Anjem Choudary controversy sparks debate over TV censorship

Anti-terror law reviewer David Anderson QC says broadcasters should decide whether to show radicals on their channels. Channel 4 and the BBC were criticised last week for giving Anjem Choudary airtime in the wake of the Woolwich attack. Radical speakers such as the Islamist preacher Anjem Choudary should not be banned from appearing on television, the independent reviewer of terrorism legislation said on Wednesday. Broadcasters including Channel 4 and the BBC were criticised last week for giving Choudary airtime in the wake of the Woolwich attack and it has been reported that extremist preachers could be banned from television under new powers for Ofcom.

 

British Government strips a Muslim man’s nationality

27 October 2012

 

Mahdi Hashi, a Somalia-born British citizen has been deprived of his British nationality and may never return to Britain. He is thought to be held in an African prison. In the recent years the government has been empowered with a controversial law which does not require a court order to deprive an individual of all his rights as a British national.

 

According to the media reports, the majority of the people who have been affected by this law are Muslim Britons. The deprivation of citizenship order that Hashi received says Mr Hashi had lost his rights to live in the UK for the ‘public good’. It also includes that ‘The Security Service assess that you have been involved in Islamicist extremism and present a risk to the national security of the United Kingdom due to your extremist activities.”

 

Geoffrey Robertson, QC, prominent human rights barrister, said: ‘The increase in orders under this Government of depriving British people of their citizenship on non-conducive grounds is a matter of concern because it is always very difficult to challenge fairly. It means people are being deprived of their rights as a British citizen on the say-so of security officials who can’t be challenged in court.”

 

Human rights groups are concerned that Hashi may now be held at Camp Lemmonier in Djibouti where the Americans have built a large base to combat terrorist groups across the continent.

 

Anti-terrorism laws targeting Muslims ahead of the London Olympics

29 June 2012

 

According to the media reports, the arrests were based on a tip-off after men were seen behaving suspiciously close to the Olympic venue. The two suspects were detained under the Terrorism Act 2000 on suspicion of the commission, preparation or instigation of acts of terrorism and held at a central London police station.

 

However, the police have been under heavy criticism for allowing police to exercise excessive powers thus leaving scope for abuse. In addition, the great majority of those who have been arrested under the Terrorism Act 2000 have been released without charge.

 

On the other hand, David Anderson QC, The Government’s Independent Reviewer of Terrorism Legislation is working towards ensuring that Muslims are not wrongfully arrested during the Olympic Games in London amidst fears that the police may abuse their powers under the Terrorism Act 2000.

De Menezes “killed without warning”

The Scotland Yard men who shot dead Jean Charles de Menezes did not identify themselves as police officers before opening fire, according to three witnesses who saw the Brazilian electrician being killed. The evidence, given by passengers who were in the same train car as Mr. de Menezes when he was shot in July 2005, contradicts statements made by the Metropolitan Police.

Both of the armed officers who shot de Menezes have told the inquest they shouted “armed police” before firing. This claim has also been corroborated by other officers who were on the train on the day de Menezes was killed. But three witnesses have said there was no such alert. Their testimonies appear to lend weight to the accusation levelled by Michael Mansfield QC representing de Menezes’ family that the Metropolitan Police officers had “embellished, exaggerated, and lied.”

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Fraudster was informant in botched Forest Gate raid

Scotland Yard’s botched anti-terrorist operation in Forest Gate, east London, which led to the shooting of an innocent Muslim man, was based on the word of petty criminal serving a sentence for dishonesty offences unconnected to terrorism. Official sources have told The Independent on Sunday that prison officers believed the informant was “operating out of his league”. Yet Special Branch continued to give him special phone favours even after his intelligence proved false. The raid in 2006, involving 250 officers, worsened community relations and sparked a national debate on police tactics. Scotland Yard, backed by the Government and the police watchdog, the Independent Police Complaints Commission (IPCC), has always maintained it had credible and specific intelligence. But the informant and his information were never independently assessed. The revelation will further undermine the Government’s case for extending police powers to detain terror suspects without charge from 28 to 42 days. Leading lawyers say alarm bells should ring when intelligence is received from prisoners. Hugh Tomlinson QC, an expert in claims against the police, said: “It’s extremely unreliable, because they’re willing to say anything to help their own position.”http://themuslimweekly.com/newsdetails/fullstoryview.aspx?NewsID=EE95FC29AA3A194A5AE8CAB6&MENUID=HOMENEWS&DESCRIPTION=UK%20News

Alleged would-be suicide bombers made ‘martyrdom videos’

Six Islamic fanatics recorded violent martyrdom videos as they prepared a terrorist attack on transatlantic aircraft, a court heard today. The gang’s leader told Western leaders to “stop meddling in our affairs” or body parts will be left “decorating the streets”, a jury heard. Another alleged bomber’s video message appeared to address the British public, accusing them of being too busy watching EastEnders and Home And Away to “care about anything”. Prosecutors said defendant Abdulla Ahmed Ali was willing to carry a home-made liquid bomb aboard a flight to north America and detonate it himself. Ali is one of eight men on trial accused of conspiring to murder and to endanger aircraft at Woolwich Crown Court in south-east London. They deny the charges. Prosecutor Peter Wright QC said the gang considered other targets in addition to at least seven flights leaving from London Heathrow airport within hours of each other. He said there was evidence Canary Wharf, a gas pipeline between Belgium and the UK, chemical companies, oil refineries and other UK airports were possible targets. The jury also heard how the gang stockpiled materials for their home-made liquid devices which were to be smuggled on to aircraft disguised as 500ml soft drinks.

‘Terror gang leader urged UK attacks’

The leader of a gang of trainee terrorists said he wanted to see “six or seven atrocities” before the 2012 Olympics, a court has heard. Mohammed Hamid, 50, also allegedly praised the 9/11 hijackers as the “magnificent 15”. Woolwich Crown court later heard that the four men convicted of the July 21 failed bombings attended camps and meetings organised by Hamid. Five men are on trial accused of links to a plot to conduct terrorist training camps in the UK. They deny the charges. David Farrell QC, prosecuting, said the men undertook exercises during a trip to the New Forest while pretending to hold guns. Footage of an earlier visit to the New Forest, shot by one member on his mobile phone, was shown to the jury.