Leading Muslim calls for extremists to leave the UK

The founder of the British Muslim Forum has said hate-filled Islamic extremists should leave the country. Senior Muslim scholar Sheiykh Allama Shahid Raza Naeemi OBE was speaking at an event to bring Kirklees (West Yorkshire) communities together.

He said: “To those extremists who are using and abusing the name of Islam by making silly ill-thought out statements, my message to you is leave this country if you are not happy. If you hate pork, if you hate other non-Muslims, if you hate the police, if you hate moderate Sufi Muslims, if you hate the British Government, then feel welcome to leave this country. We do not need you here to stir up hatred. There is no place for racism and extremism in Islam.”

Muslim Martin Luthers: The Theologians Working Towards a Euro-Islam

Leading Muslim scholars are laying the theological foundations for a “Euro-Islam” which would reconcile their religion with the challenges of modernity. But just how compatible is Islam with secular Western values? The air in the conference room is stale, and the dour mood among those present is not much better. The room smells of sweat, cigarette smoke, cold coffee — and plenty of problems. That comes with the territory at a meeting of some 100 social workers who work in flashpoints like the London boroughs of Hounslow, Eastleigh and Ealing. In their districts they often have to deal with angry youth gangs, unemployment and failed integration policies. Today, on this particular Thursday, they have gathered here in the large hall of the Holborn Bars conference center to learn that multiculturalism also has positive aspects and, most importantly, that no one needs to be afraid of Muslims. Dieter Bednarz and Daniel Steinvorth

Leading Muslim Tells British Faithful: Abandon Hijab

LONDON (AFP) – A leading moderate Muslim in Britain advised women against wearing the Islamic veil for safety reasons in the aftermath of the London bombings. “A woman wearing the hijab in the present circumstances could suffer aggression from irresponsible elements. Therefore, she ought not to wear it,” said Zaki Badawi, chairman of the Council of Mosques and Imams and head of the Muslim College in London. The Egyptian-born leader made the call amid fears that Muslims could be targeted in a backlash over the July attacks. London’s Metropolitan Police said faith hate crimes were up 600 percent on the same period last year after the attacks. “In the present tense situation, with the rise of attacks on Muslims, we advise Muslim women who fear being attacked physically or verbally to remove their hijab so as not to be identified by those who are hostile to Muslims,” said Badawi. The July 7 attacks were perpetrated by four British Muslims. They blew up themselves and 52 others in three blasts on the London Underground and one on a bus. A repeat attempt by another gang of four men failed when the bombs failed to detonate fully. Badawi said the Koran justified removing the hijab, as it instructed women to dress so they could be “identified and not molested”. “The preservation of life and limb has a much higher priority than appearance, whether in dress or in speech,” he added. Badawi was denied entry to the United States with no explanation a week after the deadly attacks but accepted an unreserved apology offered later. He was due to speak in New York on the law and Islam.