‘Christmas is Evil’: Radical Muslim Group Launches Poster Campaign against Festive Period

December 24, 2010

Fanatics from a banned Islamic hate group have launched a nationwide poster campaign denouncing Christmas as evil.

Organisers plan to put up thousands of placards around the UK claiming the season of goodwill is responsible for rape, teenage pregnancies, abortion, promiscuity, crime and paedophilia. They hope the campaign will help ‘destroy Christmas’ in this country and lead to Britons converting to Islam instead.

The campaign’s organiser is 27-year-old Abu Rumaysah, who once called for Sharia Law in Britain at a press conference held by hate preacher leader Anjem Choudary, the leader of militant group Islam4UK. Former Home Secretary Alan Johnson banned Islam4UK group earlier this year, making it a criminal offence to be a member.

Daily Mail

Guardian Journalist Interviews Paris’ Princess Hijab

The Guardian – November 11, 2010
Princess Hijab is Paris’s most elusive street artist. Striking at night with dripping black paint she slaps black Muslim veils on the half-naked airbrushed women – and men – of the metro’s fashion adverts. She calls it “hijabisation”. Her guerrilla niqab art has been exhibited from New York to Vienna, sparking debates about feminism and fundamentalism – yet her identity remains a mystery.
The Princess’s first graffiti veil was in 2006, the “niqabisation” of the album poster of France’s most famous female rapper, Diam’s, who by strange coincidence has now converted to Islam herself. With the Paris metro protective of its advertising spaces, her work now usually stays up for only 45 minutes to an hour before being ripped down by officials. She has become highly selective, doing only four or five graffiti “interventions” in Paris a year. But each is carefully photographed and has its own afterlife circulating online.

Dutch muslim women launch humorous poster campaign

A Muslim women’s organization in the Netherlands has launched a campaign using humorous posters to combat prejudices about Muslim women. Al Nisa, the organization spearheading the “Really Dutch” campaign, has designed four posters depicting, for instance, a woman in a Delft Blue headscarf about to swallow a herring. As Al Nisa chair Leyla Cakir explains, “We are Dutch as well as Mulsim, so sometimes we do like herring or liqourice or a slice of cheese.”

Swedish politician threatened

Carl P. Herslow, leader of the right wing populist Skånepartiet, have received threats related to a poster distributed by Skånepartiet showing a drawing of a naked Muhammad holding hands with a likewise naked Aisha. Swedish police says they are taking the threats seriously.

Ammar Daoud, representative of a Muslim Organisation in Malmö says the drawing make him and other Muslims sad and that he regards the poster disrespectful and insulting. But, he continues, no one he knows of has threatened Herslow. It’s important, he says, not to react in a way which could “strengthen the racists case.” But they have reported the poster to the police.

Yet another drawing…

The Right wing, populist Skånepartiet (a local party active in Skåne, the most southern county of Sweden) have managed to create a buzz by using a poster showing a drawing of a naked Muhammad holding hands with a likewise naked Aisha. “Is this the kind of marriages we want in Skåne?” reads a text.

Accused of hate speech, Skånepartiets leader Carl P. Herslow says:”We’re attacking Islam, not the people believing in Islam. We consider Islam a dangerous and contagious psycho-social disease.”

More established politicians oppose Skånepartiet’s poster, and appeal to Muslims not to be provoked.

National Front Party gains Ground on Anti-Islamization Platform

Upcoming French regional elections are marked by a particularly incendiary campaign poster that targets the so-called “Islamization” of France. Ahead of the first round of French regional elections, much of the talk on the airwaves is about the drubbing President Nicolas Sarkozy’s ruling UMP party is expected to receive in the polls. But the far-right National Front party has also managed to cause debate – with a new campaign poster featuring the Algerian flag, a veiled woman, and half a dozen minarets shooting out of a map of France. The tagline – “No to Islamism” – apparently targets extreme manifestations of the Muslim religion.

In a recent campaign speech, the National Front’s 81-year-old leader, Jean-Marie Le Pen, denounced mosques that were “growing like mushrooms” in France. Le Pen said the poster was not against Islam and Algeria but against Islamism – and the fact French youth of North African-origin do not appear to be patriotic. The Algerian government has protested against the campaign poster – as has a Swiss advertising agency, which claims the National Front plagiarized from its campaign for a minaret ban in Switzerland. Rights and anti-discrimination groups like SOS Racisme and the Representative Council of Black Associations have also expressed outrage.

National Front Party accused of copying Swiss minaret ban propaganda poster

Several commentators have noted the similarity of Jean-Marie Le Pen’s National Front posters against Islamism in France to those in the anti-minaret campaign in Switzerland in November 2009. Please see the article to compare the images.

Copyright for anti-Islam propaganda?

The French party Front National is advertising their rightwing agenda on election posters that very much resemble those of the Swiss People’s Party (SVP) during their campaign against minaret construction. The SVP’s poster showed a Muslim woman, almost completely veiled in black cloth, next to an “army” of minarets, covering the Swiss flag. The poster of the National Front’s youth organization shows a similar lady next to a map of France, which is also pierced by minarets and additionally bears colors and symbols of Islamic countries’ flags.

Apparently there is a copyright even on supremacy, and so the SVP now claims violation of copyright. Front National assert that the poster was their idea and even postulates that the People’s Party are building on the “achievements” of the Front National. Furthermore, the French party claims, there are only a few images that can be employed to depict the “creeping Islamisation” of France.

Controversy over Turkish and Arabic posters in Netherlands’ election

Several candidates running in the Netherlands’ March 3 local elections have published campaign material in languages other than Dutch, sparking criticism from other campaigners. Turkish and Arabic-language election posters have appeared at various places in the country, as Labour (PvdA), the Christian democrats (CDA), centre-left D66, the Socialist Party (SP) and the leftwing Greens have posters up on which Islamic candidates are seeking their ethnic group’s voting support. The materials were printed by candidates without the permission of their party executive, and other parties have been reluctant to criticize the poster because they also have candidates publishing non-Dutch material.

Nonetheless, Integration minister Eberhard van der Laan has called on all parties to stop producing election campaign posters in other languages because they ‘do not fit in with the message’ that immigrants should learn Dutch. But the city’s Labour party has refused to withdraw leaflets in other languages, Dutch News reports. ‘The reality is that not everyone in Amsterdam speaks good Dutch. But these people should be able to vote as well,’ campaign leader Lodewijk Asscher said.

Swiss court legitimizes hatred-inciting poster

The Swiss Federal Court acquitted coalition partner the Democratic Union of the Center (UDC), a right-wing political party, from charges of its election campaign poster inciting hatred between communities. In the poster, Swiss Muslim citizens are seen worshipping. The superscript over the photo reads “Use your heads,” urging non-Muslim citizens to vote for the party in the face of the “Muslim threat.” The Muslims, photographed whilst prostrating themselves in prayer, came together in Bern in a show of solidarity when the cartoon crisis erupted in Denmark in 2005. Ali Ihsan Aydin reports.