Clinton Warns Against ‘Inflammatory, Anti-Muslim Rhetoric’

The day after the deadliest mass shooting in American history, presumptive Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton warned against the possibility of future attacks and went after Donald Trump for “inflammatory” rhetoric.
“The threat is metastasizing,” Clinton said in a speech in Cleveland. “We saw this in Paris, and we saw it in Brussels. We face a twisted ideology and poisoned psychology that inspires the so-called lone wolves: radicalized individuals who may or may not have contact and direction from any formal organization.”
NPR.org: http://www.npr.org/2016/06/13/481896759/clinton-the-threat-is-metastasizing

Spain offers to change the law to prevent the full adoptions of Islamic minors

28 March 2013

The Spanish Government is prepared to amend the law of adoption to assure that the Guardianship of Alawites minors granted to Spanish families do not become full adoptions under Spanish law.

This guardianship system – typical of Islamic countries – involves a commitment to take charge of the protection, education and maintenance of an abandoned child, but does not confer the right to descent or succession. Moroccan legislation imposes on the families a series of requirements, such as their commitment to respect the child’s full name, nationality or religion until adulthood.

“What the Moroccan authorities really want, explains El-Otmani, the Morrocan Minister of Foreign Affairsis is a mechanism that will enable them to track how that child is doing”; that allows them to “control, verify that the child has a normal situation in education, psychology and health” culturally and religiously speaking, he adds.

 

Turkey: Turkish Youth Have Multiple Identities

In a recent study about the political identities of Turkish youths, Selçuk Şirin finds that Kurdish youths feel more discriminated against than other Turkish youths, whereas young Armenians in Turkey do not feel more political pressure than Turks of the same age. Jan Felix Engelhardt spoke to the New York-based professor of applied psychology about his findings.

According to Dutch professor, Islam is contributing to “delinquent behavior”

According to Corine de Riuter, professor of forensic psychology in Maastricht, Islam is possibly one of the causes of delinquent behavior of Moroccan youth. De Riuter, together with others, has mapped out ways to deal with Moroccan youth and presented their findings to the justice ministry. According to De Riuter, Moroccan and Turkish youth are “backwards” in their moral development. This backwardness is one of the factors that can cause criminal behavior, and cause these youth to have decreased moral functions. “In Islam the emphasis is on obedience and respect for the parents. Individualism and independence are less important – and these are exactly the qualities which can bring moral development to a higher level,”according to the co-authors of the knowledge base for dealing with criminal Moroccan youth. They contrasted this to how children grow up in Dutch families, who have a “democratic negotiation style.”

Youth can become addicted to extremism

Islamic extremism should be regarded as a potential addiction for vulnerable young people in the same way as alcohol, drugs or gambling, according to Scotland’s counter-terrorism co-ordinator. Allan Burnett wants to introduce rehabilitative measures similar to addiction support to prevent youngsters from becoming radicalised by fundamentalists, instead of sending them to prison. Speaking on the eve of the first anniversary of the Glasgow airport attack, Mr Burnett told The Herald that he wants to develop restorative justice and early intervention initiatives for young people as part of the strategy to stop future attacks. The Assistant Chief Constable of Fife is clear that there will be no leniency for those committing acts of serious violence. However, for young people susceptible to being led astray by extremist propaganda, he believes the emphasis should be on prevention. For that to work, he wants to build the trust of parents and the wider community so that if they come forward with concerns, their children will not be automatically penalised. “One of the things we are trying to do is early intervention, which we would use in other areas of behaviour to put a stop to it,” he said. “Just like any other perversion, the primary people who will stop (radicalisation) are parents. It happens with people concerned about their kids drinking, taking drugs or gambling. It happens right across the board and we shouldn’t be surprised that sometimes parents don’t have the knowledge or the skill to intervene in a positive way.

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