Shareef Abdelhaleem, accused in Toronto 18, planned to derail bomb plot

Shareef Abdelhaleem testified before a Canadian court that he purposely positioned himself as the middleman of a potentially deadly terrorist plot because he wanted to learn key details about it in case he decided to sabotage it. The member of the so-called Toronto 18 said he was as an “outsider”, and not part of the ‘bombing club,’ which he said was made up of mastermind Zakaria Amara and undercover police agent Shaher Elsohemy, who was to supply bomb making material.

One week ago, Abdelhaleem was found guilty of participating in a 2006 explosives plot to bomb the Toronto Stock Exchange, the Toronto offices of Canada’s spy agency and a military base off Highway 401. Before a conviction is registered, the judge must rule on whether Abdelhaleem was entrapped.

Abdelhaleem was among 18 people charged in the summer of 2006 with belonging to a cell that organized terrorist training camps and planned to blow up buildings with three tones of ammonium nitrate. Amara has been sentenced to life in prison.

Undercover “Toronto 18” agent claims money not a factor

A police agent who was paid $4.1 million to infiltrate the so-called Toronto 18 terror cell told a Brampton, Ontario court that money played no role in his motivation. “The only motive I had was based on my moral and civic responsibilities as a Canadian citizen, testified Shaher Elsohemy at the trial of a Mississauga man charged in 2006 with planning to blow up buildings in downtown Toronto.

Elsohemy pointed out that at the time he had no dire need for money because two of his entrepreneurial ventures, a travel business booking tours to Egypt and renting furnished apartments were successful.

While testifying at the trial of 34-year-old Shareef Abdelhaleem, the former friend turned informant said he was approached by agents with Canada’s spy agency in December 2005 and thought it had to do with his problems flying into the US.

Four men have pleaded guilty, a youth was convicted and seven had their charges stayed. The remaining accused are scheduled to begin their trial in the spring. They are not charged with participating in the bomb plot.
The trial is expected to last until the end of the month.

Police informant paid millions to infiltrate Toronto terrorism group testifies

A police agent who was paid $4.1 million CAD to infiltrate an alleged terror group testified for the first time on the opening day of the trial for Shareef Abdelhaleem, a member of the so-called Toronto 18.

Abdelhaleem, 34, is alleged to have used his friend, undercover police agent Shaher Elsohemy, to set up the purchase of three tones of ammonium nitrate fertilizer, destined for truck bombs targeting sites in downtown Toronto.

This morning, Elsohemy, currently in witness protection, told a Brampton court that he had developed a “strong” friendship with Abdelhaleem and frequented an Islamic school in Mississauga run by the accused’s father. Their relationship was such that the two vacationed together, taking a trip to Morocco in 2005.

“A $4.1 million payoff is pretty steep…It’s unprecedented in Canada,” Abdelhaleem’s lawyer, William Naylor told reporters, adding that’s one of the problems with the case against his client. He went on to suggest that Elsohemy was more concerned with getting money than searching for the truth.