Muslims in Berlin, London, and Paris: Bridges and Gaps in Public Opinion

Gallup’s recent surveys of Muslims in London, Paris, and Berlin point to the need for greater understanding between Europe’s Muslim residents and the broader societies in which they live. But these surveys also offer plenty of evidence that the foundation for that understanding is already in place.

Muslims in Europe: Basis for Greater Understanding Already Exists (April 30, 2007)

Values Questions Set European Muslims Apart (April 27, 2007)

European Muslims Show No Conflict Between Religious and National Identities (April 26, 2007)

Executive Summary (PDF) 

Public Expresses Mixed Views of Islam, Mormonism: Benedict XVI Viewed Favorably But Faulted on Religious Outreach

Summary of Findings

The Muslim and Mormon religions have gained increasing national visibility in recent years. Yet most Americans say they know little or nothing about either religion’s practices, and large majorities say that their own religion is very different from Islam and the Mormon religion.

A summary of this poll and the full report are available for download on the Pew Research Center website.

Attitudes Toward Muslims Mixed in Europe and the U.S.

“A new Financial Times/Harris Poll of cross sections of adults in the five largest European countries and the United States looks at attitudes toward Muslims and finds differing opinions on Muslims as a threat to national security, prejudice towards Muslims and whether parents would object to a child marrying a Muslim.

When it comes to Muslims as a threat to national security, the British are the most wary as 38 percent say the presence of Muslims in their country is a threat, followed by 30 percent of Italians and 28 percent of Germans who believe the same. Approximately one in five French (20%), American (21%) and Spanish (23%) adults also say the presence of Muslims in their respective countries is a threat to national security. With the exception of Spain and Great Britain, where large pluralities say the presence of Muslims does present a threat to national security, majorities of adults in the other four countries say they do not present a threat.

These are some of the results of a Financial Times/Harris Poll conducted online by Harris Interactive® among a total of 6,398 adults aged 16 to 64 within France; Germany, Great Britain, Spain, the United States, and adults aged 18 to 64 in Italy, between August 1 and 13, 2007.

A summary of the report can be found here.

New Opinion Poll About Spanish Muslims

According to a new opinion poll, 83% of the Spaniards think of Muslims as “fanatics” and 58% of them believe that there is a “natural conflict” between being a practising Muslim and living in, and adapting to, a modern society. Spain is the only Western country where the perception of Muslims has gone into “free fall” over the last year: only 29% of Spaniards now have a positive image of Islam and Muslims, as opposed to 46% in 2005. Even more surprising is that 41% think that the overwhelming majority of Muslims who live in Spain (more than one million, including nearly 800.000 Morrocans) support extremists groups, whereas only 12% of Spanish Muslims think that Al Qaida radicals enjoy support within the Muslim community. The distorted image of the Muslims in Spain contrasts with the positive image of the Spaniards among the Muslims: 83% of the Spaniards believe that Muslims in Spain do not respect their wives, while 82% of these Muslims think that the Spanish treat their wives well.