Youths top US mosques challenges

IslamOnline.net has posted a feature piece noting the significance of youth and young people in the changing face of US Muslims in their local Islamic centers and communities. “Islamic centers must include youth on their boards and in their decision-making process,” imam Mahdi Bray, executive director of MAS Freedom.

New generations of Muslims top a long list of tough challenges faced by mosques and Islamic centers across the country, citing a relevance for their perspective and inclusion in decision making processes. Dawud Walid, executive director of the Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR) Michigan Chapter, says reaching out to youths should be in both classical Islamic knowledge and its practical application in America. “In this endeavor, Islamic centers need to develop young leaders and encourage them to study Islam academically,” he believes.

Muslims Donate for Hungry Americans

By Abderrazak Mrabet RALEIGH, North Carolina – The Muslim American Society (MAS) has launched a nationwide campaign to encourage Muslims to donate food and money to help feed fellow hungry Americans, regardless of their faith. “It’s our way of showing the community that we care about everyone and that Allah loves everyone, Muslims and non-Muslims,” Allyson Swelam, the head of the outreach committee in MAS Raleigh chapter, told IslamOnline.net. Muslims are encouraged to donate canned food, nonperishable items as well as money to provide fresh meat. Donation boxes were made available at local mosques and Islamic schools. “All donations are going directly to low income people who live under the poverty line,” said Allyson. She asserted that the response of the Muslim community was good, especially that this is the first time to conduct such a campaign. “I think this is a good start and we already met our target as far as the cost of the meat that we pre-ordered.”