Muslim Lawyer Defends UK Sharia Tribunals

4 June 2012

London based lawyer Sadakat Kadri called upon the British public to give a chance to sharia tribunals. In his speech, delivered at the annual Hay Festival in Wales, he highlighted the importance of the tribunals in terms of solving the problems of the Muslim community, especially the women. Kadri stressed that if the tribunals do not operate, then the process will take place behind closed doors and thus lack the crucial element of transparency.

He also clarified some of the misconception about sharia.

Cardiff’s Muslim Community Commemorates their Leader

13 May 2012

 

Yemeni sailors were some of the oldest Muslims who migrated to the UK more than a century ago. They mostly dwelled around Cardiff and opened the first mosque in the city as late as 1860. The Muslim community in the city is well established and formed strong community ties with the host Welsh.

 

Their religious ceremonies are welcomed by the non-Muslim groups and their century old annual procession had been dubbed by the wider community as a “Muslim Christmas”. The Muslim community has now decided to revive their annual procession for the memory of late Sheikh Said Hassan Ismail, founder of South Wales Islamic Centre.

Controversies over Funeral Prayers for Bin Laden

04.05.2011, 05.05.2011
The radical cleric Anjem Choudary, known supporter of Osama Bin Laden and former leader of the outlawed Islamist group al-Muhajiroun, announced he would lead a funeral prayer for Bin Laden outside the US Embassy in London on Friday. He called on fellow extremist to join the public prayer and demonstrations against the killing of Bin Laden. Further, he warned of potential domestic terror attacks following Bin Laden’s death. Similarly, the exiled radical preacher Omar Bakri has called for funeral prayers in front of US Embassies around the world. Bakri has condemned the killing of Bin Laden and warned the West of heavy retaliation by Al Qaeda. Britain, like other Western countries, has advised the public to remain alert to the threat of Al Qaeda.

On Friday, then, hundreds of Bin Laden supporters gathered outside the US Embassy in London and protested against the killing of Bin Laden. Concurrently, in Cardiff, a group of approximately 25 Muslims has held a funeral prayer for Bin Laden. Welsh Islamic leaders have, however, condemned the group for holding the funeral prayer. The Muslim Council for Wales and Riverside, for instance, described the group as “publicity-seekers”

Police in Terror Plot Meeting with Muslim Community

24 December 2010

Police have met Muslims at a Cardiff mosque to discuss the arrests of five men in the city suspected of terrorism offences. Properties across Cardiff have been searched by officers after dawn raids on Monday, when 12 arrests were made in total across the UK.

Police met community leaders at the Jalalia Mosque and Islamic Education Centre in Riverside, Cardiff, on Friday. Saleem Kidwai, of the Muslim Council of Wales, welcomed the visit, and said: “The chief inspector came in the mosque and talked to the community just to reassure them that we are all in this together and we have to deal with this together,” he said.

Prince Charles praises British Muslims for their “selflessness”

The Prince of Wales has praised the “energy, dynamism and selflessness” of British Muslims. He attended the 25th anniversary dinner of the charity Islamic Relief, in the Grosvenor House Hotel in central London, which he acknowledged helped to bring together people of different faiths.

The Prince said: “We hear rather too much misleading information about a small minority of your community and not nearly enough about the vastly more numerous acts of compassion and commitment which characterize the work of Islamic Relief and its supporters.”

Religion in the British army

Muslim and Sikh recruits training in the British Army say their faith is not an issue, but at times it can present them with a few dilemmas. “If I was out in Afghanistan in uniform I would be shot at right away, as the Taliban would not know who I was or my Muslim background,” says Akhtar Hussain. “So for me, it’s who shoots first.”

The 19-year-old British Muslim from Brighton joined the Princess of Wales’ Royal Regiment seven weeks ago and is currently undergoing a 26-week training program at Vimy Barracks in Catterick. He says his faith does not really affect his army training, and the attitude to British Muslims at the barracks is positive. “They cater for my needs and if I want to pray or observe Ramadan I can,” says Private Hussain. Halal food is also provided for.

But when Pte. Hussain finishes training, he might be posted on a tour of duty in Iraq and Afghanistan – and he is aware British Muslims joining the army has become a contentious issue. “Obviously coming from my background, it plays on my mind. I may end up in this situation but I don’t think religion comes into it, it’s more about terrorism.”

Seen and Not Heard: Voices of Young British Muslims

Much is written about young British Muslims, but what do young Muslims themselves say about the lives they live?

A major new study of Britain’s Muslim youth published today argues that young Muslims clearly see themselves as British, but also feel let down in several ways by a society that misreads them – but wastes no time in speaking about them. “Seen and Not Heard: Voices of Young British Muslims”, by Sughra Ahmed, is the result of 18 months of rigorous research across England, Scotland and Wales listening to and analyzing the voices, feelings and aspirations of young people from across the UK.

The report enables female and male voices to express, in their own words, their outlook and how they feel they are perceived, scoping topical issues such as inter-generational challenges, identity, gender, religious teachings, mosques, policing and the media.

Sughra Ahmed, author of the report commented, “We are used to hearing about young Muslims in the context of radicalization of Muslim opinion, but their lives are far more complex. They feel a strong sense of patriotism, but also feel let down by voices that do not do justice to their aspirations. Young people are comfortable in negotiating their multiple identities, but some also feel a sense of disconnection from older generations as well as pressure from a society that increasingly stereotypes young people.”

The findings in this report challenge both British society and the Muslim community to do more to connect with young people and their latent talents. It makes a number of recommendations to policymakers, statutory services and Muslim communities, including better and more informed outreach programs to connect with young people; the need for greater investment in young people to develop their capacity and to create leaders and role models; and the need for initiatives that help bridge inter-generational gaps within the Muslim community.

In the Foreword to the report, the Rt. Rev. Tim Stevens, Bishop of Leicester and Chair of the Children’s Society writes: “As this report suggests, much is written about young Muslims but we rarely seem to actually hear their voices. This report goes a long way to rectifying this issue so that young Muslim voices are heard and valued…”

“Seen and Not Heard: Voices of Young British Muslims” provides valuable insight into some of the more pertinent questions asked by policy makers, statutory services and community institutions concerning a new generation positioned to make its impact on society.

Notes

1. The author of the report, Sughra Ahmed, is a Research Fellow at the Policy Research Centre. She can be reached at 07800 900 252, or sughra@policyresearch.org..uk.

2. The average Muslim in Britain is 28 years old (13 years below the national average age); nearly half of all Muslims are below the age of 25; one third are aged 16 or younger.

3. Muslims aged 16 to 25 and from 15 different ethnicities took part in 9 focus groups in England, Scotland and Wales — 45 percent of those who took part were young women.

4. The Policy Research Centre, based at the Islamic Foundation, specializes in research, policy advice and training on issues related to British Muslims.

5. The report can also be downloaded at www.policyresearch.org.uk.

Welsh Tories bid for Muslim vote

Welsh Tories are making an attempt to bring the country’s Muslims into their fold. In the past, these communities have mostly seen the Labour Party as their natural home but this is now changing, Welsh Conservative leader Nick Bourne told the inaugural meeting of the Welsh Conservative Forum in Cardiff. “Following our landslide defeat in 1997, the Conservative Party recognised that it had to change,” Mr Bourne said. “If we were to regain power, we had to become more representative of the people we wanted to serve in government. A party capable of representing all Britain and all Britons. “On his election as Leader, David Cameron promised to reach out to minority ethnic communities and to recognise the contribution immigrants have made to our prosperity and culture. “And I am determined that we should do so in Wales as well. I believe the Welsh Conservative Muslim Forum marks an important milestone on the road to increasing Conservative engagement with the Muslim community. “In many ways, Muslim values are Conservative values. We all believe in strong families, in enterprise, in self reliance and in individual responsibility.http://themuslimweekly.com/newsdetails/fullstoryview.aspx?NewsID=054C955ED77D541133E1926D&MENUID=HOMENEWS&DESCRIPTION=UK%20News

Youth need more time to integrate – Muslim leader

Scotland’s first Muslim youth development officer has called for changes to the intensive after-school system of teaching school children about Islam, amid fears that it leaves them with little time to integrate with their non-Muslim peers. Faisal Hussein, 27, last week took up the full-time role with the government-backed Scottish Islamic Foundation (SIF) and his aim is to support and extend the support for young Muslims by working with community groups and mosques. Hussein will launch a study into the provision of Madressahs – the Islamic voluntary-run education system – after conceding the intensive after-school lessons led by imams at mosques and family homes leave young people with too little time for community activities which are a key part of integration. Around 10,000 Scottish youngsters are estimated to attend the projects with a further 60,000 in England and Wales, between the ages of five and 16. Community leaders believe the teachings, which involve learning the Qur’an, help develop children into model citizens while maintaining their religious and cultural heritage. Hussein said: “We are talking about thousands of kids who are going to the mosque for two or three hours a day to attend Madressah. Young kids are also spending six or seven hours a day in school and by the time they get home often don’t have time to become involved in community activities. “I remember finishing school at 4pm, going to Madressah and returning home to do my homework. After that, there wasn’t time to do anything but go to bed. We have to help integrate young people and activities such as playing football with other children helps that process. A lot of my non-Muslim friends did that, but I wasn’t able to.

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Welsh Tories bid for Muslim vote

Welsh Tories are making an attempt to bring the country’s Muslims into their fold. In the past, these communities have mostly seen the Labour Party as their natural home but this is now changing, Welsh Conservative leader Nick Bourne told the inaugural meeting of the Welsh Conservative Forum in Cardiff. “Following our landslide defeat in 1997, the Conservative Party recognised that it had to change,” Mr Bourne said. “If we were to regain power, we had to become more representative of the people we wanted to serve in government. A party capable of representing all Britain and all Britons.
“On his election as Leader, David Cameron promised to reach out to minority ethnic communities and to recognise the contribution immigrants have made to our prosperity and culture. “And I am determined that we should do so in Wales as well. I believe the Welsh Conservative Muslim Forum marks an important milestone on the road to increasing Conservative engagement with the Muslim community. “In many ways, Muslim values are Conservative values. We all believe in strong families, in enterprise, in self reliance and in individual responsibility.

Full-text article continues here.(Some news sites may require registration)