Muslim mayor of Paris, Texas, calls it quits — for now

Paris is about to lose its first Muslim mayor.

Dr. Arjumand Hashmi, a prominent cardiologist selected by his Paris City Council peers to be mayor in 2011, confirmed Wednesday that he won’t seek the mayor’s post next Monday.

That’s when the council is set to canvass votes from Saturday’s election and pick a new leadership team.

Hashmi, 53, will remain on the council for at least another year before his term expires next May. But with two of the four council members who were solidly in his corner losing their seats Saturday, Hashmi would’ve had to fight to keep the top post.

He said he possibly could have mustered the four votes needed to hang onto the job. Instead, he decided to use the coming year to focus on his District 7 constituents and contemplate his political future.

“I’ve had an extremely good three years,” Hashmi said in a phone interview Wednesday. “My term is coming to a completion next Monday and I’m very thrilled by the fact I’ve had a wonderful council and team to work with. And we’ve achieved some things that no other council has achieved in the last 30 years.

“We brought accountability, transparency and we have improved the health, safety and quality of life of our residents, and I’m very proud of it,” said Hashmi, the director of interventional cardiology at Paris Regional Medical Center.

Saud Anwar, Connecticut’s First Muslim Mayor

November 22, 2013

 

South Windsor physician Saud Anwar is the state’s first Muslim mayor. He sat down with Where We Live to talk about his faith, his vision for the town, and how he plans to juggle his busy schedule. Anwar is a native of Pakistan, who came to Connecticut via Illinois to study medicine at Yale.

On being the first Muslim mayor in the state:
Anwar says that although his faith is important because it shapes his values, he is focused on his new responsibilities. “The fact that I am a mayor who is of Muslim faith helps the children who are in our communities in Connecticut or beyond who at times feel they are bullied or disenfranchised…when they are hearing on radio or television about their faith,” he said. “This would hopefully allow them to recognize that the people who are trying to paint them with a broad brush do not necessarily represent true America.”

On what he’ll tackle first as mayor of South Windsor:
Saud Anwar said his first step will be to unify the town. The town is divided, he said, not only across political boundaries, but across ethnic and demographic boundaries as well. “One of the main issues that we need to recognize [is] that we are all in it together,” he said. “This is our home. This is our community. We are going to do whatever it takes to stay together, and only together we’ll be able to address all the issues that we have to.” Anwar said that his job as a physician has taught him to be organized and to work with a team, all of which he plans to use in his new position.

 

Cair.com: http://cair.com/press-center/american-muslim-news/12268-saud-anwar-connecticut-first-muslim-mayor.html

Political Involvement of Muslims Receives a Cautious Reaction

24 May 2012

 

UK Muslims are increasingly becoming involved in the political system, which bears its fruit as Muslim figures assume office. In the recent local election, Abdul Razak Osman, an Indian-origin Muslim was elected as the first Muslim Mayor of the city of Leicester.

 

The reaction to the event from outside of the Muslim community was mixed and mostly sceptical. The article by Soeren Kern reflects the concerns of those skeptical vis a vis Muslims’ successes in politics.