International Conference: “Islam and Europe: Culture, History, Politics”

ANU COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SOCIAL SCIENCES
8 – 9 March 2012

The Australian National University’s Centre for European Studies and
Centre for Arab and Islamic Studies will be jointly hosting an
international conference exploring the themes of Muslims in Europe and
Europe’s relations with the Muslim world.

Scholars specialising in Islamic and Middle East studies, European
studies, and the wider fields of Humanities and the Social Sciences are
invited to participate in this multidisciplinary forum. Historical
perspectives and contemporary analyses are welcome in the following areas:

– Religious and cultural diversity in Islam;
– Muslims, civil society, democracy and secularism;
– Impact of Islam in European history;
– Impact of recent events in the Middle East;
– Cultural identities and the Arts.

Professor Neal Robinson, Centre for Arab and Islamic Studies

Offers for 20 minute presentations are invited for consideration by 1 September 2011.
Please send presentation title, abstract of 200 words (max.) and short
biography to
Europe@anu.edu.au.

Convenors: Professor Jacqueline Lo, Centre for European Studies and
Professor Neal
Robinson, Centre for Arab and Islamic Studies

Venue: Sir Roland Wilson Building, McCoy Circuit (Building 120), ANU,
Canberra

Enquiries: europe@anu.edu.au

European Muslim Population to Reach 8% by 2030, Report Finds

The number of Muslims in Europe has grown from 29.6 million in 1990 to 44.1 million in 2010. Europe’s Muslim population is projected to exceed 58 million by 2030. Muslims today account for about 6% of Europe’s total population, up from 4.1% in 1990. By 2030, Muslims are expected to make up 8% of Europe’s population. Although Europe’s Muslim population is growing, Europe’s share of the global Muslim population will remain quite small. Less than 3% of the world’s Muslims are expected to be living in Europe in 2030, about the same portion as in 2010 (2.7%).

Call for Papers: “Multiculturalism in a Globalised Society: European Muslims, Identity and Citizenship”

Venue: Park Campus, University of Northampton,
Northampton NN2 7AL, UK

This conference gathers academics, journalists, researchers, policy makers, youth workers, civil society organisations and other members of the public to discuss issues around Muslims in Europe, identity, citizenship and belonging. It aims to address issues relating to Muslims’ engagement or disengagement with the mainstream European society; what challenges are there for their positive participation in the success of the multiculturalism model. It will also aim to map out Muslims’ use of the media and the extent to which that helps define who they are.

Conference themes:

This conference will cover (but not necessarily limited to) the following areas of enquiry:

– European or Muslim: What do Muslims in Europe believe to be their identity?

– Multiculturalism and Integration: What does this actually mean?

– Active citizenship: What does this mean in Islamic terms?

– The relationship between British Muslims and the global Muslim community – the Ummah.

– The rise of political Islam – Islamism

– Post 9/11 Radicalisation and terrorism

– New media and youth/women empowerment.

– Youth subcultures and new media, what is going on?

– What functions are the internet and satellite TV playing in engaging/disengaging Muslim communities?

Call for submissions:
Abstracts of no more than 400 words, along with a short bio should be submitted by the 15th October 2010. Papers should reflect one or more of the conference themes mentioned above. Particularly welcome are papers based on empirical work and a clear research method (s).

Submission deadlines:
Submission of abstracts: 15th October 2010
Notification of acceptance: 3rd November 2010
Submission of full papers: 26th January 2011
Selected conference papers will be published in an edited volume.

Please send all submissions and enquiries to Dr Noureddine Miladi (conference coordinator), E-mail: noureddine.miladi@northampton.ac.uk
Tel: +44 (0)1604 892104

Low support for radicalism among European Muslims

15 September 2010
Support for radical Islamist groups is low among European Muslims and some leading groups with overseas roots are now cooperating with local governments and encouraging Muslims to vote, according to a new report. European groups linked to wider Islamist movements such as the Muslim Brotherhood and Jamaat-i-Islami now focus more on conditions for Muslims in Europe than their original ideologies from Egypt and Pakistan, according to the report by the Pew Forum on Religion and Public Life, on “Muslim Networks and Movements in Western Europe”.
The report also cited tensions between “jihadists” and peaceful Islamists in Europe, saying some groups linked to the Muslim Brotherhood were working with police to counter militants. “By most accounts, support for radical extremist groups is relatively low among Muslims in Europe,” it said. “Nevertheless, such groups have been central to the public discussion of Islam in Europe, especially in recent years.”
The report said supporters of European groups with links to foreign Islamist movements often showed little interest in their founding ideologies, which critics say are radical and anti-Western. Although some groups promoted militant views, others dealt only with religious issues or education, making it difficult to generalise about Muslim organisations in Western Europe.

Muslims in Europe and islamophobia; a workshop of research in progress and symposium

Muslims in Europe and Islamophobia
A Workshop of Research in Progress and Symposium

Presented by MEL-net and ICS in cooperation with
British Council, “Our Shared Europe”

Friday, 28th of May 2010 at ICS-UL

MEL-conference & European Muslim Network Meeting
29-30 November 2007, Lisbon, ICS-UL & Forum Lisboa

Day I: Muslims in Portugal
Day II: Expanding Horizons

Blasphemy, insult and hatred – Finding answers in a democratic society

Mutual understanding and acceptance is perhaps the main challenge of modern society. Diversity is undoubtedly an asset, but cohabiting with people of different backgrounds and ideas calls for a new ethic of
responsible intercultural relations, in Europe and in the world.

This book tries to answer a series of pertinent and poignant questions arising from these issues, such as whether it is still possible to criticize ideas when this may be considered hurtful to certain religious feelings; whether society is hostage to the excessive sensitivity of certain individuals; or what legal responses there may be to these phenomena, and whether criminal law is the only answer.

Re-imagining European Identity Politics and the Social Integration of Muslims

In this timely work, Alexander Castilla deconstructs the myth of the so-called clash of Islam and democracy, and examines the forces involving the social integration and religious accommodation of Muslims in Catalonia, Spain during the aftermath of the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks in the United States and the March 11, 2004 terrorist attacks in Spain. In adapting to the pressures of globalization and to their own religiously plural, yet increasingly secular society, the Catalans sought to strike a delicate balance between the accommodation and integration of Muslims, while building on Catalonia’s nation building project which focused on the historical continuity of Catalan language and culture.

Re-imagining European Identity Politics and the Social Integration of Muslims defines how the claims of immigrant Muslims influence the ongoing construction of a Catalan national identity. It also explores the primary demands for religious accommodation which Muslims sought in the beginning of the 21st century and why it is necessary to separate political and religious powers. Looking at the role of Muslim religious leaders in the context of secular society is of particular significance because the contemporary issues surrounding the separation of politics and religion is far from being resolved not only in Catalonia, but also in greater Spain and in other European countries with significant Muslim communities such as the United Kingdom, Germany, Holland and France.

Re-imagining European Identity Politics and the Social Integration of Muslims represents the first comprehensive study in English about the social integration of Muslims living in Catalonia and combines an historical, socio-political and philosophical analysis about Islam and democracy and contributes to the literature on peace and security studies, as well as to studies of migration, citizenship and nationalism.

Published by VDM Verlag Dr. Müller, the book is now available on Amazon.com.

Muslims in Europe: A Report on 11 EU Cities

The Open Society Institute Muslims in Europe report series constitutes the comparative analysis of data from 11 cities in seven European countries. It points out common trends and offers recommendations at the local, national, and international levels, including to the European Union and to international organizations. While not representative of the situation of all Muslims in these cities, this report does capture a snapshot of the experiences of Muslim communities in select neighborhoods in Amsterdam and Rotterdam, Antwerp, Berlin and Hamburg, Copenhagen, Leicester and Waltham Forest–London, Marseille and Paris, and Stockholm.

This body of work comes in response to major trends with regards to Muslims living in Europe: whether citizens or migrants, native born or newly-arrived, Muslims are a growing and varied population that presents Europe with one of its greatest challenges, namely how to ensure equal rights and opportunities for all in a climate of rapidly expanding diversity.

Muslims in Europe: A Report on 11 EU Cities, by Open Society Institute

The Open Society Institute Muslims in Europe report series constitutes the comparative analysis of data from 11 cities in seven European countries. It points out common trends and offers recommendations at the local, national, and international levels, including to the European Union and to international organizations. While not representative of the situation of all Muslims in these cities, this report does capture a snapshot of the experiences of Muslim communities in select neighborhoods in Amsterdam and Rotterdam, Antwerp, Berlin and Hamburg, Copenhagen, Leicester and Waltham Forest–London, Marseille and Paris, and Stockholm.

This body of work comes in response to major trends with regards to Muslims living in Europe: whether citizens or migrants, native born or newly-arrived, Muslims are a growing and varied population that presents Europe with one of its greatest challenges, namely how to ensure equal rights and opportunities for all in a climate of rapidly expanding diversity.

Muslims in Lille express shock and concern following Swiss minaret ban

This article claims that Muslims in the Northern French city of Lille feel that the recent Swiss ban on minarets sends a very bad message for the acceptance of Muslims in Europe. One man interviewed pointed to the positive incorporation of the Mosque of Paris’ minaret within local architecture.