Veil of Truth

19 October

In this opinion piece, the philosopher and feminist Andrea Roedig considers the question of what the position of a Western feminist should be with regard to banning the burqa. After explaining the main tendencies that currently exist, she argues for a contextualized understanding of the burqa ban, saying that what might be right for an Arabic country may ultimately restrict women’s right in a European context. For a genuine feminist approach, the best example would be the “niquabitches” in France, who have succeeded in putting off both the secular state, with the upper half their bodies in a burqa, and orthodox Islam, due to their lower half being practically naked.

Ahmadiyya sect recognized by Dutch broadcasters

One of the organizations hoping to broadcast on Dutch radio and television during programming devoted to Islam recognizes the Ahmadiyya sect as a major current in Islam.

The Ahmadiyya sect, popular among many Dutch of Surinamese origin in the Netherlands, is not recognised as Islamic by the main institutions of orthodox Islam.

SMO, one of five broadcasters who applied for the Islamic airtime, expresses in an email leaked this week its willingness to share its hoped-for broadcasting licence with another company, provided that it too recognises Ahmadiyya.

Growth of Salafism in the Netherlands Slows

The growth of Salafism in the Netherlands has slowed, the intelligence service AIVD told Nos TV on September 8.

A 2007 report by the agency warned of the increasing influence of Salafist imams on Dutch Muslims, not because of a call to violence, but because they prevent the integration of Muslims by rejecting Western society. But now ” the growth [of Salafism] is stagnating. It is not leading to wide circulation, and that was in particular our concern,” says Wil van Gemert, director of interior security in the AIVD.

Van Gemert says the AIVD’s earlier worries were ungrounded. ‘Our biggest fear [was] that there was a broad forum where this growth could take place,’ he said. ‘But our main conclusion is that this forum no longer exists.’ The AIVD cites several reasons for the decreased growth of Salafism: local councils and leaders are more aware of the existence of such centres and are refusing financial support, and the Muslim community is also coming out against the movement.