Sweden gets its first Muslim folk high school

After three years as a branch of a Baptist folk high school, Kista Muslim Folk High School became Swedens first Muslim folk high school January 8. The schools principle Abdulkader Habib says the school is an answer to the needs of the neighborhood, in the northwest of Stockholm, with its large immigrant population. He explains the school to be a produce of a close collaboration between Muslims and Christians in Kista, with the intention to have a positive effect on the educational development on the local community, using ideas and tools of the peoples education era fifty years ago.

The school is to be open to everyone, not only to Muslims. “This can help integration – or development, as I rather want to call it”, Abdulkader Habib says.

Muslims in Europe: A Report on 11 EU Cities

The Open Society Institute Muslims in Europe report series constitutes the comparative analysis of data from 11 cities in seven European countries. It points out common trends and offers recommendations at the local, national, and international levels, including to the European Union and to international organizations. While not representative of the situation of all Muslims in these cities, this report does capture a snapshot of the experiences of Muslim communities in select neighborhoods in Amsterdam and Rotterdam, Antwerp, Berlin and Hamburg, Copenhagen, Leicester and Waltham Forest–London, Marseille and Paris, and Stockholm.

This body of work comes in response to major trends with regards to Muslims living in Europe: whether citizens or migrants, native born or newly-arrived, Muslims are a growing and varied population that presents Europe with one of its greatest challenges, namely how to ensure equal rights and opportunities for all in a climate of rapidly expanding diversity.

Muslims in Europe: A Report on 11 EU Cities, by Open Society Institute

The Open Society Institute Muslims in Europe report series constitutes the comparative analysis of data from 11 cities in seven European countries. It points out common trends and offers recommendations at the local, national, and international levels, including to the European Union and to international organizations. While not representative of the situation of all Muslims in these cities, this report does capture a snapshot of the experiences of Muslim communities in select neighborhoods in Amsterdam and Rotterdam, Antwerp, Berlin and Hamburg, Copenhagen, Leicester and Waltham Forest–London, Marseille and Paris, and Stockholm.

This body of work comes in response to major trends with regards to Muslims living in Europe: whether citizens or migrants, native born or newly-arrived, Muslims are a growing and varied population that presents Europe with one of its greatest challenges, namely how to ensure equal rights and opportunities for all in a climate of rapidly expanding diversity.

Sweden: Swedish Muslims localize cartoon crisis

Swedish Muslims have no intention of internationalizing a new crisis involving an offensive drawing of Prophet Muhammad (PBUH). STOCKHOLM – Swedish Muslims have no intention of internationalizing a new crisis involving an offensive drawing of Prophet Muhammad (peace and blessing be upon him), opting for a series of peaceful protests at home. “Swedish Muslims don’t want to escalate the situation,” Mohamed Al-Khalafi, the head of the Muslim Association of Sweden, told IslamOnline.