US Air Force veteran, finally allowed to fly into US, is now banned from flying back home

Secret, unaccountable no-fly lists are one of many weapons the US government uses to extra-judicially punish American Muslims

OKLAHOMA CITY — A Muslim U.S. Air Force veteran, who had trouble entering the country last year to visit his ailing mother, was barred Wednesday from boarding a flight in Oklahoma City to return to his home in Qatar.

Saadiq Long, an American citizen, told The Associated Press he attempted to board a Delta flight at Will Rogers World Airport but was denied a boarding pass.

But now Long – unbeknownst to him – has once again apparently been secretly placed by some unknown National Security State bureaucrat on the no-fly list. On Wednesday night, as Associated Press first reported, he went to the Will Rogers Airport in Oklahoma City to fly back home to Qatar. In order to ensure there were no problems, his lawyer sent the FBI a letter ahead of time notifying them that Long would be flying home on that date (see the embedded letter below).

Long’s lawyer, Adam Soltani of the Oklahoma chapter of the Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR), was with him at the airport and repeatedly asked agents why this was happening and who they should contact. He got no answers, except was told to contact the FBI. But both the FBI and Delta refused to comment to AP, while TSA spokesman David Castelveter would only say this:

“It’s my understanding this individual was denied a boarding pass by the airline because he was on a no-fly list. The TSA does not confirm whether someone is or is not on the no-fly list, as that list is maintained by the FBI.”

Long said he had been visiting his mother, who suffers from congestive heart failure, for several months. He was attempting to return to Qatar, where he lives with his wife and children and teaches English. He intended to travel via Amsterdam.

Long said last year he also had difficulty entering the country and that the FBI harassed him and his sister after his arrival. The harassment stopped after Long requested a Department of Justice inquiry, Soltani said.

Long and his CAIR lawyers have thus far been told nothing about why he is barred once again from flying.

Al-Jazeera hopes Current TV purchase will give it access to more American homes

Since its launch in 2006, al-Jazeera TV’s English-language news channel has racked up prestigious journalism awards for its reporting on international issues, including the Arab Spring uprisings. The problem: Hardly anyone sees al-Jazeera English (AJE) because few cable TV operators carry it.

On Wednesday, al-Jazeera’s owner — the emir of the oil- and natural gas-rich Persian Gulf state of Qatar — sought to change that.

Al-Jazeera will pay an undisclosed sum — unconfirmed reports said $500 million — for Current TV, the little-watched but widely distributed cable network co-founded by former vice president Al Gore. Al-Jazeera doesn’t want Current for its name or programming; it wants Current’s entree into American households. Al-Jazeera will start a new channel called al-Jazeera America that will produce news for and about Americans. It will instantly have access to about 50 million cable homes that Current reaches, more than 10 times AJE’s distribution.

 

The deal could mark a new era in a new hemisphere for a news organization that helped smash government control of information in the Arab world. Al-Jazeera — the name means “the peninsula” in Arabic — transcended national censors when it began broadcasting across the Middle East via satellite in 1996.

But its attempts to enter the rich media markets of the West haven’t been quite as revolutionary.

 

A plan to help blighted suburbs meets French resistance due to suspicions over benefactor

News Agencies –November 11, 2012

 

As Europe is engulfed in crisis, Qatar has been on a global spending spree, buying stakes in luxury brands, acquiring soccer club Paris St. Germain and financing London’s “Shard” — the EU’s tallest building. Now, to the consternation of the French, the emirate wants to make a major humanitarian investment in the West. Permeating the hostile response was suspicion that the tiny Muslim state may have a special agenda at a time when fears of terrorism by Islamist extremists and a perceived infiltration of Muslim culture in French life have been on the rise.

 

Far-right leader Marine Le Pen called the Qatari investment an “Islamist Trojan horse” while independent politician Nicolas Dupont-Aignan, who champions national sovereignty, said France would be “prostituting itself” by accepting the money.  Now, a year after their visit to the palaces of Doha, the 10 who bucked a system that has failed the suburbs worry the money may never reach those they hope to help — ordinary people from their neighborhoods with big ideas bereft of any hope of backing.

 

Two French presidents tried to figure out how to deal with the Qatari offer, first conservative Nicolas Sarkozy and now socialist Francois Hollande — who last month confirmed the compromise of spreading the funds across all neglected regions.

3.000 euros fine for 4 councilors of the Plataforma per Catalonia after attending a soccer match wearing a burka

20 June 2012

The Department of Interior has fined 4 councilors and 19 supporters of Plataforma per Catalonia (PxC) with 3,000 euros each, for going to a match of FC Barcelona and L’Hospitalet in burqas. The incident occurred during a match of the Copa del Rey on November 9, 2011 when a group of people appeared in the area of L’Hospitalet wearing burkas and a banner reading ‘First the home ones’.
PxC leader whose hallmark is the radical fight against illegal immigration, has insisted that the protest is directed specifically to criticize the sponsorship of ‘Qatar Foundation’ to the soccer team FC Barcelona.

Controversial Canadian Muslim preacher deported from Kenya over security concerns

The National Post – Feb 24, 2012

Controversial Canadian Muslim preacher Bilal Philips has been deported from Kenya due to security concerns, hours after he landed in the country for a speaking tour, Nairobi newspapers have reported. “We had to turn him away because he easily mobilizes people using his controversial teachings wherever he goes,” said Njiru Mwaniki, chief of the Anti-Terrorism Police. “This is dangerous to our country.”

A Jamaican-Canadian and now a resident of Qatar, Bilal Philips is a contemporary Islamic scholar, teacher, speaker, and author. Philips founded the Islamic Online University as a completely tuition-free institution that is offering an online intensive, undergraduate, and graduate courses in Islamic Studies. The university offers a four year bachelor of arts degree in Islamic studies program.

Le Pen slams Qatar for investing in French ‘Muslim’ suburbs

News Agencies – January 15, 2012

French Far-right presidential candidate Marine Le Pen lashed out at Qatar for investing in “Muslim” areas of French cities and for taking over Paris Saint-Germain football club. “I think this situation could be very dangerous,” she said. “We are letting a foreign country choose its investments with regard to the religion of this or that part of the French population or of French territory.”

The tiny but very wealthy Gulf state of Qatar late last year set up a 50-million-euro ($67-million) fund for entrepreneurs from France’s often-deprived suburbs to set up businesses. Le Pen said that in general Qatar was “playing a double game” by presenting itself as an “enlightened” country while at the same time supporting Islamist groups in the Middle East and North Africa.

German President Wulff Appeals to Fight Prejudice

11.12.2011

On his trip to Doha, Qatar, the German President Wulff has called on Muslims and Christians around the world to tackle existing prejudices and unite in a fight against violence. According to Wulff, religious pluralism was an important foundation for a peaceful coexistence in diverse societies. In particular religious leaders should make some efforts to improve mutual respect. Wulff made his appeal during the “Alliance of Civilizations”-meeting in Doha, an initiative by the United Nations to combat mutual suspicion, fear and misunderstanding between Islamic and Western societies.

Muslim countries financing mosques in Spain

The Spain’s National Intelligence Centre (CNI) leaked to El País newspaper a “secret report” about the external founding received by some Muslims communities in Spain.  According to the report, the Spanish government is struggling to stop the flow of tens of millions of dollars to Islamic groups in Spain from different Islamic countries as Kuwait, Libya, Morocco, Qatar, Oman, Saudi Arabia or the United Arab Emirates. The CNI relates these donations to the presence of some groups in Spain linked with different Islamic movements as Salafism or Muslim Brotherhood.

 

Anti-gay speakers at Muslim conference during Pride

The Toronto Star – June 30, 2011

Toronto’s gay community will celebrate Pride on downtown streets on July 3, 2011. At the same time, Muslims attending a major Islamic conference at the nearby Metro Toronto Convention Centre will hear from two anti-homosexual speakers.
Journey of Faith is the same annual event that drew criticism last year for inviting a televangelist, whose speech was later cancelled, who expressed solidarity with Osama bin Laden and disparaged homosexuals and other groups.
Bilal Philips, a charismatic Jamaican-Canadian religious scholar who embraced Islam in 1972 in Toronto, where he was raised, has advocated death as a punishment for males who “confess” to homosexual behaviour, or are seen performing homosexual acts by four reliable witnesses, in countries governed by Islamic law. The word of the Qur’an must be followed in Islamic countries, he said, and the Qur’an says gays must be killed.

The leader of the conference argued that controversial speakers are entitled to freedom of speech. Philips, 63, said he attended Jarvis Collegiate and Northview Heights high schools in Toronto. Now a resident of Qatar, he was expelled from Germany in April and denied entry to England in 2010.

Qaradawi unable to attend annual meeting of ECFR in Dublin due to ill-health

23 June 2011

Yusuf Qaradawi (b. 1926), the prominent Egyptian-born Islamic scholar who is based in Qatar and considered to be the spiritual head of the Muslim Brotherhood, cancelled his participation at the annual meeting of the European Council of Fatwa and Research (ECFR) to be held in Dublin next week due to ill-health. The secretariat of the ECFR is based in the premises of the Islamic Cultural Centre of Ireland, in Clonskeagh, South Dublin, the largest mosque in Ireland. Qaradawi visited Ireland several times in the past to attend the regular meetings of the ECFR, held in Dublin.