Germany sees more al-Qaeda online activity

German security officials have seen an increase in al-Qaeda activity on the Internet aimed at radicalizing, recruiting and training potential German-speaking terrorists, an Interior Ministry official said Friday. Stefan Paris, the spokesman for Interior Minister Wolfgang Schaeuble, said that “German security authorities have seen a qualitative increase in al-Qaeda activity on the Internet.” Based on information studied online, Paris told reporters that German officials believe that al-Qaeda has rebuilt itself among the Afghan-Pakistani border region. “We have very clearly seen that al-Qaeda increasingly uses the Internet for three components – a massive radicalization, recruiting and the spreading of technical information on how to carry out a terror attack, including construction of explosive devices.” Paris said. He added that officials were also seeing a “clear focus on Germany,” citing an increase in the number of German-language postings from al-Qaeda over the past year.

Terrorist cell sentenced

A Belgian court convicted five Islamist militants of belonging to a group that was active in recruiting suicide bombers into Iraq. Bilal Soughir, currently in detention, was sentenced to ten years in prison for being a ringleader of the operation. Four other men tried in absentia were also sentenced for organizing and aiding the plans, with sentenced from 28 months to five years.

Six Men under Arrest in Toulouse

Six men were arrested on October 23, 2007 in Toulouse (Lot), presumably affiliated to a jihadist network recruiting men to go to Iraq. The men were between 25 to 45 years old and are now in the custody of authorities. One of them is accused of training for combat members of the same network who had been arrested last February in Ari_ge and Toulouse.

Expelled from Egypt, Free in France

No charge. In the end, France had no complaint against eight supposed islamists expelled from Egypt last week. All were freed. The group was arrested in mid-Novmeber in a Cairo neighborhood. According to the Egyptian minister of the interior, they were part of a terrorist cell recruiting volunteers in order to incite them to jihad in Iraq. Presented by the Egyptians as a leader, Youri Sorokine, a French convert to Islam, remains detained in Cairo.

Switzerland: Danger of Terrorism Rises in Switzerland

While there is no great threat of Islamic terrorism in Switzerland, its likelihood rose over the last year, according to a recent report by the Swiss federal police. The decentralisation of Islamic terrorism and Europe’s transformation from recruiting and propaganda ground to combat area are two major reasons for this. No act or preparation for an act of terrorism has been legally proven to occur in Switzerland, but the report names several Islamic organisations of concern with advanced operations in the country.

U.S. Case Against Muslim Scholar Is Religious Attack: Defense

By MATTHEW BARAKAT, Associated Press Writer ALEXANDRIA, Va. — The government’s prosecution of a prominent Islamic scholar accused of recruiting for the Taliban in the aftermath of the Sept. 11 attacks is an assault on religious freedom, a defense lawyer said Monday during the trial’s closing arguments. “The government wants you to think Islam is your enemy,” said Edward MacMahon, who represents Ali al-Timimi, 41, of Fairfax. “They want you to dislike him so much because of what he said that you’ll ignore the lack of evidence.” Prosecutors, on the other hand, said al-Timimi is on trial not because of unpopular political or religious views but because he specifically urged his followers to take up arms against U.S. troops just five days after the 9-11 attacks, and because several of them traveled half way around the world with just that intent. “When Tony Soprano says ‘Go whack that guy,’ it’s not protected speech,” said Assistant U.S. Attorney Gordon Kromberg, drawing a comparison between al-Timimi and the fictional mob boss. Al-Timimi, a native-born U.S. citizen who has an international reputation in some Islamic circles, is facing a 10-count indictment that includes charges of soliciting others to levy war against the United States and attempting to aid the Taliban. The jury began deliberations Monday afternoon after hearing two weeks of testimony. If convicted, al-Timimi faces up to life in prison. The government contends that al-Timimi told his followers during a secret meeting on Sept. 16, 2001, that they were obliged as Muslims to defend the Taliban against a looming U.S. invasion. Just days after that meeting, four of those in attendance flew to Pakistan and joined a militant group called Lashkar-e-Taiba. Three of the four testified at al-Timimi’s trial that their goal had been to obtain military training at the Lashkar camp and then cross the border to Afghanistan and join the Taliban. It was al-Timimi who inspired them to do so, the men testified. None Of The Men Actually Made It To Afghanistan. Kromberg said at the trial’s outset that al-Timimi enjoyed “rock star” status among his followers. On Monday he said al-Timimi knew that the men at the Sept. 16 meeting–many of whom had played paintball games in 2000 and 2001 as a means to train for holy war around the globe–would do as he instructed them. “These guys couldn’t figure out how to tie their shoelaces without al-Timimi,” Kromberg said. But MacMahon said that al-Timimi merely counseled the men to leave the United States because it might be difficult to practice their religion in America in a post-Sept. 11 environment. The three men who testified against al-Timimi at trial, he said, are all lying because they struck plea bargains with the government and are hoping to get their sentences reduced in exchange for helping the government. MacMahon said it was two other men, Yong Ki Kwon and Randall Royer, who were the ones recruiting paintball members to join Lashkar-e-Taiba. Kwon, for instance, admitted that he and Royer had met a LET recruiter in the spring of 2001 on a pilgrimage to Mecca. Kwon also acknowledged that Royer had previously trained in Pakistan with Lashkar and that he had frequently encouraged others to join LET well before Sept. 11 and well before the government alleges al-Timimi’s criminal conduct. MacMahon pointed out to jurors that Kwon–one of the four who allegedly traveled to Pakistan at al-Timimi’s urging–had placed 25 phone calls to the other three in the three days before al-Timimi allegedly made his first exhortation on the Taliban’s behalf. The government’s case, MacMahon said, is built on a misperception that Islam is a sinister religion and its practitioners deserve strict scrutiny. “Are you appalled that the federal government is reading the Quran to you” at this trial? MacMahon asked the jurors. The prosecution of al-Timimi “is a fundamental assault on the liberties we all hold so dear. … If you don’t believe our freedoms are under attack by this prosecution, you haven’t been sitting here.” Kromberg disputed the notion that the government was casting aspersions on all Muslims. “Ali Timimi does not speak for all Muslims. Ali Timimi speaks for his sect of Salafi Muslims,” Kromberg said, referring to a sect of the religion often equated to Wahhabism, a puritanical form of Islam practiced by many of the leading clerics in Saudi Arabia, where al-Timimi once studied.

Belgian Terror Suspects Lose Appeal

BRUSSELS – Four men condemned in Belgium in connection with terror-related offences on Wednesday failed in a bid to have their sentences reduced. A Brussels court on Wednesday found that one of the men, Tarek Maaroufi, should actually serve a longer sentence than he had originally received and increased the length of time he should spend in prison from six to seven years. Maaroufi was found guilty of helping to acquire forged papers and of recruiting fighters to be trained at a camp in Afghanistan run by the al-Qaeda network.