Man who used Web site to “warn” ‘South Park’ creators sentenced to nearly 12 years

One of the men who had issued “warnings” to the creators of Comedy Central’s “South Park” back in 2010 — saying they risked death if they showed the prophet Muhammad in a bear costume — has been sentenced to nearly 12 years in prison.

Jesse Curtis Morton founded the now-defunct Revolution Muslim Website which he and another defendant, Zachary Chesser, used to deliver threats against Matt Stone and Trey Parker over their show’s 200th and 201st episodes, in which viewers were led to believe Muhammad was disguised in a bear suit — only it turned out to be Saint Nicholas in the costume

Comedy Central censored the episodes when they were telecast in April of 2010, clumsily wiping out the cartoon bear-suited Santa Claus from its scenes. This, in turn, caused Stone and Parker to issue an angry statement complaining of the censorship, which the Viacom-network did after Chesser and Morton posted that the cartoon satirists would likely be killed for their depiction (or not) of Muhammad.

Prosecutor Gordon Kromberg said Morton’s stiff sentence was necessary because his site inspired a variety of would-be jihadis, including “Jihad Jane” Colleen LaRose; Antonio Benjamin Martinez, who plotted to bomb a military recruiting station; and Jose Pimental, who plotted to assassinate members of the U.S. military returning from Afghanistan and Iraq, the AP added.

Operator of radical Muslim site that posted threats to ‘South Park’ creators pleads guilty

ALEXANDRIA, Va. — A Muslim convert from Brooklyn who ran a website that posted threats against the creators of the television show ‘South Park’ for supposedly insulting the prophet Muhammad has entered a guilty plea.

Jesse Curtis Morton, also known as Younus Abdullah Mohammad, was charged last year with communicating threats and has been in custody since his arrest in Morocco in October.

At plea hearing Thursday in federal court in Alexandria, Morton pleaded guilty to conspiracy, communicating threats and using the Internet to intimidate.

Last year another operator of the Revolution Muslim website, Zachary Chesser, was sentenced to 25 years in prison.

South Park Mohammad episode censored

Following warnings of violence, Matt Stone and Trey Parker, the creator of South Park, censored an episode about religious figures including prophet Muhammad. Prior to the airing of the episode, a posting on the website of a US-based group, Revolution Muslim, had warned the creators of South Park that they might face the same fate as Theo van Gogh, a Dutch filmmaker who was murdered by an Islamic militant in 2004. Van Gogh had made a movie in which Islam was accused of violence against women. Comedy Central has declined to comment on the issue.