RCMP asked to help prevent Islamic radicalization

Canada Free Press – June 21, 2012

B’nai Brith Canada has called on the RCMP (Royal Canadian Mounted Police) and the Calgary police to monitor next weekend’s Power of Unity conference organized by the Muslim Council of Calgary, and in particular, the scheduled address by conference headliner Bilal Philips. Philips is an Islamic lecturer who has reportedly expressed anti-Semitic and homophobic views including a call for the murdering of gays. He has been banned from a number of countries due to concerns regarding radicalization of Muslim youth and allegations concerning links to terrorism.

Port Coquitlam, British Columbia Mosque Vandalized

News Agencies – March 10, 2011
The Coquitlam RCMP (Royal Canadian Mounted Police) and the B.C. hate-crime team are investing a report of a racial slur spray-painted on the side of a mosque and Islamic cultural centre in Port Coquitlam.
“Any graffiti can have a negative impact on how safe people feel in their neighborhood, and it’s much more disturbing when the graffiti is a racial slur,” said Const. Kristina Biro in a press release. “We encourage anyone that sees criminal or suspicious activity to report it to police.”

Alberta, Canada man arrested for involvement with Al Qaeda

RCMP (Royal Canadian Mounted Police) officers arrested a 38-year-old Alberta man for his alleged role in the multinational terrorist group that carried out the bombing at Forward Operating Base Marez in Mosul, Iraq. Faruq Khalil Muhammad Isa was taken into custody at the request of U.S. authorities.

The arrest followed a joint FBI-RCMP investigation into a “Tunisian foreign-fighter facilitation network” that sent Tunisians to Iraq through Libya to carry out suicide attacks against U.S. and coalition forces. Mr. Muhammad Isa faces a possible life sentence.

Canadian Muslims Respond to Royal Canadian Mounted Police Bust

News Agencies – August 26, 2010
Canadian Muslim leaders were variously stunned, outraged and wary at news from Ottawa that the RCMP had broken up an alleged terrorism cell with suspected links to al-Qaeda. Few details were released about the people rounded up in the bust, but they are suspected of planning a terrorist attack in Canada and authorities anticipate more arrests.
“It’s sad to hear such news. It’s disturbing,” said Imam Habeeb Alli, secretary of the Canadian Council of Imams. The Muslim Canadian Congress expressed “shock” at the developments and commended RCMP for the operation.
The Ottawa case is considered the most significant counterterrorism operation in Canada since the 2006 Toronto 18 arrests. The ringleader in the Ottawa case allegedly attended training camps in Pakistan and Afghanistan. Similarly, in the Toronto 18 case, ringleader Fahim Ahmad was linked with a network of extremists stretching from Canada and the United States to Pakistan and the Balkans.

Royal Canadian Mounted Police Crackdown on Radical Muslim Cleric

The RCMP’s senior counterterrorism officer has singled out radical preacher Anwar Al-Awlaki as a common thread among young Canadian extremists. Assistant Commissioner Gilles Michaud said Awlaki, a Yemeni-American terrorist leader, had been popping up during investigations of “the individuals that are of concern to us.”

The RCMP has been investigating radicalized Canadians who have travelled to such countries as Somalia and Pakistan for terrorist training. The move followed similar measures enacted by the United States and the United Nations Security Council, which placed Awlaki on its list of individuals associated with al-Qaeda. From members of the Toronto 18 to the Somali-Canadians in Al-Shabab, many of those involved in terrorist groups share a fascination with Awlaki, who has been in hiding somewhere in Yemen since 2007.

Discrimination of Muslim Man by Royal Canadian Mounted Police

The RCMP engaged in racial and religious discrimination when it expelled a Muslim man from its cadet academy, the Federal Court of Appeal has ruled, paving the way for the man’s return to training 11 years after his dismissal. The decision upholds a finding by a Canadian Human Rights Tribunal in 2008 that Ali Tahmourpour, 37, faced verbal abuse and hostility from instructors, ridicule over his wearing of religious jewellery, and poor performance evaluations while enrolled in the RCMP’s Regina cadet academy .

Ruling his termination was based “discriminatory assessments of Mr. Tahmourpour’s skills” and that the decision to prevent his return to the academy was “based in part on his race, religion and/or ethnic or national background,” the tribunal ordered Mr. Tahmourpour’s reinstatement. But the Mounties challenged that decision last year in Federal Court, where a judge set aside the order and sent the complaint back to the Tribunal for a rehearing. Mr. Tahmourpour appealed that judgment to the Court of Appeal, where Justice Karen Sharlow this week upheld the Tribunal’s 2008 ruling, stating the RCMP’s “discriminatory treatment of Mr. Tahmourpour denied him the opportunity to complete his training at the Depot and to make his living as an RCMP officer.”

Toronto Muslims hold information session with Mounties

The 20 or so participants hesitate before entering the basement of Anatolia Islamic Centre in Mississauga, Ontario. Most of them come to the mosque every day for prayer. This is the first time they are joined by national security officers from the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP). All of the attendees, mostly middle-aged Muslim men and a few women of mixed ethnicities, are here to take part in the RCMP citizen’s academy course, a get-to-know-your-local-law-enforcement workshop that will cover such things as Internet safety, immigration and recruitment.

The national security arm of the RCMP created the academy in 2005, a few months before the terror bust and arrest of the Toronto 18, as a way to give Muslim leaders and community members a venue to air counter-terrorism concerns and dispel misconceptions about how the RCMP operates.

Canada denies passport to citizen in the Sudan on no-fly list

Supporters of Abousfian Abdelrazik — a Canadian citizen blacklisted as a terrorist and stranded in Sudan — accused the federal Conservative government of racism for refusing to issue him an emergency passport to fly home to Montreal.

Foreign Minister Lawrence Cannon considers Abdelrazik a national security threat. The refusal represents a reversal of the government’s written promise to issue Abdelrazik an emergency passport if he had a paid-for ticket home.

Abdelrazik remains stranded in the lobby of the Canadian embassy in Khartoum, where he has lived for nearly 11 months. Abdelrazik was added to the list in 2006 by the Bush administration. He has been cleared of any terrorist or criminal involvement by both the RCMP (Royal Canadian Mounted Police) and CSIS (Canadian Security Intelligence Service).

The news has also created controversy in the House of Commons. “The government is now in violation of the Charter of Rights and Freedoms,” said Liberal MP Irwin Cotler.

Royal Canadian Mounted Police Search for Quebec Man who Urges al-Qaeda attack on Canada

Counterrorrist officials in the province of Quebec are searching for a man who has posted messages on the Internet forum called Minbarsos encouraging al-Qaeda to attack Canada. Under the pseudonym of Altar, the man wrote on September 25th, “the Canadian government supports the Americans. The government of Canada supports Israel. Canadian soldiers are sent to Afghanistan and Iraq. Now it’s Canada’s turn.”

The RCMP arrested a Moroccan man in Trois-Rivieres, Quebec last September for allegedly posting messages on the Web threatening terror attacks in Germany and Austria.

A similar case is reported by the Globe and Mail of a Tunisian man, Abderraouf Jdey, who received his Canadian citizenship in 1995, and is believed to have left Canada in November 2001. The U.S. government posted a $5-million reward for his capture after a martyrdom letter and video messages from him were found in the Kabul home of Osama bin Laden’s military lieutenant.

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Probe into Maher Arar Torture Case Closed

Canadian federal police (the RCMP, Royal Canadian Mounted Police), has closed its investigation into the source of the damaging leaks to the media about Maher Arar, a Canadian citizen deported to Syria by U.S. officials because of false allegations of terrorism. This statement marks the end of a five-year criminal investigation to examine how inaccurate information claiming Arar was an Islamic extremist was leaked by government sources to the media. The source of the leak could not be determined. In 2007, Arar received $10.5 million CAD in compensation from the Canadian government. The U.S. government has not apologized and keeps his name on a security watch list.

In an interview with the CBC (Canadian Broadcasting Corporation), former RCMP commissioner Giuliano Zaccardelli stated that in the wake of the 9/11 terror attacks, the Bush administration “threw out the rule book” when it came to cooperating with its allies.

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