Md. teen pleads guilty to US terrorism charges in Pa. case involving plot vs. Swedish artist

PHILADELPHIA — A teen from Pakistan with a once-bright future in the U.S. pleaded guilty Friday to terrorism charges for helping an American woman dubbed “Jihad Jane” support an Irish terror cell planning to wage a Muslim holy war in Europe.

Mohammad Hassan Khalid had won a full scholarship to prestigious Johns Hopkins University before the FBI arrested him last summer at 17, making him the rare juvenile held in federal custody.

Khalid, now 18, faces up to 15 years in prison after pleading guilty to a single count of conspiracy to provide material support to terrorists. In a secret life online, the high school honors student had agreed to raise money and recruit terrorists for jihad.

Md. teen plans guilty plea in terror case in Pa.; charged with helping woman dubbed Jihad Jane

PHILADELPHIA — A Maryland teenager charged in a global terrorism plot plans to plead guilty in Pennsylvania.
Court papers filed Monday show 18-year-old Mohammad Hassan Khalid is due in court in Philadelphia for a change-of-plea hearing next month.

Khalid was an Ellicott City, Md., high school honors student when he became a rare juvenile arrested and detained by the FBI.

He’s charged with helping a Pennsylvania woman dubbed Jihad Jane raise money and recruits for a Muslim holy war. He pleaded not guilty in October.

His lawyer has declined to comment on the April 2 plea hearing. A prosecutor hasn’t returned a message seeking comment.

5 Muslim immigrants appeal NJ terrorism convictions in deadly Fort Dix plot

PHILADELPHIA — Wiretaps obtained under a Patriot Act provision aimed at gathering foreign intelligence wrongly helped convict Muslim immigrants in a domestic criminal case, defense lawyers argued Monday in U.S. appeals court in Philadelphia.

The lawyers represent five young men convicted of plotting a deadly strike at a New Jersey military base. Prosecutors call evidence in the three-month trial overwhelming and the two wiretaps in question incidental to the conviction.

Prosecutors charged that the Philadelphia-area residents, inspired by al-Qaida, had taken training trips to the Pocono Mountains and scouted out Fort Dix, an Army base in New Jersey used primarily to train reservists for duty in Iraq, and other sites.

Judge: Philadelphia police can bar officer from wearing head scarf

PHILADELPHIA: A federal judge ruled that the city’s police department did not violate the civil rights of a Muslim officer when it forbade her from wearing a head scarf on the job. Kimberlie Webb, 44, who has been on the force more than 10 years, filed a discrimination lawsuit in October 2005 after the department said she could not wear a khimar at work because the religious symbol violated uniform regulations. U.S. District Judge Harvey Bartle III on Tuesday sided with the city and dismissed the lawsuit, ruling that the police department did not discriminate or retaliate against Webb. “Prohibiting religious symbols and attire helps to prevent any divisiveness on the basis of religion both within the force itself and when it encounters the diverse population of Philadelphia,” Bartle wrote. “Under the circumstances, it would clearly cause the city an undue hardship if it had to allow (Webb) to wear a khimar.” In February 2003, Webb told her supervisor that her religion required her to wear the scarf, which covered her hair, forehead, neck, shoulders, and chest. When her request was denied, she filed a complaint with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission.