Canadian Convert Opens Hijab Fashion Business

OnIslam: December 1, 2012

 

Finding Islam three years ago, Amanda Redmond, a native of Halifax, Nova Scotia, has launched a new business for hijab fashion to help her fellow Muslim women find appropriate clothes according to her faith.

 

Aspiring to offer her fellow Muslim women a modest fashion, Redmond started her small business on a Facebook profile. Titled Al-Qamar, or The Moon, her new business was named after the 54th sura of the Qur’an. Last September, she launched its official online store and has now garnered more than 1,200 Facebook fans and a growing reputation as a go-to shop for Muslim women. The shop offers an assortment of contemporary clothing and accessories for veiled Muslim women.

La Presse considers non-Quebecois Canadian responses to the niqab

This article in La Presse suggests that the remainder of Canadian provinces would have been less likely than the provincial government of Quebec to expel a niqab-wearing woman in a language class for wearing a niqab. The journalist suggests that students in similar classes in Nova Scotia, Ontario and British Colombia are permitted to keep their niqabs.

Drop in Support for Wilders’ Party

The latest poll by Politieke Barometer indicates that support for Geert Wilders’ anti-immigration PVV party has dropped in the last month. Polls suggested last month that the party would take 32 seats in a parliamentary election, a figure which has dropped to 24.

Meanwhile, research by Synovate for television show Nova shows that almost 40% of Wilders’ supporters back the PVV because they have lost faith in the government and other political parties. Just under 20% support Wilders because of his stand on Islam; the party leader has called for a ban on the Koran and an end to Muslim immigration.

No Prosecution for Website Publishing Danish Cartoons

The Dutch Public Prosecution Department has announced that Geert Wilders and TV program Nova will not be prosecuted for publishing controversial Danish cartoons online. The 12 cartoons depicting Mohammad led to worldwide unrest when published in a Danish newspaper in 2006. The department determined that because the reproduced cartoons target Mohammad and not Muslims in general, they “do not insult Muslims nor incite hatred” and their reproduction is not punishable by law.

However the department will prosecute the pro-Arab Arabische Europese Liga unless it removes a cartoon depicting two Jews inventing the holocaust from its website. That cartoon does ‘insult Jews because of their race and/or religion’ because it implies Jews themselves invented the idea that six million were killed during World War II, the department said. Although the website removed the cartoons earlier, they have since republished them, as chairman Abdoulmouthalib Bouzerda claims that the prosecutor’s office is applying double standards. He adds that “given the decision not to interpret the Muhammad cartoon as offensive to Muslims, the decision that the publication of the AEL carton is liable to prosecution is incomprehensible”.

The thirty Islamist that tried to dash the National Audience are back in the bench

Thirty suspects of the operation Nova (the first violent Islamist attempt since 9/11) -are now appearing before the Spanish National Audience. All of them are accused of conspiracy to perform terrorist attacks, namely the one using a bomb car to explode the building of the National Audience; belonging to an armed group; forgery of official documents; and possession of instruments to falsify credit cards. The suspects are believed to share the jihad-salafist ideas that have been associated with al-Qaeda.

Netherlands: Attitudes towards leaving Islam

Three quarters of Muslims regard turning away from Islam as a personal choice, but there are few that applaud that choice. A survey commissioned by television programme Nova indicates that 38 percent of the Muslims questioned disapprove of apostasy. 24 percent say they cut off all contact with a fellow Muslim who has turned their back on Islam. 6 percent is of the opinion that it is acceptable to use violence against an apostate. The survey presented on Tuesday also indicates that 11 percent of Muslims feel that Ehsan Jami’s committee for former Muslims is necessary. A large majority – 66 percent – does not think his committee serves a good purpose.

Violence Against Apostates Acceptable

THE HAGUE – Three quarters of Muslims regard turning away from Islam as a personal choice, but there are few that applaud that choice. A survey commissioned by television programme Nova indicates that 38 percent of the Muslims questioned disapprove of apostasy. 24 percent say they cut off all contact with a fellow Muslim who has turned their back on Islam. 6 percent is of the opinion that it is acceptable to use violence against an apostate.