today and previous attacks at mosques across the country, it certainly seems that this may have been connected in some way.” A nail bomb had exploded shortly after 1pm, when the mosque is usually at full capacity, but fortunately, as it is Ramadan, prayer times have changed and the devastation and potential loss of life that may have been suffered was avoided.

 

“People were evacuated and a cordon was put in place while officers worked with the army bomb disposal experts and specialist officers and it’s likely that this is an attack given the factors and evidence found already. This includes the loud bang, reports of smoke, the finding of nails and the location of a mosque. From this, we can draw the most likely conclusion that there was a serious explosion and that somebody sought to create a devastating amount of damage. The police are treating this as a terror attack, but we are still working to establish if this is connected to any other incidents that have occurred.”

Man, 75, arrested after home-made bomb found near Walsall mosque

A 75-year-old man has been arrested on suspicion of causing an explosion likely to endanger life or damage property after a home-made bomb exploded near a mosque. West Midlands police said the man was arrested at his home in Walsall on Thursday afternoon by detectives from the counter-terrorism unit. He has been taken to a police station in the West Midlands for questioning. Officers are searching his home address as part of the investigation into the home-made explosive, the remains of which were found in an alleyway adjoining the Aisha Mosque and Islamic Centre in Rutter Street, in the Caldmore area of Walsall.

 

Anyone with information which may aid the investigation is asked to contact West Midlands police on 101 or Crimestoppers anonymously on 0800 555 111.

Police call home-made bomb outside Walsall’s Ashia Mosque a ‘hate crime’ and draft in counter-terror police

Counter-terror police have been called in to assist with a major hate crime investigation after a small home-made bomb that had exploded near a mosque was discovered on Saturday night. Around 150 people were evacuated from their homes, and 80 had to stay in temporary accommodation in the Walsall area on Saturday night to allow bomb disposal experts to make the device safe. West Midlands Police confirmed the blast heard by residents on Friday “appeared to be consistent” with the device exploding. No one was injured and the device caused minimal damage. The device was discovered in an alleyway adjoining the Aisha Mosque and Islamic Centre in Rutter Street.

 

Assistant Chief Constable Sharon Rowe said on Sunday evening: “The force is taking this attack against the mosque very seriously and we have a major investigation under way. “To that end, I have called in support from all over the force, including the West Midlands Counter Terrorism Unit, which has a number of experts supporting the inquiry. She added: “At this stage we are keeping an open mind on a motive, but have recorded it as a hate crime.”

 

The mosque had been a part of the community for more than 40 years and held strong relations with communities of all faiths, often holding open days for non-Muslims. Councillor Zahid Ali, portfolio holder for public health and protection, said the community was standing together “shoulder to shoulder” in support of the police. “Walsall has really shown its mettle in coming together and responding with calm determination.”

Bomb disposal experts are called to mosque in Walsall after suspicious item discovered

Police examining a suspicious item found in a Walsall mosque have confirmed they are treating the incident as a hate crime. A police spokesperson said an explosion was heard by residents on Friday evening. On Saturday, the item was discovered by a member of the public and handed into the police. Superintendent Keith Fraser, the head of crime and operations for Walsall Police, said the incident was being treated as hate crime but the motive for placing the item near a mosque remained unclear.

 

Army experts ordered the evacuation of nearly 40 homes near the Rutter Street mosque in Walsall, West Midlands Police said. “We have launched a full investigation into the suspicious item that has been found, and what’s going to be the key to this is the public’s help in relation to helping us to understand why that suspicious item was in the area. ”So if anybody saw anything over the weekend I’d like them to call police on 101 or Crimestoppers  0800 555 111 .”

 

Officials from Walsall Council are working closely with the emergency services to support local people and minimise disruption in the area. Zahid Ali, Cabinet Member for Public Protection at Walsall Council, also spoke outside the mosque. Describing the incident as “unfortunate”, Mr Ali added: “It’s absolutely wonderful to see that the communities have come together supporting the residents, and most of those residents are now back in their homes.”

 

Zia Ul-Haq, who acts as a spokesman for the mosque and also sits on its committee, said: “First of all can I thank the police force and the local council for really supporting us on this occasion.

‘Hero’ police officer stabbed at mosque is discharged from hospital

The police officer heralded a hero after being stabbed in the chest and stomach while he disarmed a knife-wielding attacker at a mosque is to be discharged from hospital. The 31-year-old officer was brutally attacked when he responded to an incident in Birmingham where a man who had brandished a knife was shouting “don’t mock Islam” and attacking worshippers. The alleged attacker was arrested on suspicion of attempted murder and remains at a secure mental health unit after doctors deemed him unfit to be interviewed, West Midlands Police have confirmed.

 

Commenting on an official West Midlands Police Twitter account, the unidentified injured officer said: “Consultant has been in to see me this morning. Op went great. Will be discharged later today.” In the comment posted in the early hours of this morning, he also thanked medics and people at the mosque for their help during the incident last weekend, adding: “It means a lot to know the community has our backs.” Chief Superintendent Alex Murray, speaking yesterday, said there was nothing to suggest the incident was a hate crime, or that it was connected with other similar incidents in the wake of Drummer Lee Rigby’s death in Woolwich, south east London.

 

A 28-year-old man stabbed in the arm during the attack and a 36-year-old man who was stabbed once in the thigh remain in hospital in a stable condition, while a third man who suffered a hand injury is recovering at home.

Three men and a police officer treated in hospital after stabbing at mosque

Three men and a police officer are being treated in hospital after they were stabbed at a mosque, West Midlands Police have confirmed today. A 32-year-old man is now being questioned on suspicion of attempted murder, police said. Initial reports suggest an argument may have taken place inside the mosque prior to the attack. The male police officer was attacked after being called to attend reports that three men had been stabbed at the mosque in the Ward End area of Birmingham. All four men are described as in a stable condition. Mohammed Shafiq, the leader of national Muslim organisation the Ramadhan Foundation, said a nearby resident overheard an argument coming from inside the mosque and believes the attack followed a dispute between members. Officers were today conducting patrols in the area surrounding the mosque to reassure local residents. A cordon is in place while investigations continue at the mosque. Police are investigating whether the attack was a hate crime.

 

Islamist gang of six jailed for at least 18 years each for plotting bomb attack on EDL rally

Six Islamist extremists have been jailed for a total of more than 100 years for plotting a gun and bomb attack on an English Defence League rally that could have sparked spiralling communal violence in Britain. The Islamist extremists planned a bomb and gun attack on an English Defence League rally in the knowledge that it would spark a tit-for-tat spiral of violence, a court heard. The plot to bomb the rally in Dewsbury, West Yorkshire, in June last year failed only because of a mixture of incompetence and chance after the plotters turned up late. One of their cars was then impounded following a traffic check on their way home. The bungling group had planned the attack for eight weeks, including research to find the telephone number of the EDL’s leader Tommy Robinson and tracking the location of EDL rallies. The Old Bailey heard that it had planned “terrible vengeance” on the EDL for what it saw as blasphemous words and actions against Islam.

 

The six men being sentenced, all from the West Midlands, admitted planning the attack in April 2012. Jewel Uddin, 27, Omar Mohammed Khan, 31, and Zohaib Ahmed, 22, were jailed for 19-and-a-half years. Mohammed Hasseen, 24, Anzal Hussain, 25, and Mohammed Saud, 23, were given jail terms of 18 years and nine months.

 

All of the men except Hasseen travelled to Dewsbury on the day of the rally but arrived at around 4pm, while the event had finished earlier than expected, at 2pm. They were armed with two shotguns, swords, knives, a nail bomb containing 458 pieces of shrapnel, and a partially assembled pipe bomb.

 

As they drove home to Birmingham, one of their cars was pulled over by police because a plotter failed to fill out an online application form properly and the car showed up as having no insurance. The weapons were found several days later along with declarations of war addressed to the “kafir (non-believer) female and self-proclaimed Queen Elizabeth” and David Cameron. The plotters were rounded up by West Midlands officers after a huge anti-terrorism operation.

 

Bobbie Cheema QC, prosecuting, told the court: “They intended to bring about a violent confrontation with the EDL during which they intended to use weapons to cause serious injuries and they anticipated, each one of them, that some victims may have died.”

Mr Robinson briefly watched proceedings from the public gallery of the Old Bailey and called out “God Save the Queen” when the sentences were announced. Outside, police stepped up security as dozens of EDL members gathered at a pub close to the court. One man was held on suspicion of being drunk and disorderly.