Michigan bill targets use of ‘foreign’ laws like Sharia

Oralandar Brand-Williams/ The Detroit News

Detroit— A state lawmaker wants Michigan to join the trend of states banning “foreign laws,” but Muslim activists say the effort is a thinly veiled attack on Islam.

Rep. Dave Agema, R-Grandville, is pushing a bill to bar the implementation of foreign laws. It doesn’t mention Sharia — Islamic law — but he acknowledged it would be prohibited in courts under the legislation intended to prevent anyone “who tries to shove any foreign law down our throats.”

“No foreign law shall supersede federal laws or constitution or state laws or constitution,” Agema said. “Our law is our law. I don’t like foreign entities telling us what to do.”

Agema said his bill would protect the “vast majority” of Muslims, whom he contended “come to this country to get away from Sharia.”

The legislation comes at a time of heightened debate about Sharia, a set of religious rules governing personal conduct, family relationships and religious practice for Muslims. Critics fear Sharia could supersede civil law and have an impact on divorce and child custody cases, and similar legislation has been introduced in 25 states.

Some say the bills are unnecessary and pander to anti-Muslim paranoia.

Non-Muslims Snap Up Islamic Bank Accounts

Non-Muslims both in England and in Islamic countries are increasingly opening Islamic bank accounts, which operate in compliance with Sharia law. Under Sharia Islamic law, making money from money, such as charging interest, is usury and therefore not permitted. Wealth should be generated only through legitimate trade and investment in assets. Sharia also forbids investing money in arms, tobacco, alcohol, gambling, and pornography. Non-Muslims find this version of ethical finance increasingly appealing and are therefore opening such accounts at major UK banks.