Apologies for racist remark

Flemish Sport Minister Bert Anciaux is calling upon the chairman of Football Club Brussels, Johan Vermeersch, to implement an anti-racism policy. Anciaux believes that this is the only way that Vermeersch can make up for his insensitive remarks. Vermeersch is accused of telling a Congolese player that he should go climb a tree and eat a bunch of bananas – he has since apologized.

Ethnic statistics find an opening

The use of an ethnic-racial reference is becoming a possible prospect in France, with the intent of studying the trajectories of immigrants, the children of immigrants, and their degrees of inclusion and discriminations they may face. Introduced in May by the Demographic National Institute, the objective to ask questions and seek answers about demographic grown in France, although some see the project as a way to propagate stereotypes about skin colors, racism, and codify the uncategorical.

Ireland: Hustling to Find Classrooms For All in a Diverse Ireland

A new school in Balbriggan, Ireland opened recently as an emergency measure when officials realized they had no school for local children – almost all Irish-born children of immigrants. Just north of Dublin, the Braken Educate Together National School serves the town’s wave of immigrants from Africa, the Middle East, and Eastern European countries. The opening of the school led to headlines across Ireland, as the mostly black school was cited by critics as an example of racism, apartheid and that the Catholic Church was excluding children. Others cite this as a misunderstanding, and a community’s rushed decision to plan a much needed educational facility.

Fifty Percent of Belgians Want Headscarf Ban

One in three people in Belgium is bothered by women wearing headscarves in public spaces. Over half would prefer that they be banned in certain places. Intolerance and racism are at the root of negative views on headscarves. This was the conclusion drawn by the religious faculty’s Center for Psychology at the Catholic University of Louvain-La-Neuve after two studies into Belgians’ attitude towards headscarves. Some 69 percent of those questioned see the headscarf as a sign of oppression and 53.3 percent thinks wearing one goes entirely against modern western values. Some 44.6 percent are disturbed by someone wearing a headscarf at school. The researchers said that this study is evidence that society still has a long way to go in the fight against racism and intolerance.

Report on Racism and Xenophobia in the Member States of the EU

Executive summary: This report on racism and xenophobia in the EU is the first to be published since the creation of the European Union Agency for Fundamental Rights (FRA) on 1 March 2007, following the extension of the mandate of the European Monitoring Centre on Racism and Xenophobia (EUMC). This report, although published by the FRA, is not the FRA Annual Report. It is a report which was produced on the basis of the EUMC legal base and mandate. It covers information and developments on racism and xenophobia in the EU for the year 2006, in the thematic areas of legal issues, employment, housing, education, and racist violence and crime. In addition, there is a final chapter covering developments and policies at the EU level in combating racism and xenophobia.

Arab American, Muslim Groups Disturbed By Ports Security Rhetoric

By DEEPTI HAJELA NEW YORK — The political piling-on over a state-owned Arab business’ plan to run some American ports is causing concern among Arab American and Muslim American groups, which say the furor is fueled by racism and bigotry. “We’re very concerned about the level of rhetoric and the way that there seems to be the assumption that because a company is Arab it can’t be trusted with our security,” said Katherine Abbadi, executive director of the American-Arab Anti-Discrimination Committee of New York.

Mosques Conflicts in Western Europe

The Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies (JEMS) publishes the results of first-class research on all forms of migration and its consequences, together with articles on ethnic conflict, discrimination, racism, nationalism, citizenship and policies of integration. Contributions to the journal, which are all fully refereed, are especially welcome when they are the result of comparative research, for example within Europe or between one or more European country and the countries of North America and the Asia-Pacific. The journal tends to focus on advanced industrial countries and has distinguished associate editors from North America and the Asia-Pacific.

Denmark: Denmark Targets Extremist Media

By Thomas Buch-Andersen A radio station in Copenhagen has had its broadcasting licence taken away for three months after calling for the extermination of Muslims. In the controversial broadcast, Radio Holger presenter Kaj Wilhelmsen said: “There are only two possible reactions if you want to stop this bomb terrorism – either you expel all Muslims from Western Europe so they cannot plant bombs, or you exterminate the fanatical Muslims which would mean killing a substantial part of Muslim immigrants.” Following the London bombs on 7 July, at least three extremist websites have warned that Denmark could be the next target. The reason for such threats is the 500 Danish troops working alongside US and British troops in Iraq. Danish police have warned people to be more vigilant and have put more police officers on patrol. Police are particularly visible in the centre of the Danish capital, Copenhagen, and around the Metro train system. Internet Option On Tuesday, the Danish Radio Licence Commission ruled the programme in breach of the Broadcasting Act and decided to withdraw the station’s licence for three months. So, travel to help your brothers in Falluja and exterminate your rulers if they block your way. Hizb ut-Tahrir flyer But Kaj Wilhelmsen has vowed to fight on. He says he will continue to broadcast on the internet, for which no licence is required. “Local radio is only one type of media and we will use the media available,” he said. The radio presenter also said he would sue the members of the Radio Licence Commission for blocking freedom of speech. In a separate development, Copenhagen Police charged Kaj Wilhelmsen with breaking the anti-racism law which makes it illegal to incite hatred against groups on the basis of religion, race or sexual orientation. Henning Koch, a legal expert from Copenhagen University, told Danish Radio he believed Kaj Wilhelmsen was in serious breach of the anti-racism law and faces a possible prison sentence. ‘Exterminate Your Rulers’ Since the bomb attacks in London, there has been an increased focus on extremist groups in Denmark. Only last week, the spokesman for the Danish branch of Hizb ut-Tahrir, Fadi Abdullatif, was charged with calling for the killing of the Danish government. Danish Hizb ut-Tahrir members Hizb ut-Tahrir is banned in some neighbouring countries On a flyer distributed in Denmark, Hizb ut-Tahrir said: “So, travel to help your brothers in Falluja and exterminate your rulers if they block your way”. Danish Justice Minister Lene Espersen is looking to find a legal way to ban the organisation. Those kind of remarks “have no place in our society”, said Mrs Espersen in November. Hizb ut-Tahrir has already been banned in neighbouring Sweden and Germany. Copenhagen Police is also investigating another extremist group, according to Politiken newspaper. The paper says the group is linked to a Copenhagen mosque and its website provides links to an al-Qaeda recruiting video showing Osama bin Laden calling for the killing of non-Muslims and demonstrating how to build a bomb.

Denmark Targets Extremist Media

By Thomas Buch-Andersen A radio station in Copenhagen has had its broadcasting licence taken away for three months after calling for the extermination of Muslims. In the controversial broadcast, Radio Holger presenter Kaj Wilhelmsen said: “There are only two possible reactions if you want to stop this bomb terrorism – either you expel all Muslims from Western Europe so they cannot plant bombs, or you exterminate the fanatical Muslims which would mean killing a substantial part of Muslim immigrants.” Following the London bombs on 7 July, at least three extremist websites have warned that Denmark could be the next target. The reason for such threats is the 500 Danish troops working alongside US and British troops in Iraq. Danish police have warned people to be more vigilant and have put more police officers on patrol. Police are particularly visible in the centre of the Danish capital, Copenhagen, and around the Metro train system. Internet Option On Tuesday, the Danish Radio Licence Commission ruled the programme in breach of the Broadcasting Act and decided to withdraw the station’s licence for three months. So, travel to help your brothers in Falluja and exterminate your rulers if they block your way. Hizb ut-Tahrir flyer But Kaj Wilhelmsen has vowed to fight on. He says he will continue to broadcast on the internet, for which no licence is required. “Local radio is only one type of media and we will use the media available,” he said. The radio presenter also said he would sue the members of the Radio Licence Commission for blocking freedom of speech. In a separate development, Copenhagen Police charged Kaj Wilhelmsen with breaking the anti-racism law which makes it illegal to incite hatred against groups on the basis of religion, race or sexual orientation. Henning Koch, a legal expert from Copenhagen University, told Danish Radio he believed Kaj Wilhelmsen was in serious breach of the anti-racism law and faces a possible prison sentence. ‘Exterminate Your Rulers’ Since the bomb attacks in London, there has been an increased focus on extremist groups in Denmark. Only last week, the spokesman for the Danish branch of Hizb ut-Tahrir, Fadi Abdullatif, was charged with calling for the killing of the Danish government. Danish Hizb ut-Tahrir members Hizb ut-Tahrir is banned in some neighbouring countries On a flyer distributed in Denmark, Hizb ut-Tahrir said: “So, travel to help your brothers in Falluja and exterminate your rulers if they block your way”. Danish Justice Minister Lene Espersen is looking to find a legal way to ban the organisation. Those kind of remarks “have no place in our society”, said Mrs Espersen in November. Hizb ut-Tahrir has already been banned in neighbouring Sweden and Germany. Copenhagen Police is also investigating another extremist group, according to Politiken newspaper. The paper says the group is linked to a Copenhagen mosque and its website provides links to an al-Qaeda recruiting video showing Osama bin Laden calling for the killing of non-Muslims and demonstrating how to build a bomb.