Valls considers ban on foreign funding for mosques

The French government is considering banning the foreign financing of mosques as it reshapes its counter-extremism strategy following a fresh wave of terror attacks.

Manuel Valls, the Prime Minister, told Le Monde the prohibition would be for an indefinite period but gave no further detail on the policy.

“There needs to be a thorough review to form a new relationship with French Islam,” he added. “We live in a changed era and we must change our behaviour. This is a revolution in our security culture…the fight against radicalisation will be the task of a generation.”

Following the murder of a priest by teenage ISIS supporters at a church in Normandy and the Nice attack, Valls said France was “at war” and predicted further atrocities.

“This war, which does not only concern France, will be long and we will see more attacks,” he added.

“But we will win, because France has a strategy to win this war. First we must crush the external enemy.”

The French government has come under increasing criticism for failing to prevent atrocities, including the latest attack in Normandy.

Security services were tipped off that Abdel Malik Petitjean, 19, was planning an attack but police were reportedly unable to identify him from photos and a video showing him declaring allegiance to the so-called Islamic State.

He was already on country’s “fiche S” terror watchlist for attempting to travel to Syria in June but slipped through the net to re-enter France after being stopped by Turkish authorities. Petitjean and 19-year-old Adel Kermiche took six people hostage at a church in Saint-Étienne-du-Rouvray and slit the throat of its priest, Father Jacques Hamel, before being shot dead by police.

Kermiche was also known to security services and was wearing an electronic surveillance tag while on bail as he awaited trial for membership of a terror organisation at the time.

It came less than a fortnight after the Nice attack, when a Tunisian man killed 84 people and injured 300 more when he ploughed a lorry into crowds celebrating Bastille Day.

Mohamed Lahouaiej-Bouhlel was not among the 10,000 names on the “fiche S” but the inclusion of terrorists including several of the Paris attackers, the two Charlie Hebdo gunmen and their accomplice Amedy Coulibaly, as well as a lorry driver who beheaded his manager and attempted to blow up a chemical plant has shown the system to be ineffective.

Intelligence officials have admitted that they are under-resourced to deal with the potential threat from each individual, who would need up to 20 people monitoring them every day.

France’s continuing state of emergency has drastically expanded detention powers, sparking a wave of controversial house arrests since November.

Responding to criticism, Mr Valls said his government would not create a “French Guantanamo” or be swayed by populism.

Christian Preacher in London may hold vital information on ISIS

A Christian preacher in London may hold vital information about a man suspected by the security services of being an accomplice of Jihadi John, the Islamic State murderer.

Daniel Downer, who is not accused of any wrongdoing, was sent a message by Nero Saraiva, who travelled to Syria two years ago. Mr Downer, from Chingford, east London, was asked to provide photographs of Saraiva’s young son, who is thought to live in the capital with Saraiva’s former partner.

It is believed the security services are keen to speak to everyone with knowledge of Saraiva’s movements after it emerged that he appeared to have advance knowledge of an ISIL beheading video.

Jihadi recruits on Volkel

A radicalized ex-military tried to recruit his ex-colleagues for the jihad. The Dutch secret security services MIVD and AIVD are investigating the case.
The ex-military approached his ex-colleagues by mail.
But because of security issues spokesperson of neither the airbase where the ex-military worked or the security services can give any information on this issue.
On social media are circulating different profiles of Muslim radicals who say to have gained military experience inside the Dutch armed forces. And even though it is never confirmed by Defence it is suspected that Volkel is the only place in the Netherlands where nuclear weapons are being stored.

British citizen appears in ‘war crime’ execution video

A British citizen fighting in Syria is believed to have committed a war crime by taking part in the execution of a prisoner. A video that has been made public shows a rebel fighter, thought to be from London, firing a weapon repeatedly into a man who has his hands bound. A note that accompanies the video – which was uploaded to the photo and video sharing service Instagram – says the victim is “one of Bashar’s dogs”, a reference to supporters of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad. It adds that the man admitted to killing four people and raping a woman.

 

The chilling footage is likely to reinforce the fears of UK security services that British citizens fighting in Syria pose a serious threat if they ever return, due to the likelihood that they will have been radicalised by the war.

 

The clip was uploaded by an account linked to the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (Isis) –the most extremist rebel group in Syria. It is thought the incident took place within the last two weeks near the Isis stronghold of Raqqa, in northern Syria. After a fellow rebel shoots the prisoner in the head, the man believed to be the British citizen fires several shots into the prisoner’s body. The murder or ill treatment of prisoners is considered a violation of the Geneva Convention, which defines war crimes.

 

Researchers at the International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation (ICSR), which monitors the activity of British fighters in Syria, identified the gunman as the same person who appeared in previous videos calling on fellow British Muslims to join the fight in Syria. The man goes by the name “Abu Abdullah” and speaks with a thick London accent.

 

A Government spokesman said: “This demonstrates why we have consistently called for the situation in Syria to be referred to the International Criminal Court. Whether this barbaric act is specifically a war crime is for a court to decide. Horrific atrocities have been committed by both the Assad regime and by extremists. The international community must ensure that all those responsible are held to account.”

Morocco: Terrorist Suspect Arrested in Ceuta

19 September 2013

 

Spanish security services on Monday (September 16th) arrested a Moroccan expatriate for allegedly recruiting jihadists to fight in Syria.

Just a few days after the arrest of Mohamed El Bali, a Moroccan expatriate accused of co-ordinating the “Muwahideen” and “Attawhid” cells, another Moroccan terror suspect was arrested in Ceuta.

Yassin Ahmed Laarbi (aka “Pistu”), who has Spanish nationality but is Moroccan by birth, “is the suspected brains behind a network which is actively radicalising, recruiting and sending out Mujahideen to help terrorist groups at work in Syria”, Spanish authorities announced.

“Pistu”, the 39-year-old alleged cell ringleader, is accused of overseeing the training of both Moroccan and Spanish recruits in Ceuta.

The men were part of an international network “dedicated to radicalising, recruiting and sending jihadists to Syria to wage jihad and become martyrs”, a Madrid court said at their arraignment.

The cell reportedly sent an estimated 50 jihadists – most of them from Morocco – to Jabhat al-Nusra in Syria. The network asked them to act as “lone wolves” if they returned to Spain or Morocco, to lead Jihadist attacks in France or the United Kingdom, the minister added.

Right-wing terrorism by the National Socialist Underground – A dossier by the Coordination Council of Muslims

Nov 2012

 

In 2012, the Coordination Council of Muslims has summarized the chronology of the National Socialist Underground (NSU) murders and the reactions to these crimes in a dossier, which is available in German, English and Turkish. The role of the government and its security services in the present is critically analysed. The council claims to re-establish the trust of its citizens and in particular its Muslim citizens in the intelligence services, which was lost as a result of the NSU acts of terrorism. Without this trust it is not possible to feel safe and at home in Germany. Growing Islamophobia and racism in the public are further critical references of the council.

 

NSU_Dossier_Englisch

Expectations and reactions to the Integration Summit

May 28

 

 

Kenan Kolat, head of the Berlin-based Turkish Community in Germany, expressed the demand to hire more migrants in civic services. Kolat defined Germany as an Immigration country that needs more migrants. Migrants are still understaffed in ministries, administrations or in the police. With reference to the NSU trials and the failures of the security services, Kolat proposed to discuss about racism in a future summit. Institutional and structural racism would be part of today´s reality  in Germany.

 

Woolwich murder probe: suspect Michael Adebolajo held in Kenya in 2010

One of the suspects in the Woolwich murder case was arrested in Kenya in 2010, the Foreign Office has confirmed. It said Michael Adebolajo was arrested there and it gave consular assistance “as normal” in the circumstances. He was believed to have been preparing to fight with Somali militant group al-Shabab, a Kenyan government spokesman told the BBC, and was later deported. Confirmation of Michael Adebolajo’s arrest in Kenya in 2010 -preparing, according to the Kenyan authorities, to train and fight in Somalia – raises troubling questions. British security officials have had long-standing concerns about the risk of young men travelling to join the militant group, al-Shabab, and returning to pose a danger on the streets of the UK.

Earlier this month, when David Cameron hosted a conference on Somalia he said the challenges of terrorism and extremism “matter to Britain – and to the whole international community.”

So you might have expected Michael Adebolajo to have been firmly on the radar of the security services when he returned to the UK. They will now be under renewed pressure over exactly what they knew about him, and whether more could have been done to prevent the killing of Drummer Lee Rigby.

Islamist insurgent group al-Shabab is affiliated to al-Qaeda and is thought to have 7,000 to 9,000 fighters. It killed 76 people in a double bomb attack in Uganda as they watched the 2010 World Cup.

Dutch AIVD Information Prevents al-Qaeda Attack

April 16 2013

 

Dutch security service AIVD has said in a briefing to MPs that it passed information on to foreign security services which helped foil an al-Qaeda attack. According to the briefing the information gathered at the end of last year led to the “arrest of three al-Qaeda terrorists who were sent to Europe to carry out the attack”. In a statement to parliament, Home Affairs Minister Ronald Plasterk gave no further details. “We have to protect our sources and cannot go public with our successes” a spokesman told the broadcaster.

Two suspected accomplices arrested in Merah shootings

France 24 – December 4, 2012

French police arrested two people in connection with the attacks by extremist gunman Mohamed Merah, whose shooting spree in and around the southern city of Toulouse this year left seven people dead. One man described by police as a member of the traveller community who converted to Islam was detained on suspicion of having provided aid to Merah in carrying out the March attacks that shocked France.

He was arrested without incident at his home in the town of Albi, about 70 kilometres (45 miles) northeast of Toulouse, where he was to be taken for questioning, police sources said. His former partner was arrested separately at her home in Toulouse, with police saying she may have been aware of his involvement and failed to inform authorities.

Since his shooting spree, it has become clear that Merah had been on the radar of France’s security services for years and that authorities under-estimated the extent of his radicalisation following his trips abroad. French intelligence services have been heavily criticised for failing to realise the threat posed by Merah.