Alleged member of AQIM (Al Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb area) expelled from Spain

March 18, 2014

 

Nouh Mediouni, a young North African, 23 years old, has been expelled from Spain on Tuesday after being arrested on the 23 April 2013 in Zaragoza as alleged member of Al Qaeda.
He is accused of being a member of AQIM (Al Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb area) and was recruited through their digital forum. He received specific instructions for a trip to a jihadist training camp located in northern Mali.
At the time of the arrest , Nouh Mediouni had with him electronic devices to prepare a car bomb.

 

Aragon digital: http://www.aragondigital.es/noticia.asp?notid=118270#.UyqRyI722bg.twitter

The Reluctant Fundamentalist – Film Review

Its message might be flabby, but Mira Nair’s adaptation of Mohsin Hamid’s novel is still a bold piece of global storytelling. Based on the 2007 novel by Mohsin Hamid, this is an ambitious, heartfelt tale of divided loyalties in a world where complacent belief in the triumph of globalised capital was shattered by the Twin Towers attack. Ahmed is Changez, a firebrand Muslim professor in Pakistan, suspected by the CIA of anti-American jihadism. But Changez is to reveal that his ideological training camp was a Wall Street corporation: years before, as a bright immigrant to the US, he got an Ivy League scholarship and was fast-tracked into a high-flying Manhattan job, where he learned to be internationally strategic and ruthless. But 9/11 changes him, and as people of his skin colour and background come to be reviled in New York, Changez reconsiders his loyalties and life choices.

The lonely wolves were part of one of the bloodiest fraction of the AQIM

24 April 2013

 

Nouh Mediouni, a member of Al Qaeda for the Islamic Maghreb (AQIM), who was arrested yesterday in Zaragoza in the operation of the General Information Commissioner of the National Police, had numerous contacts with the “katibas” (units of combat), who were commanded by Moktar ben Moktar (presumed dead in the war in Mali, although his supporters say he is alive).
His “katibas’ split late last year from the AQIM and founded a new organization:” The signatories with blood. ” This was the Islamist faction who starred in the assault on the Algerian gas plant, which ended in complete failure, as the hostage plan to ask for money for their rescue was aborted by the security forces of that country.
Mediouni, who had been captured by a Moroccan Islamist who currently is in prison, is 23 and was arrested in Zaragoza. “Because of its high degree of radicalization, Nou Mediouni was recruited in this digital forum. Received specific instructions for the trip to a jihadist training camp located in northern Mali and directed by AQIM”.
The other arrested in Murcia, is Hassan El Jaaouani, of Moroccan origin, 52, unemployed. He had also established contact with the AQIM cell located in Mali and also responsible for the recruitment of radicals in Spain.
AQIM represents the main threat to Spain within the Islamic world. Its “press office” is entitled “Al Andalus”, referring to the terrorists claim to recover the Spanish territories, in order to establish now the “World Caliphate.”
Spain is a land of passage for the ‘jihad’ from Africa that aim to reach other European countries in order to organize “sleeping cells” or, where appropriate, carry out attacks.

Two people arrested in Spain for presumed connection to Al-Qaeda

Two men have been arrested this morning in Zaragoza and Murcia for being allegedly linked to Al Qaeda, as part of an operation ordered by the National Court.
The two suspected terrorists detained are Nou Mediouni, of Algerian origin, and held in Zaragoza, and Hassan El Jaaouani, of Moroccan origin, and arrested in Murcia. They are “supposedly radical members of a cell related to the terrorist organization AQIM (Al Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb),” said a statement issued by the National Police.
However, Interior Minister, Jorge Fernandez, has not confirmed that the two men were related among them. Sources of the National Court also notes that it cannot be said yet that they belong to a jihadist cell, although both of them have visited radical Islamic websites. The profile of those detained, according to the police statement, correspond to the two people who recently committed the attack in the Boston Marathon.
The Interior Ministry said in a second press release that Nou Mediouni was a”regular user of a known radical Islamist platform based in Mali from which AQIM is responsible, and that recruits candidates presenting more radical profiles “. Mediouni, according to police, was recruited by the forum “for its high degree of radicalization” and was instructed to travel to a “jihadist training camp located in northern Mali and directed by AQIM.”However, the note explains, “strong international police pressure on the ground” prevented him to contact those responsible for the field and was forced to return to Spain.

‘Toronto 18′ judgment: the RCMP’s prized mole is vindicated

Macleans – December 4, 201212 Comments

 

It has been almost seven years since police rounded up the so-called “Toronto 18,” thwarting a very real terrorist plot on Canadian soil. In time, the Crown and the courts separated the ringleaders from the stooges: charges were dropped against seven of the accused Muslims, while the other 11 were convicted and punished according to their level of guilt. Of the four core members who tried to detonate simultaneous truck bombs in downtown Toronto—a “spine-chilling” plot, as one judge said—two are now serving life sentences.

The answer, says Ontario’s highest court, is an emphatic no. “To impose on the police an obligation to ensure that undercover operators infiltrating a potential terrorist camp be equipped with some sort of strategy to warn youth (who may or may not be present) of the potential error of their ways, is neither tenable nor realistic,” the court concluded. “The prospects of such a strategy subverting the investigation, and possibly endangering the safety of the operative, are limitless.”

 

The ruling is a resounding victory for the RCMP—and vindication for Mubin Shaikh, the controversial civilian informant who was paid $300,000 to infiltrate the inner circle. The pinnacle of Shaikh’s undercover work was a now-infamous winter “training camp” near Orillia, Ont., where a dozen participants spent two weeks marching in the snow and learning to fire a semi-automatic handgun. One of those campers was a 17-year-old who had recently converted to Islam—and who would later become the youngest of the group convicted and sentenced (to 30 months).

FBI offers $50,000 reward for Mass. man facing terrorism charges; suspect may be in Syria

BOSTON — A $50,000 reward is being offered for information leading to the arrest of a Massachusetts man who is wanted on terrorism charges, the FBI said Wednesday.

The FBI said it is seeking the public’s help in locating Ahmad Abousamra, a U.S. citizen from Mansfield who authorities believe may be living in the battleground Syrian city of Aleppo with at least one child, a daughter, and extended family. He uses several aliases.

Abousamra, now 31, fled the United States in 2006, shortly after being interviewed by the FBI.

The FBI says Abousamra is an associate of Tarek Mehanna, a Sudbury man convicted on four terrorism charges and sentenced this year to 17½ years in prison.

Abousamra was indicted in 2009 after taking multiple trips to Pakistan and Yemen, where he attempted to obtain military training for the purpose of killing American soldiers overseas, the FBI said. He also traveled to Iraq in the hope of joining forces fighting against the United States, but the exact nature of his activities there is unknown, the FBI said.

Prosecutors said during Mehanna’s trial that Mehanna and Abousamra had failed to find a terrorist training camp.

The FBI said it will use traditional media and social media like Facebook and Twitter as well as its website to make photos, an audio clip of Abousamra’s voice and wanted posters in English, French and Arabic available to the public.

Abousamra was born in France, is of Syrian descent and has dual citizenship in the United States and Syria. He speaks, reads and writes fluently in English and Arabic, and has a college degree related to computer technology.

Extradited Muslim Cleric and 4 Other Terrorism Suspects Appear in American Courts after being extradited from Britain.

NEW YORK — A radical Muslim cleric whose fiery sermons at a London mosque were blamed for influencing followers to embrace a holy war against the United States arrived in New York on Saturday along with other terrorism suspects after losing a battle to fight extradition from Britain.

Abu Hamza Masri, also known as Mustafa Kamel Mustafa; Adel Abdel Bary; and Khaled Fawwaz appeared in federal court in Manhattan hours after their arrival in the U.S. to face multiple terrorism-related charges. Two other suspects were sent to Connecticut.

After a protracted battle in the British and European courts, Abu Hamza al-Masri, an incendiary Muslim preacher with links to Al Qaeda, and four other terrorism suspects implicated in an array of terrorist plots were extradited to the United States on Saturday to face federal charges in Manhattan and New Haven.

The two other defendants in Manhattan, Adel Abdul Bary, 52, and Khaled al-Fawwaz, 50, were arraigned on charges including murder and conspiracy to use weapons of mass destruction in connection with the 1998 bombings of the American Embassies in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, and in Nairobi, Kenya, in which more than 200 people died. They pleaded not guilty.

In New Haven on Saturday, the final two defendants, Seyla Talha Ahsan, 33, and Babar Ahmad, 38, pleaded not guilty to charges that included conspiring to recruit fighters, raise money and gather equipment for terrorists on Web sites hosted out of Connecticut.

Federal authorities in the United States had long been seeking the extradition of Mr. Masri, an Egyptian-born cleric, for his involvement in a 1998 kidnapping of American citizens in Yemen, supporting the establishment of a terrorist training camp in Bly, Ore., and “facilitating violent jihad in Afghanistan,” according to a statement by the United States attorney in Manhattan. If convicted, Mr. Masri could face life in prison.

UK is to extradite Muslim suspects to the US

25 September 2012

 

After a long legal battle the UK is finally preparing to extradite five Muslims who are deemed to be extremists by the British authorities, including Muslim cleric Abu Hamza al-Masri and Babar Ahmad, to the United States.  The Grand Chamber of The European Court of Human Rights has ruled that they can be sent to the United States to face terrorism charges.

 

Abu Hamza is currently serving a seven-year prison term in Britain for inciting hatred and he is wanted in the US for planning a terror training camp in the US and assisting hostage-taking in Yemen. The other suspects, Babar Ahmad, Syed Talha Ahsan, Adel Abdul Bary and Khaled al-Fawwaz are also facing similar charges.

 

Meantime, it has been revealed that the Queen herself lobbied for arrest of Abu Hamza. In an interview, BBC’s security correspondent Frank Gardner said the Queen told him she was appalled that Abu Hamza could not be arrested while he regularly delivered anti-British speeches as imam of Finsbury Park mosque in north London.

 

Gardner said: “She spoke to the home secretary at the time and said, surely this man must have broken some laws. Why is he still at large? He was conducting these radical activities and he called Britain a toilet. He was incredibly anti-British and yet he was sucking up money from this country for a long time. He was a huge embarrassment to Muslims, who condemned him.”

 

Chicagoan accused of plotting to be suicide bomber for al-Qaida, al-Shabab to plead guilty

CHICAGO — A 29-year-old Chicago man accused of plotting a suicide bombing overseas and claiming he was inspired by a radical Muslim cleric has agreed to change his plea to guilty, bringing to an end one of the last terrorism trials pending in the city’s federal court.

A lawyer for Shaker Masri — whose plea deal was announced Thursday at a status hearing — told reporters that the agreement hammered out with the U.S. Attorney’s Office was favorable to his client, though he declined to elaborate

Masri, who was born in Alabama and lived abroad before returning to the U.S. at age 18, was arrested in 2010 after the FBI exposed his alleged plot to attend a Somalia training camp to become a suicide bomber for terrorist groups al-Qaida and al-Shabab.

Attorneys left open the possibility that the plea deal could still unravel, but Durkin told U.S. District Judge Sharon Johnson Coleman he was confident enough to have the Sept. 12 trial date cancelled. Coleman set July 20 as the day for Masri to change his plea.

None of the government attorneys spoke to reporters after the hearing.

Beyond Guantánamo, a Web of Prisons for Terrorism Inmates

WASHINGTON — It is the other Guantánamo, an archipelago of federal prisons that stretches across the country, hidden away on back roads. Today, it houses far more men convicted in terrorism cases than the shrunken population of the prison in Cuba that has generated so much debate.

An aggressive prosecution strategy, aimed at prevention as much as punishment, has sent away scores of people. They serve long sentences, often in restrictive, Muslim-majority units, under intensive monitoring by prison officers. Their world is spare.

Among them is Ismail Royer, serving 20 years for helping friends go to an extremist training camp in Pakistan.
In recent weeks, Congress has reignited an old debate, with some arguing that only military justice is appropriate for terrorist suspects. But military tribunals have proved excruciatingly slow and imprisonment at Guantánamo hugely costly — $800,000 per inmate a year, compared with $25,000 in federal prison.

The criminal justice system, meanwhile, has absorbed the surge of terrorism cases since 2001 without calamity, and without the international criticism that Guantánamo has attracted for holding prisoners without trial.