New Book: The Oxford Handbook of European Islam (Jocelyne Cesari, Editor)

European Islam CoverThe Oxford Handbook of European Islam is the first collection to present a comprehensive approach to the multiple and changing ways Islam has been studied across European countries. Parts one to three address the state of knowledge of Islam and Muslims within a selection of European countries, while presenting a critical view of the most up-to-date data specific to each country. These chapters analyse the immigration cycles and policies related to the presence of Muslims, tackling issues such as discrimination, post-colonial identity, adaptation, and assimilation. The thematic chapters, in parts four and five, examine secularism, radicalization, Shari’a, Hijab, and Islamophobia with the goal of synthesizing different national discussion into a more comparative theoretical framework. The Handbook attempts to balance cutting edge assessment with the knowledge that the content itself will eventually be superseded by events. Featuring eighteen newly-commissioned essays by noted scholars in the field, this volume will provide an excellent resource for students and scholars interested in European Studies, immigration, Islamic studies, and the sociology of religion.

Thesis Claims Dutch Temp Agencies Enable Discrimination

2 November 2011

 

A master’s thesis written by two sociology students at Amsterdam’s Free University concludes that the nation’s temporary job agencies participate in discrimination. The researchers note that in 76.8% of cases, temp agencies agreed when asked whether it was possible not to supply Turkish, Moroccan or Surinamese workers – a clear violation of Dutch anti-discrimination law.

US Homegrown terrorism still a small threat, study says

Homegrown terrorism is not a significant threat in the US, according to Professor Charles Kurzman, a professor of sociology at the University of North Carolina and co-author of “Anti-Terror Lessons of Muslim-American Communities.”

The study reveals that the number of individuals involved in terrorism in the US was only 139 since 2001, not enough of an increase to label it a trend, even after the Fort Hood and Christmas Day incidents.

Contemporary Muslim Consumer Cultures – an Emerging Field of Study

Consumer culture in the Muslim world, or Muslims as a specific target group who participate actively in a consumer market, are rather new realms for academic researchers. For many Muslims, consumption plays an increasing role in identity formation. Their growing cultural and religious self-awareness transforms markets, advertising strategies and consumer behavior. Muslim consumer culture is closely interrelated to globalization and is, therefore, of relevance to various areas of economic, sociological, anthropological, psychological and religious scholarship. However, so far scholarly research on this subject has been very limited. And though studies very often acknowledge or include the interdisciplinary character of Muslim consumer culture, there is still a need for a comprehensive analysis of its many aspects.

The conference aims at creating a network of international scholars and young researchers with various approaches to the subject, and it also aims at initiating exchange and cooperation between them to develop the basic grounds for this emerging field of study. It will include two invited keynote speakers, two panel discussions led by experts, and a number of workshops during which all participants will have the opportunity to present and discuss their research projects. There will be no more than 20 speakers to allow useful discussion. We especially encourage applications from the Middle East, Africa and Asia.

Submissions of abstracts and papers on the following broad themes are encouraged:

  • Issues of advertising products for a Muslim target group 
  
  • Gender-specific consumption behavior in a Muslim context 

  • “Western” versus “Islamic” brands 
  
  • The question whether there is such a thing as an Islamic consumer, and how it can be defined 
 Products geared toward a religious public (e.g. Islamic fashion) 
  
  • Recent developments in the consumer landscape of Muslim societies 
  
  • Religious and moral factors affecting individual patterns of consumption or legislation, e.g. questions of ritual purity.

All papers that are submitted by the start of the conference and successfully complete a peer-review process will be published in a concerence volume.

Please submit your application, including an abstract of about 150-200 words and a short c.v., by May 15, 2008, preferrably by e-mail. Registration fee is 50 €; lodging, breakfast and lunch meals will be provided. We offer a reimbursement of travel costs for participants from the Middle East, Africa, Asia, Turkey, the Americas and the countries of the former Soviet Union if their institution is not able to cover them.

Contact: Freie Universität Berlin, Institut für Islamwissenschaft, Dr. Johanna Pink, Altensteinstr. 40, 14195 Berlin, Germany, phone: +49 (0) 30-838-51437, fax: +49 (0) 30-838-52830, e-mail: jpink@zedat.fu-berlin.de.

Youth can become addicted to extremism

Islamic extremism should be regarded as a potential addiction for vulnerable young people in the same way as alcohol, drugs or gambling, according to Scotland’s counter-terrorism co-ordinator. Allan Burnett wants to introduce rehabilitative measures similar to addiction support to prevent youngsters from becoming radicalised by fundamentalists, instead of sending them to prison. Speaking on the eve of the first anniversary of the Glasgow airport attack, Mr Burnett told The Herald that he wants to develop restorative justice and early intervention initiatives for young people as part of the strategy to stop future attacks. The Assistant Chief Constable of Fife is clear that there will be no leniency for those committing acts of serious violence. However, for young people susceptible to being led astray by extremist propaganda, he believes the emphasis should be on prevention. For that to work, he wants to build the trust of parents and the wider community so that if they come forward with concerns, their children will not be automatically penalised. “One of the things we are trying to do is early intervention, which we would use in other areas of behaviour to put a stop to it,” he said. “Just like any other perversion, the primary people who will stop (radicalisation) are parents. It happens with people concerned about their kids drinking, taking drugs or gambling. It happens right across the board and we shouldn’t be surprised that sometimes parents don’t have the knowledge or the skill to intervene in a positive way.

Full-text article continues here. (Some news sites may require registration)

European Islam: Challenges for Society and Public Policy

Works on Islam in Europe often read like a juxtaposition of national case studies covering the history and perhaps the sociology of immigrant groups in the countries considered. Although the sociology of Islam is well-developed in certain European countries such as France, Germany and the UK, it is only in its infancy as a discipline at the European level. The chapters in this work, by leading European experts in the field, therefore aim to supply policy-makers, analysts and civil society leaders with an inventory of the main issues concerning the presence of Islam in Europe. The key message is that European Islam exists as a powerful transnational phenomenon, and European policy must keep pace with this reality.

Contributors include Samir Amghar, Amel Boubekeur, Michael Emerson, Chris Allen, Valerie Amiraux, Tufyal Choudhury, Bernard Godard, Imane Karich, Isabelle Rigoni, Olivier Roy and Sara Silvestri.

Islam in Europe: Diversity, Identity and Influence

Events over recent years have increased the global interest in Islam. This volume seeks to combat generalisations about the Muslim presence in Europe by illuminating its diversity across Europe and offering a more realistic, highly differentiated picture. It contends with the monist concept of identity that suggests Islam is the shared and main definition of Muslims living in Europe. The contributors also explore the influence of the European Union on the Muslim communities within its borders, and examine how the EU is in turn affected by the Muslim presence in Europe. This book comes at a critical moment in the evolution of the place of Islam within Europe and will appeal to scholars, students and practitioners in the fields of European studies, politics and policies of the European Union, sociology, sociology of religion, and international relations. It also addresses the wider framework of uncertainties and unease about religion in Europe (Cambridge UP).

Table of Contents

    Introduction—Effie Fokas
    Christians and Muslims: memory, amity, and enmities—Tarek Mitri
    The Question of Euro-Islam: restriction or opportunity?— Jorgen Nielsen
    Muslim identities in Europe: the snare of exceptionalism—Jocelyne Cesari
    From exile to diaspora: the development of transnational Islam in Europe—Werner Schiffauer
    Bosnian Islam as “european Islam”: limits and shifts of a concept—Xavier Bougarel
    Islam in the European Commission’s system of regulation of Religion—Berengere Massignon
    Development, discrimination and reverse discrimination: effects of EU integration and regional change on the Muslims of Southeast Europe—Dia Anagnostou
    Breaching the infernal cycle? Turkey, the European Union and Religion—Valerie Amiraux
    Afterword—Aziz Al-Azmeh

Les musulmans en France: Courants, institutions, communautés: un état des lieux

Ce précis de l’islam en France se distingue par son approche sociologique et clairement dépassionnée. Dans un souci permanent d’objectivité, Bernard Godard et Sylvie Taussig ont cherché à comprendre qui sont les millions d’hommes et de femmes, partageant le quotidien de tous les Français, qui appartiennent à cette religion, volontairement ou non, plus ou moins activement, voire passivement ou de manière ouvertement critique. Menée à partir de statistiques officielles, cette enquête à la fois exhaustive et serrée permet d’appréhender non pas un islam, mais tous les islams de France qui se font face, s’épaulent ou se concurrencent. Ce livre est une radioscopie étonnante, qui surprendra par sa richesse humaine, la diversité de ses courants, mais aussi de ses oppositions internes, souvent tranchées. On saisit à quel point l’islam n’est pas le même selon les communautés (algérienne, marocaine, tunisienne, etc.), ni selon les orientations (sunnite ou chiite). On vérifie toutes les nuances qui opposent, par exemple, les musulmans originaires de Turquie à ceux qui viennent d’Asie, de même que l’on suit les débats opposant les réformistes aux fondamentalistes, les laïcs aux convertis, mais aussi tous les mouvements marginaux, qui seront peut-être majoritaires demain. Enfin, on voit se dessiner, région par région, une carte de France avec des forces nouvelles, entre éthique, business et traditionalisme. Sans se substituer aux autorités politiques ou religieuses, les auteurs posent aussi toutes les questions sur la viabilité des rapports entre islam et république. Quel financement pour les lieux de culte ? Quelle formation pour les imams ? Qui détient l’autorité religieuse ? Autant de questions qui engagent, au-delà de la communauté musulmane, l’avenir de tout notre pays (Courtesy of Robert Laffont).