Officer criticizes prison’s Terrorism Department

Dutch Public Prosecution Service criticizes the strict manner jihad-suspects are being held in detention. Public prosecutor and coördinator counter-terrorism Bart den Hartigh tells that they are are not in favour of the treatment the inmates receive, but they do not determine the rules. The responsibility lies with the Dutch Custodial Institutions, a department of the Ministry of Security and Justice.

Suspects’ attorneys call the way the suspects are treated a form of paranoia, that instead of preventing terrorism, creates a extremist ideology. Examples of this treatment are: visitation of the private areas, staying 23 hours a day in cell and very restrictive contact with the outside world. But those treatments are not legitimate.

According to a spokesperson from the Ministry of Security and Justice the suspects’ complaints are exaggerated. ‘And it’s not a surprise they present themselves as victims’.

Trojan Horse report finds ‘aggressive Islamist ethos’ in schools

July 22, 2014

A leaked report into the so-called “Trojan Horse” plot has found evidence there was an agenda to introduce “an intolerant and aggressive Islamist ethos” into some Birmingham schools. The report, revealed in The Guardian, was ordered by the government after claims some Muslim groups were trying to take control in some schools. The Department for Education (DfE) has said it will not comment on the leaks.

We must acknowledge today that Ian Kershaw’s report shows we have serious governance issues in a small number of schools in east Birmingham because of serious malpractice by members of governing bodies. This has been compounded by the inability of head teachers and other governors to counter this behaviour and by the failure of the city council to intervene to instil proper governance.

The government’s report was compiled by retired senior police officer Peter Clarke, the former head of the Met Police’s counter-terrorism unit. It is due to be published next week. It says he found evidence of “sustained and co-ordinated agenda to impose upon children in a number of Birmingham schools the segregationist attitudes and practices of a hard-line and politicised strain of Sunni Islam”. He also found evidence of a “co-ordinated, deliberate and sustained action to introduce an intolerant and aggressive Islamist ethos into some schools in the city”.

A spokesman for the DfE said: “The allegations made in relation to some schools in Birmingham are very serious and we are investigating all evidence put to us in conjunction with Ofsted and Birmingham City Council.”

Russell Hobby, general secretary of the National Association of Head Teachers, said his union was disturbed by the Clarke review findings but not surprised.

On Tuesday, the board of trustees resigned at Park View Education Trust, which has been at the centre of claims, stating they had been the victims of a “co-ordinated and vicious” attack. The trust has been the focus of allegations made in the anonymous Trojan Horse letter alleging the existence of a clique of hard-line Muslims attempting to seize control of Birmingham schools. The origin of the letter and the intentions behind it has never been determined.

Toddlers at risk of extremism, warns Education Secretary

August 7, 2014

Nurseries are at risk of being taken over by religious extremists, the Education Secretary will warn as she announces that toddlers are to be taught “fundamental British values”. In her first major policy announcement, Nicky Morgan will say that local authorities will be obliged to use new powers to strip nurseries of their funding if they are found to “promote extremist views”. She will also say that toddlers should be taught “fundamental British values in an age-appropriate way” as part of a drive to protect children from religious radicals.

Nurseries that teach creationism as scientific fact will be ineligible for taxpayer funding, under the new rules. Mrs Morgan’s announcement comes in the wake of the “Trojan Horse” plot by Islamist radicals to take over state schools in Birmingham. The scandal involved primary and secondary schools, but this is the first time the Government has warned that children as young as two could require protection from extremists. Mrs Morgan is understood to be concerned about the risks posed to children by nurseries linked to radical mosques or run by Islamic hardliners.

There are also concerns within the Government that councils need greater powers to react when allegations of extremist values are raised. At present, local authorities provide funding to nurseries that meet basic Ofsted requirements, but there is no explicit statement that they must not support providers — such as churches, mosques or charities — with extremist views. There are fears that loopholes leave councils feeling powerless to cut off financing for organisations which they have concerns about. “After Birmingham, we feel it is important to be proactive,” a government source said.

However, sources added that there is no concrete intelligence about individual nurseries that demands immediate action.

For toddlers, the teaching of such values is likely to include learning right from wrong, learning to take turns and share, and “challenging negative attitudes and stereotypes”, it is understood. The rules on creationism will bring nurseries into line with state-funded schools. A government source said: “We are absolutely not saying, ‘you can’t teach Bible stories’.”

Ofsted, the education watchdog, will use the new guidelines in its inspections of nurseries. A consultation will take place in September and Mrs Morgan hopes the rules will come into force in the New Year.

Mrs Morgan described the findings as “disturbing” and said in future teachers would be sacked without appeal if they exposed children to extremism.