French Council of the Muslim Faith for critical internal reform

French Council of the Muslim Faith

14.05.2013

Following a reformation scandal that has profoundly affected and occupied the French Council of the Muslim Faith (CFCM) over several weeks, some of its leading members have published an open letter on the organisation’s homepage, which calls for a sincere and critical reform of the CFCM.

The letter calls the previous reforms and election as ‘harmful’  as well as futile. They blame the disastrous campaign to be the birth of power-hungry members who tried to take control over the organisation. According to the undersigned, ‘This robbery took place in broad daylight, without any kind of consultation with the CRCM or associations, without any information or collecting wishes, comments, opinions or comments of the faithful or their representatives. This proves, if proof were needed, that our current French Council of the Muslim Faith has nothing to do with the people in whose name it is supposed to act and exploits it to his advantage’.

They further call the current reforms as useless as they do not ‘promote the conditions for evolution by blocking the influx of new sensibilities and preventing the function of a democratic opposition’.

The undersigned call for a true reform and a boycott of CFCM’s early election on June 8 this year.  Amongst the undersigned are mostly leaders of the organisations regional councils.

Union of Islamic Communities of Murcia rejects any act of terrorism and says he did not know the prisoner

23 April 2013

The spokesman for the Union of Islamic Communities in Murcia (UCID-Murcia), Mohamed Reda El Qadi, expressed his opposition to any terrorist act “even in the name of any religion Islamic, Catholic or Protestant.”

Group aims to limit Muslim development of former Catholic school in rural Howard County, Maryland

WESTMINSTER, Md. — A citizens group aims to limit new construction at a former Catholic school complex in rural Howard County that an Islamic community is considering buying.

The Carroll County Times reports that residents of the Cooksville area met Thursday night with a representative from the Dar-us-Salaam community of College Park. The Islamic group is considering moving its mosque and school to the former Woodmont Academy, which closed two years ago.

The citizens group says it will fight a proposed zoning change that would expand the property’s development options to include “institutional and cultural facilities.”

The group’s lawyer says his clients aren’t anti-Muslim. He says they just want to preserve the area’s rural character.

The Islamic community says it hopes to overcome any opposition through its actions.

Controversies Over Mosques and Islamic Centers Across the U.S.

This interactive map shows the locations of 53 proposed mosques and Islamic centers that have encountered community resistance in recent years. Click on a location for a brief overview of the project based on news reports. In many cases, the opposition has centered on neighbors’ concerns about traffic, noise, parking and property values – the same objections that often greet churches and other houses of worship as well as commercial construction projects. In some communities, however, opponents of mosques also have cited fears about Islam, sharia law and terrorism.

While the map shows only projects that have met resistance, many mosques and Islamic centers have been built in recent years with little or no opposition. See, for example, an article in the Chattanooga Free Press about a mosque that opened in August 2012 in Chattanooga, Tenn.

By the end of 2011, there were at least 2,106 mosques in the U.S., according to the U.S. Mosque Study 2011 (PDF), which was sponsored by a variety of research groups and religious organizations. The Mosque Study Project 2000 (PDF), which was conducted a decade earlier using the same methodology, counted 1,209 mosques across the country in 2000. This suggests that more than four-in-ten mosques in the U.S. have opened since 2000.

Protest against the movie about the prophet unites Muslims

30 September 2012

The Islamic Commission ciffers the attendance of the manifestation at around 10,000 people while the local governement presents a number of 700 to 800 people. It was a quiet ride, while several protesters clamored for “respect”.
The Muslims of the autonomous city came yesterday to the streets to show their opposition to the film that makes fun of their prophet and that has caused a wave of protests across the Middle East. Leading the protest, some children carried a banner that read “We greet you, messenger of God ‘. Young people were followed by a column of men and, in the rear end, were women, with a poster asking ‘Respect for all religions’.

Anti-Islamic Activist Dumps $100 K into Tennessee Primary

A new super PAC targeting a Tennessee House primary has raised all its funds from a board member of a local anti-Islamic conservative group who is also the one-time finance chairman of one of the candidates in the race.

Citizens 4 Ethics in Government registered as a super PAC with the Federal Election Commission on July 2. Its first disclosure, filed today, shows that it has raised all of its $105,000 in funds from Andrew Miller, the owner of Nashville-based Healthmark Ventures and a conservative activist who helps lead the anti-Islamic Tennessee Freedom Coalition. The group has spent more than $30,000 so far on the 6th Congressional District primary contest between incumbent Rep. Diane Black (R-Tenn.) and tea party activist Lou Ann Zelenik.

Miller worked briefly with Zelenik’s campaign before quitting abruptly, according to Zelinek’s campaign manager Jay Heine. Zelenik, who has made opposition to the building of an Islamic Center in Murfreesboro, Tenn. a major issue in her campaign, was the executive director of the Coalition before leaving to run for congress.
The Coalition lists opposition to the growth of radical Islam and the promotion of “cultural cohesion” among its goals, among other conservative causes. In April 2011 the group hosted Dutch parliamentarian Geert Wilders as a speaker; Wilders is known across Europe for his anti-immigration and anti-Islamic politics. He has called for the banning of the Quran and called Islam a totalitarian ideology rather than a religion.

Mosque construction continues to attract opposition across U.S.

CHICAGO — In the decade since the 9/11 terrorist attacks, animosity toward Muslims sometimes has taken the form of opposition to construction of mosques and other Islamic facilities. National debate erupted over plans for an Islamic community center that became known as the “Ground Zero mosque” in Lower Manhattan.
In the last five years, there has been “anti-mosque activity” in more than half of U.S. states, according to the ACLU. Some mosques were vandalized — a $5,000 reward is being offered in a 2011 Wichita mosque arson case — and others were targets of efforts to deny zoning permits .
Mosque opponents often raise concerns about traffic and parking, but Daniel Mach, director of the ACLU’s freedom of religion program, says they can be “sham arguments” that mask anti-Muslim sentiment.
“I hope that eventually there will be greater acceptance for all faiths, including Islam,” Mach said.
One thing is clear: The number of mosques is on the rise. In 2010, there were 2,106 mosques in the U.S., up from 1,209 in 2000, according to a study by the Hartford Institute for Religion Research and other groups. A 2011 survey by the Pew Forum on Religion & Public Life estimated there are 2.75 million Muslims in the U.S.

Request to increase the number of teachers of Islam in Melilla

24 May 2012
Coalition for Melilla (CPM), the main opposition party constituted by a Muslim majority, called today for an increase in the number of Islamic religious teachers who teach in inner cities of Melilla, since the actual number does not cover the demand for this type of education.
At a press conference, the Deputy Mohamed Abdelrrahim CPM noted that currently there are eleven teachers of Islamic religion, though it would be necessary to reach 20.

Claims against Islam blocked so far in lawsuit over proposed mosque in Tennessee

MURFREESBORO, Tenn. — Plaintiffs in a civil trial trying to block a proposed mosque in Tennessee on procedural grounds were largely blocked Wednesday in trying to raise claims that Islam is not a real religion and that its followers are violent.

The proposed mosque is one of a few Muslim projects in the U.S. that hit a swell of conservative opposition around the same time as the controversy over a plan to build a Muslim community center near New York’s ground zero.

The plaintiffs want to void a May 2010 meeting of the Rutherford County Planning Commission in which it approved the Islamic Center of Murfreesboro’s site plan. They claim the public was not adequately notified ahead of time.

Because the Islamic Center itself is not named as a defendant, mosque members have not been able to defend themselves against the accusations in court.

How it Became Acceptable to Publicly Reveal Bias Against Muslims in America

Before gauging whether you are in line with most of America in your opinion about Muslim immigrants, here are two things you should know: Firstly, Americans are no more opposed to granting citizenship to Muslim immigrants than Christian immigrants. Secondly, despite no real difference in opinion, Americans are significantly more open about their opposition to a Muslim becoming a citizen. In other words, what is unique is not the extent to which opposition exists, but the extent to which it is out in the open.

About a year ago, in the spring of 2010, with funding from the National Science Foundation’s Time-Sharing Experiments in the Social Sciences program, we decided to see if Americans really felt differently about the incorporation of Muslims into American citizenry. Because the U.S. has a long tradition of religious tolerance, we worried that Americans might feel uncomfortable expressing an intolerant view toward a specific religious group. To get around this, we randomly assigned the 2,366 participants in our study to three groups. One group we asked directly whether they supported or opposed giving legal Muslim or Christian immigrants citizenship. A second and third group we asked about these two religious groups separately and indirectly, never forcing respondents to reveal their opinion to the interviewer or anyone. This approach, called a “list experiment,” has been used to consider other controversial topics such an affirmative action and same-sex marriage. Its unique insight is not just into the level of opposition, but the degree to which it is hidden.