Islam is a Religion for Women: New Publication Tre donne: una sfida (Three women: a Challenge)

3/8/2013 tre donne

ANSAmed

 

Nobel laureate Shirin Ebadi, and Biancamaria Scarcia Amoretti both condemn the use of the Islamic faith to suppress women, denouncing those who do this as “tyrants” during a meeting in Rome on women and Islam. The discussion in Rome stemmed from the presentation of Three Women: A Challenge a book which presents an interview with three Muslim women of differing generations and countries, but united by the “challenge” of Islam and its treatment of women.

The author, Marisa Paolucci, interviewed an Iranian woman, Shirin Ebadi, the 2003 Nobel Peace Prize Winner, a Sudanese woman, Fatima Ahmed Ibrahim, the first woman elected to a parliament in Africa, and Malalai Joya an Afghan woman and former parliamentarian. Three profiles, which according to the author illustrate the same thing, that women are respected in Islam. To purchase the book visit http://www.emi.it/schede/2028-2.html

 

New Publication: “Terrorismo e fondamentalismo islamico”

3/8/2013 Terrorismo book

primonumero.it

“Terrorismo e fondamentalismo islamico” Terrorism and Fundamental Islam by Roberto Colella, a Political Scientist and Journalist. An open session with the author and local politicians took place March 8, 2013.

New Publication: Muslims in Paris

“This neighbourhood has always been a neighbourhood of arrivals; people who come and are in need, trying to move into a more welcoming neighbourhood.” —Focus group respondent

Muslims in Paris highlights the everyday experiences and rarely heard voices of Muslims living in the neighbourhood of La Goutte d’Or, situated in Paris’ multicultural 18th arrondissement. The qualitative research reveals that both Muslim and non-Muslim residents share a keen sense of belonging to their neighbourhood, city and country. Challenging common misperceptions as to sources of division and exclusion, the report finds that Muslims and non-Muslims are united by common values—such as family and good neighbourliness—and that it is social and economic factors, not religion, which divides them.

The research offers a unique insight into how some of Paris’ diverse Muslim residents feel about where they live and the opportunities available to them to live as full citizens of France. The report examines the real sources of division, exclusion and discrimination they encounter in daily life, and efforts made to overcome these barriers.

By engaging with communities and policymakers, local experts heading the research explored the primary concerns of Muslim residents in the 18th arrondissement. Issues addressed include education, employment, health, housing and social protection, citizenship and political participation, policing and security, media, belonging and identity.

The report acts on its findings by offering a series of recommendations for local and national authorities, Muslim communities and other minority groups, NGOs and community organizations, the media, and broader civil society.

Muslims in Paris is the eleventh report in the Muslims in EU Cities series produced by the Open Society Foundations At Home in Europe Project. It is the result of research that examines the level and nature of integration of Muslims in 11 cities across Europe (Antwerp, Amsterdam, Berlin, Copenhagen, Hamburg, Leicester, London, Marseille, Paris, Rotterdam, and Stockholm).

New Publication: Muslims in London

“I have grown up here so I believe it is my place. I don’t feel that I am an outsider. This is my country. I had my education here and I am very pleased that I am a British Muslim.”

—Focus group respondent

Muslims in London highlights the complexities around belonging and identity amongst Muslim and non-Muslim residents living in Waltham Forest, one of London’s 2012 Olympic boroughs. The research reveals that that local not national identity is strongest for Muslims in Waltham Forest. The situation is exactly the reverse for non-Muslims in the borough, who feel a stronger attachment to Britain than their neighbourhood.

The research offers the most up to date insight on how Muslims in one of London’s most diverse boroughs really feel about where they live and what’s stopping them from feeling they belong in Britain.

By engaging with communities and policymakers, local experts heading the research explored the primary concerns of Muslim residents in Waltham Forest. Issues addressed include education, employment, health, housing and social protection, citizenship and political participation, policing and security, media, belonging and identity.

The report acts on its findings by offering a series of recommendations for local and national authorities, Muslim communities and other minority groups, NGOs and community organizations, the media, and broader civil society.

Muslims in London is the tenth report in the Muslims in EU Cities series produced by the Open Society Foundations At Home in Europe Project. It is the result of research that examines the level and nature of integration of Muslims in 11 cities across Europe (Antwerp, Amsterdam, Berlin, Copenhagen, Hamburg, Leicester, London, Marseille, Paris, Rotterdam, and Stockholm).

The report and accompanying fact sheet are available for download.

New Publication: “A Mosque on the neighbourhood.”Conflict, public space and urban integration of the Muslim mosques in Catalonia.

The anthropologist, Jordi Moreras, has published his new book “A Mosque on the neighbourhood”. As a result of a research financed by the Jaume Bofill foundation, the book analyse the different mosque conflicts in Catalonia. The author studies the actors involved, in 25 cases of conflict related with the opening of mosques in Catalonia from the 1997.

Edition November 2009, published online in May 2010