“Government, are you waiting for aggression?”

June 7, 2013

 

This is the tough stance of the president of the League of Muslims in Ticino. “The UDC posters (previously reported on by Euro-Islam: http://www.euro-islam.info/2009/04/28/swiss-high-court-rules-udc-muslim-posters-not-racist/) reminds us of the propaganda in the ’30s”

 

The debate focuses on the controversial posters of UDC that portray two immigrants riding two Swiss; the poster has finally been brought to the attention of the Muslim community. The president of the League of Muslims in Ticino, Gasmi Slaheddine wrote to the government requesting decisive action. “Say enough to these constant attacks on the Muslim community,” it reads.

 

According Slaheddine, “the majority of people of the Islamic community in Ticino are well integrated, both socially and professionally. There are men and women who contribute to the growth and prosperity of this country as doctors, engineers, economists, artisans, teachers, cooks… to name just a few examples. Many of these workers are of Swiss nationality.”

Switzerland debates minarets and Muslims

An overwhelming rejection of the “minaret initiative” in Switzerland, scheduled for November 29th, would serve as encouragement to all Swiss Muslims. And treating Swiss Muslims as respected and loyal residents would enhance openness and mutual trust in the country. The debate over the integration of the Muslim community into Swiss society is not new and has long been the subject of considerable political tension. The most recent controversy is no different and has already fuelled a heated discussion on whether the construction of minarets in Switzerland should be banned. The Democratic Union of the Centre (UDC, also known as the Swiss People’s Party), a major Swiss political party and forerunner of Swiss conservatism, first initiated the debate. The UDC quickly gathered the requisite 100,000 signatures necessary for a national referendum scheduled for the fall of 2009. It is worthwhile to note that Switzerland has only four minarets throughout the country even though Islam is the country’s second largest religion after Christianity. The UDC is actively mobilising public opinion against what it labels the “Islamisation” of Switzerland, claiming that the percentage of Muslims – 5 percent – has grown too rapidly since the 1980s. But people have been speaking out against this view. Several experts and political leaders have questioned the legality and compliance of the referendum initiative with the Swiss Constitution and the European Charter of Human Rights (ECHR). According to them, the insertion in the constitution of an article prohibiting the building of new minarets would be tantamount to encroaching on other fundamental rights also guaranteed by the same federal constitution, such as equality before the law (Article 8); freedom of belief and conscience (Article 15); guarantee of property ownership (Article 26); the principle of proportionality (Article 5); adherence to international law (Article 5); and prohibition of discrimination (Article 8). At the pan-European level, referendum opponents refer to Article 9 of the European Charter of Human Rights, which guarantees the protection of freedom of thought, conscience and religion. Both the Swiss government and parliament, however, have agreed to allow the Swiss to vote on the issue and express their opinions in a democratic arena. As such, over the coming months, Swiss civil society and media must begin an honest and constructive debate over the possible consequences of such a referendum, using television as the most efficient way to reach Swiss households. It is, for example, important to explain that the minaret is part of a mosque’s architectural structure, just as a bell tower is an integral part of most churches, and that the minaret is not the symbolic representation of Islamic law (which is construed by some as undemocratic). Moreover, the Swiss media could invite the imam of the Bosnian Islamic community in Geneva, representatives of the Turkish Islamic community, representatives of the Albanian Islamic community and Swiss students to partake in a public debate. It is through television, radio and newspapers, with their direct impact on public opinions, that proper information on Islam and its practice in Switzerland can be disseminated. Certainly, such during such a debate there are some who would depict Switzerland’s Muslims as disrespectful of Swiss law, unworthy of trust and unpatriotic. However, the reality is different, given the high levels of integration of Muslims in Switzerland. Ultimately, this referendum presents an opportunity to show the world that the Swiss respect the faiths of their fellow citizens. A variety of voices must engage in the debate in order to persuade citizens that support for banning minarets would be potentially detrimental to national unity.

Over the past decade, Switzerland has invested heavily in social cohesion, notably by stopping the growth of ghettos which create socio-economic barriers, and by supporting the integration of new immigrants, particularly Muslims. Emir Cengic reports.

Switzerland debates Islam and minarets

The debate over the integration of the Muslim community into Swiss society is not new and has long been the subject of considerable political tension. The most recent controversy is no different and has already fuelled a heated discussion on whether the construction of minarets in Switzerland should be banned. The Democratic Union of the Centre (UDC, also known as the Swiss People’s Party), a major Swiss political party and forerunner of Swiss conservatism, first initiated the debate. The UDC quickly gathered the requisite 100,000 signatures necessary for a national referendum scheduled for the fall of 2009. It is worthwhile to note that Switzerland has only four minarets throughout the country even though Islam is the country’s second largest religion after Christianity. The UDC is actively mobilizing public opinion against what it labels the “Islamization” of Switzerland, claiming that the percentage of Muslims – 5 percent – has grown too rapidly since the 1980s. But people have been speaking out against this view. Several experts and political leaders have questioned the legality and compliance of the referendum initiative with the Swiss Constitution and the European Charter of Human Rights (ECHR). According to them, the insertion in the Constitution of an article prohibiting the building of new minarets would be tantamount to encroaching on other fundamental rights also guaranteed by the same federal Constitution, such as equality before the law (Article 8); freedom of belief and conscience (Article 15); guarantee of property ownership (Article 26); the principle of proportionality (Article 5); adherence to international law (Article 5); and prohibition of discrimination (Article 8). Mir Cengic reports.

Swiss court legitimizes hatred-inciting poster

The Swiss Federal Court acquitted coalition partner the Democratic Union of the Center (UDC), a right-wing political party, from charges of its election campaign poster inciting hatred between communities. In the poster, Swiss Muslim citizens are seen worshipping. The superscript over the photo reads “Use your heads,” urging non-Muslim citizens to vote for the party in the face of the “Muslim threat.” The Muslims, photographed whilst prostrating themselves in prayer, came together in Bern in a show of solidarity when the cartoon crisis erupted in Denmark in 2005. Ali Ihsan Aydin reports.

Swiss high court rules UDC Muslim posters not racist

The Swiss federal high court has ruled that posters of Muslims prostrating in front of the Swiss federal palace, with the slogan “use your heads” is not racist. The court argued, with one judge noting reservations, that the posters do not fulfill legal requirements for racial discrimination.

The court said, in its decision not to hear a case brought by public authorities in Valais, that the interpretation of the law should not be so narrow as to endanger freedom of expression. The law makes it illegal to humiliate or use racial prejudice against others via images, text and other means of communication. The judges noted that no member of the Muslim community pressed charges.

Campagne in Switzerland Against the Construction of Mosques

Policymakers of the Swiss Right recently began a campaign for a referendum to prohibit the construction of minarets on mosques. Des responsables politiques de la droite suisse ont r’cemment lanc’ une campagne pour la tenue d’un r’f’rendum visant ‘ interdire la construction de minarets sur les mosqu’es. According to representatives of the Union d’mocratique du centre (UDC) and of the Union d’mocratique f’d’rale (UDF), minarets “are an Islamic construction that connote imperialism” that represent a “beacon of jihad.” “Such an initiative puts the securite of the Swiss in danger,” according to the President of the Conf’d’ration and Minister of Immigration Affairs, Micheline Calmy-Rey. Switzerland has approximately 310,000 Muslims, primarily from the Balkans, among a population of 7.5 million people.

The Campagne Against Minarets “Puts the Security of the Swiss in Danger”

The campaign recently launched by representatives of the Swiss right to prohibit the construction of minarets on mosques “puts the security of the Swiss in danger” according to the President and Swiss Minister of Immigrant Affairs, Micheline Calmy-Rey. Politicians of the Union d_mocratique du centre (UDC, right populist) and Union d_mocratique f_d_rale (UDF, Christian right) have demanded since the beginning of May the organization of a referendum to prohibit the construction of minarets in Switzerland. {(continued in French)} “Une telle initiative met la s_curit_ des int_r_ts suisses, des Suissesses et des Suisses en danger”, a jug_ Mme Calmy-Rey (Parti socialiste) lors d’une rencontre avec la presse _trang_re. “La libert_ de pratiquer une religion est garantie en Suisse”, a comment_ la pr_sidente de la Conf_d_ration en s’_levant contre toute “loi d’exception” et en s’interrogeant sur la compatibilit_ d’une telle mesure d’interdiction avec la constitution suisse. Les promoteurs d’un r_f_rendum contre les minarets estiment que ces _difices sont le symbole d’une revendication du pouvoir politico-religieux par l’islam. Il s’agit de “stopper les tentatives des milieux islamistes d’imposer en Suisse un syst_me l_gal fond_ sur la charia”, selon un communiqu_ du groupe. Selon Ulrich Schl_er, parlementaire de l’UDC, le 1er parti politique suisse, les minarets sont des “constructions islamiques ayant une connotation imp_rialiste”. Pour un autre d_put_ du parti populiste, Oskar Freysinger, ils repr_sentent des “phares du djihad” (guerre sainte). Le projet d’organiser un r_f_rendum doit recueillir 100.000 signatures d’ici le 1er novembre 2008 pour _tre soumis _ un examen de constitutionnalit_ puis au vote. Il y a environ 311.000 musulmans en Suisse sur 7,5 millions d’habitants. La plupart d’entre eux sont originaires des Balkans.

Switzerland: A Quoi Sert Un Minaret? Le Débat Sémantique Vire À La Polémique

By Catherine Cossy SUISSE. Confin_es dans des halles industrielles, deux communaut_s musulmanes, _ Wangen et _ Langenthal, souhaitent plus de visibilit_ pour leur lieu de culte. Mais les oppositions se multiplier. La premi_re mosqu_e de Suisse a _t_ inaugur_e en 1963 sur les hauts de la ville de Zurich, en pr_sence du maire de l’_poque. Et depuis plus de quarante ans, sa coupole blanche et son minaret de 15 m_tres surmont_ d’un croissant de lune font partie de l’image de ce quartier d’habitation tranquille. La gracile tourelle a une fonction symbolique, comme celle de Gen_ve, les deux seuls minarets existant actuellement en Suisse pour une communaut_ de musulmans estim_e _ quelque 350000 personnes. A Wangen, commune soleuroise de 4700 habitants _ la sortie d’Olten, et _ Langenthal, gros bourg bernois de 14000 habitants, les autorit_s n’en sont pas encore _ d_rouler le tapis rouge. Pr_sent_s presque simultan_ment, les projets d’_riger un minaret de 6 m_tres _chauffent les esprits. Dans les deux cas, on est loin de la mosqu_e pimpante de la Forchstrasse _ Zurich. A Wangen, l’association culturelle turque d’Olten _Olten T_rk K_lt_r Ocagi_ se retrouve dans une ancienne halle de fabrique, juste en face de la gare. Le b_timent d’un _tage, situ_ dans une zone r_serv_e _ l’artisanat, sert de lieu de r_union et de pri_re. Les responsables parlent du minaret comme _signe visible de notre religion_. La commune a refus_ l’autorisation de construire, le D_partement des constructions du canton, premi_re instance de recours, vient de casser la d_cision. L’opposition est emmen_e par le vice-pr_sident de la section locale de l’UDC, Roland Kissling, qui a notamment r_colt_ pr_s de 400 signatures. _Nous sommes chr_tiens. Un minaret est une menace pour la paix religieuse. Et qui nous dit que les musulmans vont s’arr_ter l_ et ne vont pas installer un haut-parleur?_, argumente-t-il. Fin juin, le Parlement soleurois a rejet_ clairement une motion de l’UDC qui voulait interdire _la construction de b_timents religieux g_nants_. Opposants de tous bords A Langenthal, la proc_dure n’est pas encore aussi avanc_e, mais une coalition h_t_roclite d’opposants est d_j_ mobilis_e. On y retrouve l’UDC, mais aussi le Pnos -Parti nationaliste suisse d’extr_me droite, qui compte un repr_sentant au parlement de la cit_- et des milieux _vang_liques. La commune n’a pas encore pris de d_cision. Le centre de la communaut_ musulmane, compos_e majoritairement d’Albanais, se trouve depuis quatorze ans dans une sorte de pavillon d’un _tage, situ_ dans une zone mixte d’habitation et d’artisanat. L_ aussi, il est pr_vu d’installer un minaret, ainsi qu’une coupole translucide de un m_tre de diam_tre. Pas un hasard Le nouveau Conseil suisse des religions, fond_ en mai dernier, a _t_ pris de vitesse par la pol_mique. Il a pr_vu de consacrer sa premi_re s_ance, au mois d’ao_t, _ la question des minarets. Pour Hisham Maizar, si_geant comme pr_sident de la F_d_ration d’organisations islamiques en Suisse (FOIS), ce n’est pas un hasard si deux communaut_s projettent de construire un minaret. _La premi_re g_n_ration des _migrants musulmans ma_trisait _ peine la langue du pays. Leurs organisations se contentaient d’exprimer des besoins tr_s modestes. Maintenant, leur nombre a augment_, la deuxi_me, voire la troisi_me g_n_ration est install_e, elle est devenue plus courageuse. Ils parlent l’allemand, connaissent mieux le cadre l_gislatif. Ce ne sont d’ailleurs pas des demandes qui sortent du n_ant: il y a tout une _volution invisible jusque-l_ qui a eu lieu. D’autres demandes vont certainement suivre._ Hisham Maizar se veut rassurant: _Le minaret n’est pas le signe d’une radicalisation. C’est tout au plus le signe d’un attachement _ la tradition. Les extr_mistes ont d’autres besoins. Et chaque centre islamique ne va pas se doter d’un minaret. Pour les fid_les, ce symbole exprime un besoin de visibilit_. C’est d’autant plus important que la plupart des lieux de culte sont des b_timents en fait indignes de cette fonction, garage, ancienne fabrique, entrep_t en pleine zone industrielle. C’est un paradoxe: les touristes suisses vont admirer au sud de l’Espagne les merveilles architecturales laiss_es par les musulmans. Le mieux serait en fait de pouvoir _difier en Suisse une mosqu_e digne de ce nom, un b_timent d’une grande valeur artistique… Mais ce n’est pas r_aliste._ Refus d’int_gration Sa_da Keller Messahli, pr_sidente du Forum pour un islam progressiste, fait part de son scepticisme: _Nous postulons que la religion doit _tre quelque chose de priv_. Si le minaret n’est qu’un symbole, on peut tout aussi bien y renoncer. Une salle de pri_re n’en a pas besoin._ Selon elle, les projets de minaret _manent de cercles conservateurs: _Ils veulent rester entre eux et imposer leur diff_rence. Ils demandent toujours plus _ la soci_t_, et ne sont pas pr_ts _ donner eux aussi quelque chose et _ ouvrir la voie _ une confrontation des arguments. La population suisse ressent ce refus de faire un pas vers elle, et je comprends que certains aient peur. Je ne parle pas bien s_r des partis qui exploitent ces craintes._ _Ce N’est Pas Un Coup De Force, Juste Un _l_ment D’architecture_ La mosqu_e du Petit-Saconnex _ Gen_ve a, d_s sa construction en 1978, _t_ dot_e d’un minaret. Le porte-parole du Centre islamique genevois, Hafid Ouardiri, revient sur ce symbole de l’islam. Propos recueillis par Philippe Miauton A Wangen, l’_rection d’un minaret suscite la crainte. Selon vous, est-ce la symbolique de l’islam ou la possibilit_ donn_e _ un muezzin d’y faire son appel quotidien _ la pri_re qui g_n_re cette lev_e de boucliers? Hafid Ouardiri: Tout d’abord je tiens _ pr_ciser que le minaret, comme une _glise poss_de son clocher, est une partie int_grante de l’architecture d’une mosqu_e. Dans la zone industrielle de Wangen, il s’inscrit surtout comme signe distinctif et de rassemblement. A propos des craintes, elles _manent avant tout de minorit_s qui r_agissent par ignorance. Dans la mesure o_ en Suisse, il n’y a pas de restriction _ exprimer sa foi et que ce symbole de l’islam n’est pas un coup de force mais un _l_ment architectural, il n’y a pas de crainte _ avoir. – La construction de cette tour est-elle assortie en Suisse d’une interdiction d’appel _ la pri_re par l’entremise d’un muezzin ou de haut-parleurs? – Dans le cas de Gen_ve, la mosqu_e, inaugur_e par le pr_sident de la Conf_d_ration de l’_poque, n’a connu aucune restriction. La seule condition formul_e alors concernait plut_t des soucis d’urbanisme. Le minaret ne devait pas d_passer les immeubles avoisinants. Par ailleurs, au Petit-Saconnex, l’appel _ la pri_re ne se fait que dans le patio de l’_difice. – Comptez-vous dans un avenir proche effectuer cet appel du haut du minaret? – Rien ne nous l’interdirait, quand bien m_me nous allons maintenir pour le moment ce rituel dans le patio de la mosqu_e. En cas de changement d’habitude, le muezzin pourrait faire son appel _ voix humaine, sans microphone. Pour nous, le respect du voisin est primordial. Nous n’avons pour l’instant eu aucune plainte. Notre int_gration _ Gen_ve est en tous points remarquable. – A vos yeux, un tel proc_d_ ne pourrait-il pas heurter la population? – Une nouvelle fois, dans la mesure o_ la tranquillit_ du voisinage n’est pas atteinte, cet aspect traditionnel ne doit pas offusquer les gens. Cela ne repr_sente qu’un _l_ment de l’islam parmi tant d’autres. Il n’y a aucune revendication dans cet acte. – Comment juger la situation interconfessionnelle en Suisse? – Nous sommes _ Gen_ve, comme dans toute la Suisse, bien lotis au vu de la situation internationale. La pluralit_ confessionnelle domine. Il faut continuer _ cultiver cette ouverture. Les m_mes r_gles et les m_mes lois sont valables pour tous. Dans ce cadre, la construction d’un minaret ne devrait pas susciter autant de r_actions.