Muslim and Christian make new Quran translation to show the two religions’ similarities

A Muslim and a Christian have made a new translation of the Quran to underline the similarities between their two religions.

The authors, who are also friends, said they hoped the text would provide “a tool of reconciliation” between Christians and Muslims.

Some 3,000 parallels between the Bible and Quran are demonstrated in the book, which has a split-page format.

Safi Kaskas, the Muslim co-author of the new book, said in a statement: “Most of the tension that exists in the West in the post-9/11 era is because Christians fear Muslims and their book, the Quran.

“This new translation was designed to be a tool of reconciliation between Muslims and the followers of other Abrahamic religions [Christianity and Judaism].

“In an environment of tension, working for reconciliation and peace is long overdue. If we are to prevent a much larger disaster from happening, we must work for a better understanding.”

He said some translations had wrongly given the impression Islam was intolerant of other faiths, saying this was not an accurate interpretation of the holy text.

Mr Kaskas started the project with Dr David Hungerford, a Christian, 10 years ago. The book is part of a project by Bridges to Common Ground, an organisation that aims to reduce Islamophobic attitudes among Christians.

Dr Hungerford said: “We hope this translation will lead people to understand that while there are differences between Islam and Christianity, there is also a tremendous bridge between Muslims and Christians.”

There are more than 100 mentions of Jesus in the text – who is known as Esa in the Quran.

“In today’s society, no one talks about this common ground among the Abrahamic faiths, much of which is centered around the person of Jesus of Nazareth,” Dr Hungerford added.

3 charts that show being Muslim has nothing to do with how ‘British’ you feel

01/21/16

David Cameron has launched a number of measures aimed at improving integration among Muslims – in particular, Muslim women – in the UK. Polls show that around 70% of people don’t think Muslims are well integrated into British society and concern that Muslim people living in Britain do not feel British has long been part of broader discussions around extremism.

So, now seems like a good time to take a closer look at how British Muslims actually feel about their place in society and to explore the link between segregation and extremism in greater depth. Along with Professor James Nazroo, I conducted research into these issues using nationally representative data, collected in 2008/09 from almost 5,000 people with different ethnic and religious backgrounds, as a part of the Home Office Citizenship Survey. We found that these ideas about British Muslims are not backed up by evidence.

In this survey, respondents from a range of religious and ethnic backgrounds were asked about whether they felt they belong in Britain. The questions capture three different senses of belonging. Participants were asked about the extent to which they agreed with the following statement: “I personally feel a part of Britain.

It’s clear that almost everyone in the religious and ethnic groups examined feels a sense of personal belonging to Britain. And those who didn’t were as likely to be Christian as Muslim.

Most recently, Cameron’s campaign has been criticised as taking a “lazy and misguided” approach to Muslim women. Conservative peer Baroness Warsi commented that linking English proficiency with the continuation of spousal visas was “a very unusual way of empowering and emboldening women”.

This research suggests that concerns about Muslim loyalty to Britain are misplaced. It also suggests that, as a society, we should think more carefully about how we engage with our fellow Britons. A proportion of the ethnic and religious minority population in Britain does run the risk of experiencing a sense of alienation, but this is unlikely to be addressed by improving language skills. Instead, it requires a more concerted effort to reduce the processes which isolate these members of our society. Questioning the loyalty of already loyal citizens runs a direct risk of making the “Muslim problem” much worse than it actually is.

H&M Features First Hijab-Wearing Muslim Model In Campaign

One of the world’s largest fashion retailers is launching a new advertising campaign featuring – for the first time in its history – a Muslim woman wearing a hijab. Mariah Idrissi, 23, appears in the H&M advert, which is trying to encourage people to recycle clothes. She told the BBC that she believed the fashion industry was changing to cater better for women wearing the Muslim headscarf.

Idrissi who is of a Pakistani and Moroccan heritage is based in London appears in the high street brand’s video wearing a chequered hijab and sunglasses to promote its Close the Loop recycling initiative.

Speaking to Fusion about the ad campaign Idrissi said ‘It always feels like women who wear hijab are ignored when it comes to fashion,’ but she is delighted over the huge step to inclusion in fashion. Since the advert launched her Instagram following has more than doubled to 4,000 and she is getting messages from young Muslim girls saying it had helped them with their confidence.

Idrissi has also suffered from her fair share of negative comments, particularly from other Muslim women who said the advert was not modest. But she has brushed them off, saying: “People have said ‘Wearing a hijab is about being modest so how come you are posing?’ But why can you not look decent and covered? You don’t need to be naked to look good. There is no restriction on having a personality if you wear a headscarf.” She said the women making the comments about modesty were the reason British society still sees Islam as oppressive to women.

The ad celebrates models of various ethnicity, religion, body types and goes a long way to tell us there are no rules in fashion!