Republican Congressman King: terrorists will “Dance In the Streets” with Obama victory

Speaking to a local Iowa radio station, Representative Steve King, a Republican from Iowa, said that terrorist would dance in the streets if Barack Obama is elected president. Just before making that statement, King said I don’t want to disparage anyone because of their, their race, their ethnicity, their name – whatever their religion their father, father might have been. King clarified that his prediction is based on Obama’s pledge to remove troops out of Iraq, and that his heritage and middle name will strike a resonance in people in Muslim countries. In criticizing King, a spokesperson for Obama said that comments such as these have no place in our politics. He also called on Republican nominee John McCain to repudiate them. King is currently backing McCain, though McCain has condemned emphasis on Obama’s middle name, most recently when conservative talk show host Bill Cunningham repeatedly used Obama’s middle name in an introduction for McCain.

Cambridge mullah John Butt takes on radicals with radio

{John Butt, the Muslim chaplain at Cambridge University, has started a radio show broadcast to Afghanistan and Pakistan} From debating in the cloisters of Cambridge to defying fanatics across the wilds of Pakistan’s North West Frontier province – it could be one man’s journey out of the pages of Rudyard Kipling a century ago. Yet with his flowing robes, long white beard and skull cap, John Butt, 57, is at the centre of a very modern struggle in Peshawar, the capital of a province amply supplied with guns and religion. Butt has single-handedly started a groundbreaking radio programme called Across the Border, broadcast over a network of independent stations to listeners in Afghanistan and Pakistan. A public schoolboy and professional broadcaster, a convert to Islam and respected cleric, he has brought his combination of talents to the battle against militants who preach violence in the name of God. Tim Albone reports.

New articleDoes U.S. Tolerate Anti-Muslim Speech? The latest flap: Radio-show host says Muslims should be deported, sparking a backlash

Lu Gronseth listens regularly to WWTC, a conservative talk-radio station in Minneapolis, and even advertises his mortgage-loan business on the station. But when he learned that a nationally syndicated radio show host had told WWTC listeners that Muslims should be deported and made rude comments about what they could do with their religion, Mr. Gronseth pulled his ads from the station. So have at least two other Minnesota businesses, at the urging of the Council on American-Islamic Relations in Washington, D.C., as have a handful of national companies, including OfficeMax, JCPenney, Wal-Mart, and AT&T. But the comments by host Michael Savage in October – and previous anti-Muslim speech – have not created the furor that knocked radio icon Don Imus off of MSNBC and CBS Radio after he denigrated a black women’s basketball team. That leaves many Muslims-Americans – and non-Muslims like Mr. Gronseth – suspicious that Americans have a double standard when it comes to Islam.

Ramadan radio raps Muslim ignorance of Islam

A nightly radio phone-in show in Paris has opened up a forum for French Muslim youth to ask questions about religious practice. The show is hosted by Ahmed el Keiy, a lawyer-turned-journalist, who invites imams to help answer questions a wide range of topics, from perfume and hair gel, to prayer. Citing a lack of men and women who know how to teach religion properly, illiterate elders, and do-it-yourself Islam, the radio show encourages callers to find a medium between total liberalism and extremism.

Violent Muslims “Overemphasised”

The Mayor of London has condemned what he said was greater publicity given to Muslim extremists over and above non-Islamic groups. Ken Livingstone told BBC radio too much emphasis was placed on Muslim extremism while the vast majority of faiths wanted to live together in harmony. He said a situation had been reached where any comment by politicians on Muslims had “front page coverage”.

Mecca and Main Street

Islam is America’s fastest growing religion, with more than six million Muslims in the United States, all living in the shadow of 9/11. Who are our Muslim neighbors? What are their beliefs and desires? How are they coping with life under the War on Terror? Mecca and Main Street offers illuminating answers to these questions. Gaining unprecedented access to Muslim communities in America, Geneive Abdo traveled across the country, visiting schools, mosques, Islamic centers, radio stations, and homes. She brings these stories vividly to life, allowing us to hear their own voices and inviting us to understand their hopes and their fears. Inspiring, insightful, tough-minded, and even-handed, it will appeal to those curious (or fearful) about the Muslim presence in America. It will also be warmly welcomed by the Muslim community that it depicts.

Talk Show Host Graham Fired By Wmal Over Islam Remarks

By Paul Farhi Washington Post Staff Writer Washington radio station WMAL-AM fired talk show host Michael Graham yesterday after he refused to soften his description of Islam as “a terrorist organization” on the air last month. Graham had been suspended without pay from his daily three-hour show since making his comments July 25. The station had conditioned his return to the midmorning shift on reading a station-approved statement in which Graham would have said that his anti-Muslim statements were “too broad” and that he sometimes uses “hyperbole” in the course of his program. WMAL also asked Graham to speak to the station’s advertisers and its employees about the controversy. But Graham refused both conditions, prompting the station to drop him. According to WMAL, Graham said “Islam is a terrorist organization” 23 times on his July 25 program. On the same show, he also said repeatedly that “moderate Muslims are those who only want to kill Jews” and that “the problem is not extremism. The problem is Islam.” The comments drew complaints and prompted an organized letter-writing campaign against WMAL and its advertisers by a Muslim group, the Council on American-Islam Relations (CAIR) of Washington. The protests led several advertisers to ask WMAL to stop airing their ads during Graham’s weekday show, although the station says it didn’t lose any advertisers amid the controversy. In a statement yesterday, Graham blamed CAIR for his firing and defended his comments: “As a fan of talk radio, I find it absolutely outrageous that pressure from a special interest group like CAIR can result in the abandonment of free speech and open discourse on a talk radio show.” Graham, in an interview last night, said he and the station had reached an agreement on terms of his return last week, but the station called back to withdraw. “It was a done deal,” he said. “They revoked it because, after further consideration, it didn’t contain an apology. And I will not apologize for something that is true.” Chris Berry, WMAL’s president and general manager, disputed Graham’s characterization, saying in an interview that “no one involved in this decision ever had any contact with anyone from CAIR.” Instead, he said, Graham was terminated because he violated station policy and disregarded “management direction” to redress it. Officials at WMAL, which is owned by the Walt Disney Co., had initially declined to take disciplinary action against Graham, defending his comments as part of the overheated rhetoric of talk radio. But that stance began to change as complaints about Graham’s remarks mounted. Graham, 43, is one of several conservative talk hosts featured on the station. WMAL (630 AM) also carries Rush Limbaugh’s and Sean Hannity’s nationally syndicated radio shows. Graham’s WMAL show is not syndicated. The station had hoped to work out an agreement that would return Graham to the air, Berry said, but it was evident by early yesterday that Graham would not agree to the station’s terms. He added in a statement: “Some of Michael’s statements about Islam went over the line — and this isn’t the first time that he has been reprimanded for insensitive language and comments. In this case, as previously, Michael’s on-air statements do not reflect the attitudes or opinions of station management. I asked Michael for an on-air acknowledgment that some of his remarks were overly broad, and inexplicably he refused.” In 1999, Graham was fired from a Charlotte station for saying that the killing of athletes was a “minor benefit” of the Columbine shootings. He apologized the next day. CAIR applauded WMAL’s decision. The organization had asked the station for a retraction or an apology, but “we didn’t get specific on what [Graham] should say,” said Rabiah Ahmed, a spokeswoman. “We were looking for an acknowledgment that his statements were anti-Muslim and hateful, and harmful to our community and our country’s image.” Berry said no permanent replacement for Graham has been chosen because the station until yesterday thought Graham would be returning to work. He said WMAL will try several hosts in Graham’s slot over the next few weeks. Graham has clashed with CAIR in the past. Last year, the group said comments he made on WMAL implicitly advocated violence against Muslims, and it cited him in a campaign called “Hate Hurts America.”

Denmark: Denmark Targets Extremist Media

By Thomas Buch-Andersen A radio station in Copenhagen has had its broadcasting licence taken away for three months after calling for the extermination of Muslims. In the controversial broadcast, Radio Holger presenter Kaj Wilhelmsen said: “There are only two possible reactions if you want to stop this bomb terrorism – either you expel all Muslims from Western Europe so they cannot plant bombs, or you exterminate the fanatical Muslims which would mean killing a substantial part of Muslim immigrants.” Following the London bombs on 7 July, at least three extremist websites have warned that Denmark could be the next target. The reason for such threats is the 500 Danish troops working alongside US and British troops in Iraq. Danish police have warned people to be more vigilant and have put more police officers on patrol. Police are particularly visible in the centre of the Danish capital, Copenhagen, and around the Metro train system. Internet Option On Tuesday, the Danish Radio Licence Commission ruled the programme in breach of the Broadcasting Act and decided to withdraw the station’s licence for three months. So, travel to help your brothers in Falluja and exterminate your rulers if they block your way. Hizb ut-Tahrir flyer But Kaj Wilhelmsen has vowed to fight on. He says he will continue to broadcast on the internet, for which no licence is required. “Local radio is only one type of media and we will use the media available,” he said. The radio presenter also said he would sue the members of the Radio Licence Commission for blocking freedom of speech. In a separate development, Copenhagen Police charged Kaj Wilhelmsen with breaking the anti-racism law which makes it illegal to incite hatred against groups on the basis of religion, race or sexual orientation. Henning Koch, a legal expert from Copenhagen University, told Danish Radio he believed Kaj Wilhelmsen was in serious breach of the anti-racism law and faces a possible prison sentence. ‘Exterminate Your Rulers’ Since the bomb attacks in London, there has been an increased focus on extremist groups in Denmark. Only last week, the spokesman for the Danish branch of Hizb ut-Tahrir, Fadi Abdullatif, was charged with calling for the killing of the Danish government. Danish Hizb ut-Tahrir members Hizb ut-Tahrir is banned in some neighbouring countries On a flyer distributed in Denmark, Hizb ut-Tahrir said: “So, travel to help your brothers in Falluja and exterminate your rulers if they block your way”. Danish Justice Minister Lene Espersen is looking to find a legal way to ban the organisation. Those kind of remarks “have no place in our society”, said Mrs Espersen in November. Hizb ut-Tahrir has already been banned in neighbouring Sweden and Germany. Copenhagen Police is also investigating another extremist group, according to Politiken newspaper. The paper says the group is linked to a Copenhagen mosque and its website provides links to an al-Qaeda recruiting video showing Osama bin Laden calling for the killing of non-Muslims and demonstrating how to build a bomb.

Denmark Targets Extremist Media

By Thomas Buch-Andersen A radio station in Copenhagen has had its broadcasting licence taken away for three months after calling for the extermination of Muslims. In the controversial broadcast, Radio Holger presenter Kaj Wilhelmsen said: “There are only two possible reactions if you want to stop this bomb terrorism – either you expel all Muslims from Western Europe so they cannot plant bombs, or you exterminate the fanatical Muslims which would mean killing a substantial part of Muslim immigrants.” Following the London bombs on 7 July, at least three extremist websites have warned that Denmark could be the next target. The reason for such threats is the 500 Danish troops working alongside US and British troops in Iraq. Danish police have warned people to be more vigilant and have put more police officers on patrol. Police are particularly visible in the centre of the Danish capital, Copenhagen, and around the Metro train system. Internet Option On Tuesday, the Danish Radio Licence Commission ruled the programme in breach of the Broadcasting Act and decided to withdraw the station’s licence for three months. So, travel to help your brothers in Falluja and exterminate your rulers if they block your way. Hizb ut-Tahrir flyer But Kaj Wilhelmsen has vowed to fight on. He says he will continue to broadcast on the internet, for which no licence is required. “Local radio is only one type of media and we will use the media available,” he said. The radio presenter also said he would sue the members of the Radio Licence Commission for blocking freedom of speech. In a separate development, Copenhagen Police charged Kaj Wilhelmsen with breaking the anti-racism law which makes it illegal to incite hatred against groups on the basis of religion, race or sexual orientation. Henning Koch, a legal expert from Copenhagen University, told Danish Radio he believed Kaj Wilhelmsen was in serious breach of the anti-racism law and faces a possible prison sentence. ‘Exterminate Your Rulers’ Since the bomb attacks in London, there has been an increased focus on extremist groups in Denmark. Only last week, the spokesman for the Danish branch of Hizb ut-Tahrir, Fadi Abdullatif, was charged with calling for the killing of the Danish government. Danish Hizb ut-Tahrir members Hizb ut-Tahrir is banned in some neighbouring countries On a flyer distributed in Denmark, Hizb ut-Tahrir said: “So, travel to help your brothers in Falluja and exterminate your rulers if they block your way”. Danish Justice Minister Lene Espersen is looking to find a legal way to ban the organisation. Those kind of remarks “have no place in our society”, said Mrs Espersen in November. Hizb ut-Tahrir has already been banned in neighbouring Sweden and Germany. Copenhagen Police is also investigating another extremist group, according to Politiken newspaper. The paper says the group is linked to a Copenhagen mosque and its website provides links to an al-Qaeda recruiting video showing Osama bin Laden calling for the killing of non-Muslims and demonstrating how to build a bomb.