Islam is a Religion for Women: New Publication Tre donne: una sfida (Three women: a Challenge)

3/8/2013 tre donne

ANSAmed

 

Nobel laureate Shirin Ebadi, and Biancamaria Scarcia Amoretti both condemn the use of the Islamic faith to suppress women, denouncing those who do this as “tyrants” during a meeting in Rome on women and Islam. The discussion in Rome stemmed from the presentation of Three Women: A Challenge a book which presents an interview with three Muslim women of differing generations and countries, but united by the “challenge” of Islam and its treatment of women.

The author, Marisa Paolucci, interviewed an Iranian woman, Shirin Ebadi, the 2003 Nobel Peace Prize Winner, a Sudanese woman, Fatima Ahmed Ibrahim, the first woman elected to a parliament in Africa, and Malalai Joya an Afghan woman and former parliamentarian. Three profiles, which according to the author illustrate the same thing, that women are respected in Islam. To purchase the book visit http://www.emi.it/schede/2028-2.html

 

Muslim activists’ message to Rutgers: Gender inequality goes beyond Islam

Islam is not the sole cause of inequality between men and women in the Middle East, two human rights activists said. That’s the message Shirin Ebadi, the first Muslim woman and only Iranian to win the Nobel Peace Prize, and Sheikha Haya Rashed Al Khalifa, president of the U.N. General Assembly, sent a crowd of about 300 people at Rutgers University yesterday. “It is very important to inform the world about Islam,” Rashed Al Khalifa said. “Islam can absorb all the differences in the world. Concepts like jihad are against all principles we live and learn, and I can’t make justifications for it because we consider it an illness for our society.” Rashed Al Khalifa, who is from the Middle Eastern island Bahrain, also is a human rights advocate and lawyer. A descendent of the royal family there, she is the third woman and first from the Middle East to take the U.N. General Assembly presidential post.