Islamophobic candidates are big losers in 2012 election

Friday, 11.09.2012, 06:39pm
Several candidates for Congressional elections known for making anti-Islam statements were defeated during this week’s election, much to the delight of American Muslims and tolerant U.S. residents in general who have grown tired of the unwelcoming climate.

“These encouraging results clearly show that mainstream Americans reject anti-Muslim bigotry by candidates for public office and will demonstrate that rejection at the polls,” Nihad Awad, National Executive Director of the Council on American-Islamic Relations, according to the website OnIslam.net.

Candidates known for their hostile, ignorant rhetoric were defeated in several states, another win for tolerance coming off of the failed campaigns of similar presidential candidates such as Newt Gingrich, Herman Cain and Rick Santorum.

Rick Santorum denies questioning Obama’s faith

Republican presidential candidate Rick Santorum on Sunday denied questioning President Obama’s Christian faith but said the president has an environmental belief “that elevates the Earth above man.”

Santorum was quoted Saturday as telling an audience in Ohio that although he accepts the president’s Christianity, he believes Obama adheres to “some phony theology. Not a theology based on the Bible. A different theology.”

Asked to explain on the CBS program “Face the Nation,” Santorum framed the issue as a disagreement over global warming and how “radical environmentalists” care for the Earth.

“I accept the fact that the president’s a Christian,” he said. “I just said that when you have a worldview that elevates the Earth above man, and says that, you know, we can’t take those resources because we’re going to harm the Earth by things that frankly are just not scientifically proven, like for example that politicization of the whole global warming debate, this is just all an attempt to centralize power, to give more power to the government.”

Last month in Florida, Santorum faced criticism when he failed to correct a woman who told him that Obama is “an avowed Muslim.” He was later quoted as saying it wasn’t his job to correct such assertions.

Hindus, Sikhs, Muslims blast Rick Santorum on ‘equality’ comment

Muslims, Sikhs and Hindus are accusing Republican presidential candidate Rick Santorum of bigotry and ignorance after he said that “equality” is solely a Judeo-Christian concept.

“Where do you think the concept of equality comes from?” Santorum said on the campaign trail last Friday (Jan. 20). “It doesn’t come from Islam. It doesn’t come from the East and Eastern religions. It comes from the God of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob.”

CAIR to Santorum: Christians, Jews, Muslims Worship the Same God

WASHINGTON, Jan. 21, 2012 — GOP presidential hopeful claims concept of equality ‘doesn’t come from Islam,’ but from ‘the God of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob.’

WASHINGTON, Jan. 21, 2012 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ — The Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR), the nation’s leading Muslim civil liberties organization, today condemned “inaccurate and offensive” remarks by GOP presidential hopeful Rick Santorum, who said yesterday that the concept of equality “doesn’t come from Islam” or “Eastern religions.” He claimed equality comes from “the God of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob.”

SEE: Santorum Says Equality ‘Doesn’t Come from Islam’ But From ‘God of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob’
In a statement, CAIR National Communications Director Ibrahim Hooper said:

“The Quran, Islam’s revealed text, is the best refutation of Mr. Santorum’s inaccurate and offensive remarks, which are unbecoming of anyone who hopes to hold our nation’s highest office. Christians, Jews and Muslims all worship the same God and share religious traditions that promote justice and equality.

Santorum Fails to Correct “Avowed Muslim” Comment

At a coffee shop today in Florida, the next stop on the Republican carnival tour, Rick Santorum was chatting with voters when a woman asked this question about the President of the United States: “He is an avowed Muslim and my question is, why isn’t something being done to get him out of our government?”

Mr. Santorum didn’t pause. He was not going to let that pass. He summoned all of his political courage and said, “Believe me … I’m doing everything I can to get him out of the government.”

Afterward, Mr. Santorum explained to reporters that “there are lots of people who get up and say stuff in a town hall meeting and say things that I don’t agree with, but I don’t think it’s my obligation, nor should it be your feeling that it’s my obligation to correct somebody who says something that I don’t agree with.”

Rep. Ron Paul To Jay Leno: Rep. Michele Bachmann ‘Hates Muslims’

Rep. Ron Paul may stick to advancing his own positions during debates and letting others do the sniping, but he took a detour on last night’s Tonight Show in a rapid-fire round where Jay Leno asked him to comment on each candidate in term. While he had some nice things to say about Jon Huntsman, his reactions to Newt Gingrich and Rep. Michele Bachmann were particularly harsh, the latter of which he noted “she doesn’t like Muslims… she wants to go get ‘em.”
As it was a quick round of questions, Leno moved on to “thoughtful person” Jon Huntsman before going on to Rick Santorum, who Leno noted that it appeared “gay people, it’s the end of the world for him.” “Gay people and Muslims,” Rep. Paul added.

The rest of the interview centered around Rep. Paul’s semi-feud with Donald Trump, who Rep. Paul noted, somewhat jokingly, that “he was very much offended [by me], so I’m getting a little bit worried,” and whether he would consider a third party run, a question he defined was “way premature.”

Activists ask 2012 candidates to sign religious freedom pledge

An advocacy organization for persecuted Christians has asked the 2012 presidential candidates to sign a pledge stating they would make religious freedom a priority in the United States and overseas if they win the White House.
Open Doors USA joined with religious freedom activist Tom Farr of Georgetown University to draft the pledge, which was unveiled Monday (Nov. 28). As of Wednesday, former U.S. Sen. Rick Santorum, R-Pa., was the sole signatory among the candidates.
“The right of religious freedom must be applied equally to all religious communities in America, including Christians, Muslims, Jews, Hindus, Buddhists, and others,” reads the pledge.
“At the same time, religious freedom does not mandate belief, but protects the right not to believe.”
The pledge calls for the candidate, should he or she become president, to nominate federal judges who support religious liberty. It also asks candidates to make religious freedom promotion a foreign policy priority and urges the appointment of a religious freedom ambassador “who is a person of stature, experienced in matters of religious freedom and diplomacy.”