Controversy Over the Islamic New Year in Mayotte

Is Mayotte harboring terrorists? A local newspaper recently revealed the departure of four men from Mayotte to wage jihad in Syria, passing through France, an affair which has caused a stir on the island.

On October 26 this concern was amplified following the Islamic New Year. The shiite minority provoked strong reactions, especially “war songs” were sung by young Muslims who are declaring their readiness for jihad.

New York City public school kids getting new Muslim, Lunar New Year holidays

February 4, 2014

 

Mayor de Blasio said Monday that he’d move forward with closing schools for Eid al-Fitr and Eid al-Adha, two Muslim holy days, and for Lunar New Year. But he was hesitant regarding Hindu festival Diwali.

Appearing on WNYC’s “Brian Lehrer Show” on Monday, the mayor said he hadn’t taken a position on whether Diwali, the festival of lights celebrated in India and other South Asian countries, should be a day off from school.

But he said he’d move forward with closing schools for Lunar New Year and for Eid al-Fitr and Eid al-Adha, Muslim holy days.

“It is complicated in terms of logistics and school calendar and budget. But it’s something I want to get done in a reasonable time frame,” he said.

 

NY Daily News:  http://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/education/nyc-public-school-kids-new-holidays-article-1.1601237#ixzz2tY0E5Rjl

Community Action: Muslims Clean up after New Year’s Celebrations

02./ 03.01.2012

At the beginning of the new year, various newspapers (and news magazine) across Germany reported on local Muslim communities that have volunteered on New Year’s Day to help clean up the city centres after New Year celebrations. Especially young Ahmadiyya Muslims have demonstrated their commitment to the community, which some newspapers described as a clear sign of successful integration.

Clumsy Anti-Terror Investigation: Hilal Sezgin’s Novel about Muslims in Germany

1 October 2010

The new novel by Hilal Sezgin begins with a fictional terrorist attack on Germany – an attack that is not only deeply unsettling for the nation, but also for the book’s heroine. In a humorous and light-hearted tone, the German-Turkish writer and columnist tells of coexistence in a nervous society that suspects every devout Muslim of being a potential terrorist.

It is something one hardly dares to imagine: Islamic terrorists carry out an attack during the New Year period. They managed to poison the contents of numerous bottles of sparkling wine before they hit the supermarket shelves. Nine people die as a result of the poison, and countless more have to receive medical treatment. The entire country is plunged into a state of anxiety and fears that other foodstuffs may have been poisoned. Fortunately, this story is not real, but an invention by the writer and journalist Hilal Sezgin, an idea for a clever and entertaining novel on Germany’s relationship with Islam and the Muslim members of its society (“Mihriban pfeift auf Gott. Ein deutsch-türkischer Schelmenroman.” [Mihriban does not care about God. A German-Turkish picaresque novel]).

Death threat against FPÖ politician justifies her attack on Islam

FP_ General Secretary Harald Vilimsky said Wednesday that the Islamic death threat against Graz FP_ politician Susanne Winter had justified her Sunday attack on Islam. Winter had claimed at the FP_’s New Year’s meeting in Graz six days before the municipal election there that the prophet Mohammed had been “a child molester” and written the Koran during “epileptic fits.” A death threat against Winter claiming to be from European Al-Qaeda appeared on the internet on Monday. The head of her party’s list in the January 20 municipal election, she has subsequently received protection from members of the elite Cobra security force. Vilimsky added that the FP_ was awaiting “a clear response” to the death threat from Austrian President Heinz Fischer and SP_ Chancellor Alfred Gusenbauer. The party general secretary declared that he would not distance himself from Winter’s remarks and that Austria needed a tougher policy against radical Islam.

Video Threat After Austrian Politician’s Anti-Islam Comments

A video containing an unspecified threat to Austria was posted on the video-sharing Web site YouTube on Tuesday following anti-Islamic remarks by a hitherto unknown far-right Austrian politician. Police said they were still evaluating the video, but had offered the Graz- based activist, Susanne Winter, personal protection after she denounced Islam’s prophet and Muslim men in general as “child molesters”. Winter had accepted the added protection following her remarks at the weekend, said a spokesman for the interior ministry, Rudolph Gollia. He said the government’s anti-terrorism office was “still in the process of evaluating” the video. Nevertheless, there appeared no reason to increase security in Austria for the time being, Gollia added. The video, lasting four minutes and 48 seconds, contained coverage of a speech Winter made at the traditional New Year’s congress of the populist far-right FPOe party on Sunday. Winter is the FPOe’s candidate for the upcoming municipal elections in the southern city of Graz. The video then showed pictures of the destruction of the World Trade Center in New York on September 11, 2001, and warned: “Look, Susanne, something like this could happen to your country and you are responsible.” “It was a mistake for you to take on … Allah’s warriors,” the video said in German. “We, the Muslims, are those warriors with whom you now have a problem.”

Terror fear cancels Brussels’ New Year’s celebrations

Traditional New Year’s Eve fireworks in central Brussels have been canceled due to a continuing terror threat, officials said. The popular downtown Christmas market closed early on December 31st, rather than staying open all night, and the adjacent skating rink shut down at 8pm. The terror threat is related to a December 21st arrest of 14 people who are accused of plotting the release of accused al-Qaeda militant Trabelsi.

Fresh Faces: He Could Care Less About Obama’s Story

By Reza Aslan Every time I hear about how Sen. Barack Obama is going to “re-brand” America’s image in the Middle East, I can’t help but think about Jimmy Carter’s toast. When the idealistic Democrat came to Iran in 1977 to ring in the new year with Shah Mohammad Reza Pahlavi, the country’s much-despised despot, throngs of young, hopeful Iranians lined the streets to welcome the new American president. After eight years of the Nixon and Ford administrations’ blind support for the shah’s brutal regime, Iranians thrilled to Carter’s promise to re-brand America’s image abroad by focusing on human rights. That call even let many moderate, middle-class Iranians dare to hope that they might ward off the popular revolution everyone knew was coming. But at that historic New Year’s dinner, Carter surprised everyone. In a shocking display of ignorance about the precarious political situation in Iran, he toasted the shah for transforming the country into “an island of stability in one of the more troubled areas of the world.” With those words, Carter unwittingly lit the match of revolution.

Muslim teachers sacked for wearing headscarf

BRUSSELS – Two Muslim teachers from the Brussels public education system have been sacked for wearing an Islamic headscarf. The Muslim teachers were first issued a warning, but continued to wear their headscarves and were later sacked. They have lodged an appeal. The director of the Brussels school group, Jacky Goris, said the dismissal was correct. “In April 2005, the board of management of the Brussels school group decided that teachers, the same as students, were not allowed to wear noticeable religious symbols,” she said. “The two Muslim teachers started the school year in September 2005 in acceptance with the regulation. But around the New Year, they suddenly started wearing a headscarf. That is a breach of contract.” Goris said they could have also chosen for a pragmatic solution. “During the lessons on Islam, they were allowed to wear the headscarf the same as priests may wear a large crucifix during religious lessons.” She added: “Outside the lessons, they could have worn a discreet scarf or a little hat. I would not have had a problem with that either”. Goris denied allegations of discrimination, pointing out that the school had sacked a teacher in 2004-05 after he sent racist emails to students. It said it imposes a policy of “neutrality”. Brussels Education Minister Guy Vanhengel has backed the stance that teachers should not wear noticeable religious symbols. Flemish Education Minister Frank Vandenbroucke said schools should individually decide whether they would allow a headscarf or not. The sacked teachers are fighting their dismissal in the council of appeal, which is made up of a magistrate, supported by two public school staff members who are not part of the Brussels school group. A definitive ruling is expected at the end of this month