Montreal Muslims respond to Anti-Islam film

CTV News – September 16, 2012

 

As turmoil spreads across the Middle East, Ottawa closed embassies in Libya, Egypt and Sudan for the day, citing growing protests over an anti-Islam film. The move came after four Americans, including the U.S. ambassador to Libya, was killed in an attack last week. In Montreal, leaders in the Muslim community are condemning the violent reaction to the film. They say the content may be offensive, but it doesn’t justify bloodshed.

During a special inter-faith meal on Sunday, those leaders said it was important to speak out to try and balance negative images of Islam with positive ones. The Canadian Council on American-Islamic Relations also issued a statement this week, calling on Canadian Muslims to ignore the film.

 

“We regard a lot of things as sacred and we do not like it to be dragged down in the mud if you will,” said Farida Mohamed, from the Muslim Community of Quebec. “The trouble is these few inflammatory elements cause havoc for the Muslim world because, let’s face it, in the media Muslims are portrayed very negatively. Muslims are portrayed as terrorists.” The mosque’s president, Mehmet Deger, called for peaceful demonstrations and dialogue. The imam at the Dorval mosque said that he’s grateful that Canadian Muslims seem to be better off than Muslims in America, although tensions do flare from time to time.

Prime Minister Harper says ‘Islamicism’ biggest threat to Canada

CBC News  – September 6, 2011

 

Prime Minister Stephen Harper has said the biggest security threat to Canada a decade after 9/11 is Islamic terrorism. Harper added that Canada is safer than it was on Sept. 11, 2001, when al-Qaeda attacked the U.S., but that “the major threat is still Islamicism.”

 

The prime minister said home-grown Islamic radicals in Canada are “also something that we keep an eye on.” Harper said his government will bring back anti-terrorism clauses that were brought in in 2001 but were sunset in 2007 amid heated political debate. “We think those measures are necessary. We think they’ve been useful,” he said. “And as you know … they’re applied rarely, but there are times where they’re needed.”