‘We can’t become a dictatorship’: Protests erupt across the U.S. against Trump refugee ban

Thousands of demonstrators rallied outside the White House and in cities nationwide Sunday to protest President Trump’s refugee ban, as the executive order continued to halt travel in some locations, despite being partially lifted by federal judges overnight.

In addition to Washington, large protests took place in New York, Philadelphia, Boston and Atlanta, and at airports in more than 30 cities.

In downtown Washington, protesters lined Pennsylvania Avenue and filled Lafayette Square. They cycled through a variety of chants, and wielded poster boards bearing messages such as “Islamophobia is un-American” and “Dissent is patriotic.”

The travel ban bars entry into the United States from seven predominately Muslim countries. Despite a federal judge’s ruling late Saturday night, and similar court decisions with varying degrees of power, the Department of Homeland Security issued a statement Sunday that said the agency would continue to implement the travel rule.

Protests against mosque construction in Leipzig

November 7, 2013

 
Members of the Christian Democratic Union party (CDU) have protested against the construction of a mosque in the Northern suburb of Leipzig. Among them is the CDU member Dorothee Dubrau who has initiated an online petition, which has been signed by approximately 3.000 citizens. Local political and religious representatives such as the Evangelical community raised their concerns about the construction of the mosque, whose construction is planned by the Ahmadiyya community. Even the right-wing extremist party NPD used this occasion to organize a demonstration against the mosque.

Meanwhile, CDU Federal parliamentarians criticized the initiative of Dorothee Dubrau, arguing in favor of the mosque construction. The project was approved and legalized months ago. Robert Clemen, parliamentary member of the CDU opposed the initiative, emphasizing that the “freedom of religion would guarantee the peaceful coexistence of religions”.

 

Die Tageszeitung: http://www.taz.de/Streit-um-Bau-einer-Moschee/!127041/

Small Demonstration in Amsterdam Protests Anti-Islam Movie

15 September 2012

 

A planned demonstration involving about 30 people took place on Amsterdam’s Dam Square on 14 September, protesting the American-made film Innocence of Muslims. Local media provided commentary on the movie and the international response of the past week, with Radio Netherlands Worldwide attributing the violent events to “a dismal misunderstanding” in which “the work of an extremist individual [the filmmaker]” is taken as representative of the American nation. Dutch News reports that in anticipation of the demonstration the American consulate on Amsterdam’s Museumplein, as well as two schools in the neighborhood, closed early.

Protests against Ministry of Interior poster campaign

August 28

The Minister of Interior Hans Peter Friedrich has initiated a controversial poster campaign against the radicalization of young Muslim immigrants. The posters look like missing reports, showing young male Muslim migrants: the women in the pictures wear the “hijab”. The reports ask the reader to be aware of the missing person, who might have been radicalized and driven to extreme Islam. The number of a hotline to get advice from the Ministry of Interior is also on the poster. People who are within or close to social circle of Muslims, whether they are friends or relatives, and observe a “radicalization” among them, are invited to contact the hotline.

The initiative has triggered several critical reactions. Aydan Özoğuz, Commissioner for integration and deputy secretary of the SPD, harshly criticized the campaign, which would suggest regarding every Muslim as a fanatic and terrorist.

Kenan Kolat, a representative of the Turkish community in Germany, spoke about a stigmatization campaign, which would distract from the real problem, which in fact is societal racism.

Update: Turkish Protests in The Hague

30 October 2011

Following tensions last week between Turkish and Kurdish communities in Amsterdam, Turks demonstrated peacefully in The Hague on Sunday. The protest was under tight security; some 200 riot police watched the gathering, though wearing no helmets and minimal gear. Organizers had predicted 4,000 participants, but estimates of attendance are placed at between 500 and 700 individuals.

In an event separate from the rally, a dispute between members of the two communities resulted in the arrest of two pro-Turkish demonstrators. 

Demonstrations against mosque in Göteborg

21 May 2011

Protests against a new mosque in Göteborg attracted approximately 150 nationalist and far right wing protesters, and maybe 300 people supporting the mosque. Amongst the initiators of the demonstration against the mosque was Björn Cederström of the newly started Defense Corps for Sweden’s Self-defense. In his speech at the rally he said Muslims force native Swedes to flee their own country and that we must prepare for civil war. Marc Abrahamsson of the National Democrats said Sweden is being occupied by Arabs and Muslims.

There were also representatives from the English Defense League present, while the Swedish Defense League was not allowed to participate as Cederström regards them as being “too Zionistic”.

The demonstrations resulted in quite a rumble and four persons were arrested by the police.

 

Protests around Canada emerge in solidarity with Egyptians

News Agencies – January 30, 2011

About 100 people showed up Sunday afternoon in front of a downtown Montreal high-rise where the consulate general of the Arab Republic of Egypt is located. Expatriate Egyptians and supporters have been gathering for the past several days at the same spot, chanting slogans and singing the Egyptian national anthem, waving Egyptian and Canadian flags and placards and calling for the immediate ouster of Mr. Mubarak, who has had an iron grip on the country for 30 years. Organizers of the Montreal demonstration vowed to return every day until Mr. Mubarak leaves.

There were similar non-violent gatherings over the weekend in several other Canadian cities. No incidents were reported by police. In Toronto on Saturday, an estimated 400 people staged a rally at Yonge-Dundas Square, chanting in Arabic with many hoisting signs that read “Egyptians in, Mubarak out.” In Vancouver, a crowd gathered at Library Square in the city’s downtown Saturday to listen to speakers and express their support for anti-government actions in Egypt.

About 100 turned out for a rally at Churchill Square in front of City Hall in Edmonton on Saturday. In Halifax, about two dozen people were reported to have showed up for a show of support at Victoria Park on Saturday. Another rally was expected to be held Sunday at Halifax’s Grand Parade.

Most Protesters in French Pension Protests Are Suburban Young People

News Agencies – October 19, 2010

Masked youths clad in black torched cars, smashed storefronts and threw up roadblocks, clashing with riot police across France as protests over raising the retirement age to 62 took a radical turn. In the overwhelming majority of cases, the vandals are students, as young as 12 years old. These youth, says the official, are opportunistic and unstructured, forming sporadic groups. The most destructive are armed with makeshift weapons found on the way: a snatched post, or a stolen bicycle are used to smash store windows and then loot them, says a police agent in Seine-Saint-Denis. One of the ‘rioters’ even forgot his notebook in a shop in Seine-Saint-Denis which was looted by 40 people. Fifteen years old and without a police record, he was arrested six hours later at home.

The proximity of the ‘trouble suburbs’ to the marching routes complicates the job of the police, for example, in Nanterre, where rioters gathered to harass the riot police. At the departmental directorate of public security in Essonne, a police officer says that during the protests, high-school and college students from the underprivileged areas (“difficult neighborhoods”) turn into rioters. They put on a hood and start to pelt the police, or burn garbage, or even cars. Then they melt back into the protest march, some changing their clothing so as not to be recognized by the police videos.

Belgian School Term Begins With Protests Over Veil Ban

Dozens of protesters were at schools in Antwerp where authorities have banned girls from wearing the Muslim veil. Approximately 60 people turned up for the start of the school year outside the gates of the Athenee Royal of Antwerp school, where most students are Muslims, carrying banners calling for freedom of choice.

Another 70 protesters assembled at the Hoboken secondary school, also in Antwerp. “This ban is against the freedom of religion and violates the right to an education for young Muslims”, said Samira Azabar, one of the protest organizers.

After the two schools decided on the ban in June an imam in Antwerp called on all Muslim parents not to send their children back to school for the new academic year. Athenee head mistress Karin Heremans said that so far a dozen students decided not to return to school.

The Belgian state is “neutral” rather than secular, leaving the decision on banning or allowing veils to school authorities.

Protesters Gather Outside Islamic Conference Near Chicago

Roughly 500 members of Hizb ut-Tahrir — a global Sunni network with reported ties to confessed 9/11 mastermind Khalid Sheikh Mohammed and Al Qaeda in Iraq’s onetime leader Abu Musab al-Zarqawi — met inside a Hilton hotel in Oak Lawn, Ill., to host “The Fall of Capitalism and the Rise of Islam.”

Hizb ut-Tahrir insists that it does not engage in terrorism. The organization is not recognized by the State Department as a known terror group. Its supporters, however, blasted capitalism while calling for a rise of Islam during Sunday’s conference. “Free market, organization, capitalization — all has failed and brought disaster to America,” said one of the group’s speakers.

Dozens of protesters outside the hotel — many of whom held American flags — shouted as attendees left the conference late Sunday. No arrests had been made.