Florida girl attacked after wearing hijab to school

February 4, 2014

 

Teen says she has been bullied in school
HAINES CITY, Fla. —A Florida girl said she has been verbally and physically assaulted because she wears a hijab, or head scarf, to school.

Zahrah Habibulla, 14, said she didn’t have problems at school with other children until she started wearing her hijab on Dec. 14. The Polk County teen said she wears the hijab for religious reasons.

“I’ve been bullied in school,” she said. “I had verbal assaults, physical assaults.”

Each time the teen was attacked, she told her mother, who then called the principal of Ridge Community High School.

Zahrah’s parents told WESH 2 News in an exclusive interview that they want something done before their daughter is hurt.

“It breaks my heart. I don’t want to see that,” said Zameena Habibulla. “I’m hoping for a safer school for her. Every day she goes to school I’ve got fear.”

The Polk County School District released the following statement Monday:
“Since learning of these concerns, school officials have taken a proactive role in addressing any issues to ensure the safety and welfare of the student. The School Board remains committed to providing an educational environment that is safe, secure and free from harassment or bullying.”

A member of the American Muslim Youth Leadership Council has also met with the school’s principal to urge action from school officials.

WESH(NBC):  http://www.wesh.com/news/central-florida/florida-girl-attacked-after-wearing-hijab-to-school/-/11788162/24271022/-/x92r5g/-/index.html#ixzz2tXijNW1r

Giuliani Tackles Racial Profiling On NBC: Can’t ‘Ignore’ Threat From ‘Distorted Islamic Extremist Ideology’

In the wake of the Boston bombing, the issue of homeland security is once again at the forefront.Meet the Press, too, discussed the issue of security as David Gregory invited his panel to discuss the current approach, the specific case of the Boston bombing, and whether profiling the Muslim community would be an effective tactic.

“We have to recognize we are still in a global war against radical Islamic jihadists,” Rep. Tom Cotton (R-AR) asserted. “And the president, by his policies and by the words of senior officials in his administration, are removing us from a war footing and putting us back into a law enforcement model.”

Later in the segment, as Sen. Patrick Leahy (D-VT) grew defensive in response to Cotton, Gregory noted that “signals of radicalization” were missed in the case of the Boston bombing, eventually going on ask: Do “we need to sacrifice privacy in order to be safer? Is that going to be the immediate lesson from the Boston bombings?”

First VW, Now Coke: Soda Company’s Super Bowl Ad Being Called Racist By Arab-American Groups

arab_cokeSuper Bowl advertisers have been releasing their commercials earlier and earlier, mostly in an attempt to build social media buzz before the big game. But as advertisers this year are learning, with this new opportunity comes a great deal of risk.

Coca-Cola is running into similar charges of using racial stereotypes from Arab-American groups who are objecting to that company’s use of an Arab man with camels.

But the Arab-American objections to the ad go beyond that simple cliché. In the ad, three groups set off in a race towards a huge bottle of Coke. There is even an interactive element for viewers, who can vote on whether they want the cowboys, bikers or showgirls to reach the bottle first. They cannot, however vote for the Arab man.

Imam Ali Siddiqui, president of the Muslim Institute for Interfaith Studies told NBC News, “The Coke commercial for the Super Ball is racist, portraying Arabs as backward and foolish Camel Jockeys, and they have no chance to win in the world.”

The American-Arab Anti-Discrimination Committee is also up in arms. “What message is Coke sending with this?” asked Abed Ayoub, the group’s director of legal and policy affairs. “By not including the Arab in the race, it is clear that the Arab is held to a different standard when compared to the other characters in the commercial.”

Ayoub is intending to reach out to CBS and Coke about changing the ad, which already has close to 1 million views on YouTube and an elaborate, interactive website. “I want to know why this happened and how can we fix this if possible before Sunday,”

 

Christian Leader, Pat Robertson Blasts, Comedy Show: Tebow Skit Fueled By ‘Anti-Christian Bigotry’

Televangelist Pat Robertson was not laughing at a skit on NBC’s “Saturday Night Live” last weekend that included a Jesus character, played by Jason Sudeikis, telling pro football player and outspoken Christian Tim Tebow to “take it down a notch.”

Robertson, who’s quick to criticize Hollywood entertainment and pop culture, said the comedy sketch is part of “the anti-Christian bigotry in this country that’s just disgusting.”

“If this had been a Muslim country and they had done that and had Muhammad doing that stuff, you would have found bombs being thrown off and bodies on the street,” he said.

Robertson made his comments on the Christian Broadcast Network, where he’s been a regular fixture for decades. The video snippet was first posted on Mediaite.

“Tebow is an example, and I think he is a wonderful human being,” Robertson said. “We need more religious faith in our society. We’re losing our moral compass in our nation and this man has been placed in a unique position and I applaud him. God bless him.”

Arab-American from Michigan crowned 2010 Miss USA

Rima Fakih knew she had won the 2010 Miss USA title when she saw the look on Donald Trump’s face: It was the same one she’d seen him flash at the winners of “The Apprentice.” The 24-year-old Lebanese immigrant — Miss Michigan USA to the judges — beat out 50 other women to take the title Sunday night, despite nearly stumbling in her evening gown. “She’s a great girl,” said Trump, who owns the pageant with NBC in a joint venture.