The “hawala” a method of financing terrorism moves 300 million Euros in Spain

April 4, 2014

 

The ‘ hawala ‘ is an opaque and easy way to send money to any corner of the world. A system that can move 100,000 USD per day and is based on the relationship of trust between the partners in the chain of money delivery. Confidentiality and opacity have made it one of the methods of financing terrorist Jihadi groups. In fact, the ‘ hawala ‘ has been linked to the recruitment or movement of funds from organizations linked to Al Qaeda, such as the Al Qaeda for the Islamic Maghreb.
In Spain and Portugal an organization that allegedly laundered funds for this transfer system was dismantled resulting in at least 18 detainees linked to an organization that allegedly provided services to drug traffickers.

 

La informacion: http://noticias.lainformacion.com/policia-y-justicia/narcotrafico/detenidas-18-personas-de-una-organizacion-que-blanqueaba-dinero-de-otras-redes-criminales-con-metodo-hawala_8rgbrocLCshl7OjavOk9F5/

http://noticias.lainformacion.com/policia-y-justicia/terrorismo/el-hawala-que-mueve-300-millones-en-espana-una-forma-de-financiar-el-terrorismo_Ejl198nENXuetUwnjoshw4/

Seven-year sentence for Laurel man who tried to join up with al-Shabab terrorist group

January13, 2014

 

A 26-year-old Laurel man was sentenced Monday to seven years in prison after he admitted traveling to Africa to try to join the terrorist group al-Shabab and trashing his home computer so federal investigators could not track him, authorities said.
Craig Baxam was arrested by Kenyan authorities in December 2011, and he soon told FBI agents of his haphazard plan to elude them and connect with al-Shabab because he wanted to live somewhere that rigorously adhered to sharia, or Islamic, law, court papers say. He pleaded guilty to a charge of destroying records that might be used in a terrorism investigation and received the seven-year sentence as part of an agreement with federal prosecutors, authorities said.

Federal investigators have long worked to root out so-called homegrown terror suspects, and Special Agent Stephen E. Vogt, who heads the FBI’s Baltimore division, said in a statement that Baxam’s case “highlights the FBI’s highest investigative priority, the prevention of terrorist acts.” But the resolution of the case seems to demonstrate that Baxam did not precisely fit the bill of a would-be terrorist.

Baxam was not convicted of the initial charge of attempting to provide material support to a terrorist organization, and his attorney, Linda Moreno, said he never advocated specific violence, nor did he procure weapons or attend any terrorist training camps.
A 2005 graduate of Laurel High School who was born in Takoma Park, Baxam had experience in the Army and admitted to investigators that he was willing to commit violence, according to the criminal complaint against him. But he said that he felt offensive jihad was questionable, and his main use for violence would be to defend al-Shabab’s Somali territories from potential invaders, according to the complaint.

Moreno said that the violence he spoke of was only hypothetical, “based on interviews with the FBI where the FBI asked him what if this happened, what if that happened, what if the following.”

“Craig wanted to live and practice his religion in a country where he felt that Muslims were not oppressed,” Moreno said. “This was not a terrorism case.”

 

Washington Post: http://www.washingtonpost.com/local/crime/seven-year-sentence-for-laurel-man-who-tried-to-join-up-with-al-shabaab-terrorist-group/2014/01/13/539c5d8a-7c80-11e3-95c6-0a7aa80874bc_story.html

Ex-Michigan congressman sentenced to more than a year in prison in terrorism financing case

KANSAS CITY, Mo. — A former Michigan congressman and U.S. delegate to the United Nations has been sentenced to a year and one day in prison for lobbying for a Missouri-based Islamic charity that had been identified as a global terrorist organization.

Mark Deli Siljander, 60, a Republican who served in Congress from 1981-1987, pleaded guilty in July 2010 to obstructing justice and acting as an unregistered foreign agent in connection with his work for the Islamic American Relief Agency, based in Columbia, Mo.

In his plea agreement, Siljander acknowledged that he lobbied between March and May 2004 on behalf of the IARA for the organization to be removed from a U.S. Senate Finance Committee list of charities suspected of funding international terrorism. The charity closed in October 2004 after being designated a global terrorist organization by the U.S. government.

Four co-defendants also were sentenced Wednesday. Among them were former IARA executive director Mubarak Hamed, who sent more than $1 million to Iraq through the charity in violation of U.S. sanctions. He pleaded guilty in June 2010 to illegally transferring the money and obstructing the administration of laws governing tax-exempt charities.

Woman in Ottawa Funnels Funds to Britain in Alleged Terrorist Financing Scheme

In this Ottawa trial last week, it was revealed that former software designer Momin Khawaja used an Ottawa-area woman to funnel funds to colleagues in an alleged terrorist financing scheme. Zenab Armandpisheh testified she met Mr. Khawaja in the fall of 2002 in an Internet chat room when she was an 18-year-old college student, but cut off ties in mid-2003 as she grew suspicious of his activities. She never knew his real name, but shortly after was put into contact with Anthony Garcia, one of the five men convicted by a British jury last year of plotting to bomb target in and around London. Ms. Armandpisheh also said that Mr. Khawaja sent her several emails about various recent terrorist attacks and handed her a number of DVDs depicting jihadi activities, encouraging that she “play them for others.”

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U.S. Prosecution of Muslim Group Ends in Mistrial

DALLAS, Oct. 22 – A federal judge declared a mistrial on Monday in what was widely seen as the government’s flagship terrorism-financing case after prosecutors failed to persuade a jury to convict five leaders of a Muslim charity on any charges, or even to reach a verdict on many of the 197 counts. The case, involving the Holy Land Foundation for Relief and Development and five of its backers, is the government’s largest and most complex legal effort to shut down what it contends is American financing for terrorist organizations in the Middle East. President Bush announced he was freezing the charity’s assets in December 2001, saying that the radical Islamic group Hamas had obtained much of the money it pays for murder abroad right here in the United States.