In the Netherlands, no use in stricter punishment of people going to Syria

Omar H. learned through internet how to make bombs, had put inciting writings and video’s online and prepared himself for going to Syria. He was sentenced to a year imprisonment, four years, four months probation. But he was not convicted of terrorism. This is why he wasn’t sentenced to three years imprisonment as public prosecution (OM) had demanded.

Terrorism expert Bibi van Ginkel doubts if stricter punishments will have the desired effects. Research made clear that people that want to leave for Syria are not held back easily. They are, as a matter of fact, willing to give their own life. It might be that potential jihadi’s will only get angry and thus more radicalized because of stricter punishments.

Update: Continued Reaction to Anti-Moroccan Chant by Dutch Politician

April 3, 2014

 

The impact of right wing politician Geert Wilders’ anti-Moroccan chant before local elections in the Netherlands continues. The public prosecution has released a statement after receiving more than 5,000 formal complaints about the chant. According to the prosecution, decision to prosecute will not be influenced by the volume of complaints. “We look at the contents and what Mr Wilders exactly said and in which context,” the department said in a statement. “In principle, one complaint is sufficient. We will take note that so many have been made but that will not influence what Wilders said or if he committed a crime.”

The department could not say when it will reach a decision regarding whether to prosecute.

Two MPs, one MEP and a selection of local and provincial councilors have broken ties with the PVV since the chant.

AFP via Expatica– http://www.expatica.com/nl/news/dutch-news/5000-police-complaints-against-dutch-populist-wilders_289344.html

Dutch News– http://www.dutchnews.nl/news/archives/2014/04/more_than_5000_make_police_com.php

Dutch Newshttp://www.dutchnews.nl/news/archives/2014/04/new_poll_of_polls_shows_impact.php

CAIR: Fla. Muslim Files Suit Against Feds After Being Imprisoned for Months

December 5, 2013

 

The Florida chapter of the Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR-FL) today announced the filing of a federal complaint against the United States by Irfan Khan, an American Muslim citizen, alleging false arrest, false imprisonment and malicious prosecution.

Khan was arrested and imprisoned for 319 days and made to endure what he describes as “some of the worse conditions imaginable” in solitary confinement in federal prison. The government dropped all charges against Irfan before trial. He is being represented by Morgan & Morgan, P.A. and CAIR-FL.

“Being an American is about having the right to be who you are. We look forward to pursuing justice on behalf of Mr. Khan,” said Michael Hanna, a discrimination attorney at Morgan & Morgan.”The decision to take away someone’s liberties is a serious responsibility. We are seeing a troubling pattern of overzealous prosecution when it comes to the Muslim community. We look forward to a transparent proceeding to reveal the facts,” said Nezar Hamze, spokesman for CAIR-FL.

Morgan and Morgan is a leading personal injury law firm dedicated to protecting the people, not the powerful.CAIR is America’s largest Muslim civil liberties and advocacy organization. Its mission is to enhance the understanding of Islam, encourage dialogue, protect civil liberties, empower American Muslims, and build coalitions that promote justice and mutual understanding.

 

Cair.com: http://cair.com/press-center/press-releases/12282-cair-fla-muslim-files-suit-against-feds-after-being-imprisoned-for-months.html

Dutch Court Jails Man for Plans to Fight in Syria

October 23, 2013

Nos television reports that a Dutch man has been jailed for planning to travel to Syria to take part in armed resistance against President Assad. The court ruled that making preparations to travel to Syria, including buying a plane ticket and collecting funds, can be seen as preparation for murder and is punishable by law. The ruling is significant for the public prosecution department of the Netherlands because until now there has been no jurisprudence on the issue, and this ruling will have implications for other planning to travel to Syria for similar purposes. In addition to jailing one man for a year on these grounds, a second man has been sent to a psychiatric hospital for the same intention.

Dutch Newshttp://www.dutchnews.nl/news/archives/2013/10/dutch_jail_man_for_preparing_t.php

Abu Qatada could face prosecution in UK, says Theresa May

In this piece The Guardian the home secretary, Theresa May, has said police are examining evidence seized over the recent arrest of Islamic cleric Abu Qatada to see if he can be prosecuted in UK courts. Judges at the court of appeal have repeatedly blocked the preacher’s deportation, amid fears he would face an unfair trial based on evidence obtained by torture in his native Jordan. On Thursday she refused to set a timetable on when he would be deported. May has negotiated with the Jordanian authorities to secure assurances about the evidence that would be used in his trial. She is due to launch a UK Supreme Court appeal against her latest rebuff.

 

No Charges for al-Haddad’s Comments in Amsterdam

22 June 2012

 

The public prosecution of Amsterdam will not bring chartes against Haitham al-Haddad for comments made during a debate in the city this spring. The event replaced a symposium at the city’s Vrij Universiteit, cancelled following commotion over al-Haddad’s presence. Anti-Islam campaigner Ehsan Jami called for legal action against al-Haddad, a British-Palestinian expert and controversial figure. Jami’s accusations were based on Al-Haddad’s comment that Sharia law prescribes the death penalty for ex-Muslims. The Amsterdam public prosecution declined to charge al-Haddad, stating that he had not committed any offenses because the conditions which he outlined for applying the death penalty clearly could not occur in the Netherlands.

Dutch MP’s Trial Continues

25 May 2011

 

The trial for Freedom Party (PVV) leader Geert Wilders on charges of inciting hatred and discrimination is concluding and media coverage tracks its closing stages. The public prosecution department called on Wednesday for the politician to be found not guilty on the basis that his remarks are directed against Islam and not individual Muslims. However the trial heard this week from a representative of ethnic minority organizations that Moroccan and other minority groups felt attacked by Wilders and noted a that the attitude towards these communities had ‘hardened’ due to Wilders’ statements.

Wilders’ lawyer is due to make his closing statements on Monday.

 

 

U.S. military tribunal rejects Khadr’s bid for clemency; sentence remains at 8 years

News Agencies – May 26, 2011

 

The U.S. military tribunal that oversaw Canadian Omar Khadr’s war crimes case has refused his bid for clemency, issuing a statement that simply confirms the eight-year sentence he received in a plea deal. Under it, Khadr pleaded guilty last October to five war crimes, among them the murder of a U.S. serviceman during a 2002 firefight in Afghanistan, when the Toronto native was 15. He received a sentence of eight years, with one more to be served in Guantanamo, and seven in a Canadian prison.

 

Khadr had sought to have the sentence reduced, arguing in part that the prosecution had been guilty of “misconduct” regarding the presentation of a key prosecution witness at the October sentencing hearing.

 

Dutch Court Drops Discrimination Case Against Cartoonist

September 21 2010

The Dutch public prosecution has dropped charges against a cartoonist arrested in 2008 on charges of discriminating against Muslims. The department decided that although the cartoons in question do discriminate against Muslims and ‘people with dark skins’ , they have not appeared on the artist’s website since shortly after his arrest. As the complaint was made in 2005 and the artist spent a day and a half in jail following his arrest, the case was determined to be ‘dated’.

US government refused to share Fort Hood evidence with senate

The Obama Administration has refused to share the evidence related to the last year’s Ft Hood shooting with the Senate. Defense Secretary, Robert Gates argues that sharing the evidence with the Senate could compromise the prosecution process. Two U.S. Senators have threatened the Administration to subpoena.