Leadership in Tallahassee must stand against in-toleration

Over the past two legislative sessions, the Florida House and Senate wasted precious taxpayer dollars hearing harmful and unnecessary anti-Sharia legislation. Indeed, it came perilously close to passage in 2012 — passing the House and ultimately dying awaiting a final vote in the Senate.So no Floridian should be surprised that an anti-Sharia bill was once again filed for the 2013 session.

The real uncertainty is whether Tallahassee leadership will finally stand up to this intolerance, or again give into it and, in the process, waste valuable taxpayer dollars.The neutrally titled and worded “Application of Foreign Law” bill, which applies to family law provisions, is nothing more than camouflaged bigotry.

It is based on model language drafted by a controversial attorney, David Yerushalmi, who has a record of espousing anti-Muslim, anti-immigrant and racist views.This legislation is a classic example of the proverbial “solution in search of a problem.” Its supposed purpose is to counter the infiltration of our judicial and legal system by Sharia (Islamic) law.

But for the past two legislative sessions, proponents have failed to cite even one Florida court decision, or any other court decision, demonstrating an actual need for this legislation.  They can’t provide any examples because — as pointed out by a recent American Bar Association resolution and report opposing anti-Sharia measures — state and federal laws already prohibit courts from applying religious or foreign law in any way that would be against public policy, or constitute government advancement of or entanglement with religion.

This reckless legislation, however, imprudently goes far beyond these proven limitations.  This legislation is applicable to all religious law. So, for instance, the observant Jewish community regularly uses religious tribunals (Bet Dins) to resolve all kinds of disputes, including divorce settlements, which often are the basis for civil court divorce decrees and orders.

But this legislation would prevent a Jewish couple in Florida from voluntarily using a Bet Din to resolve their divorce settlement, and also would invalidate an out-of state divorce based on a Bet Din arbitration.  It also could negatively impact the use of Christian religious tribunals or certain applications of Canon law.

The leadership in Tallahassee needs to send a clear message that Florida values its diversity and welcomes persons of all backgrounds. They can do that by blocking this offensive bill, and unifying Floridians through legislation that finds common ground to move the state forward.

A National Unity Government for Egypt!

President Morsi has failed. The divided nation now needs real dialogue. The majority of Egyptians is against a theological state, says diplomat and political analyst Ashraf Swelam

Egypt is more divided than ever before. You don’t have to be a genius to recognize this fact. And yet, President Mohammed Morsi has not comprehended the situation. Nor has the leadership of the Muslim Brotherhood, nor have their allies from the Salafi camp. And this is despite Morsi having won the country’s first presidential election with only a slim majority.

After the election, Morsi’s most pressing task was to unite the divided country and act as the president of all Egyptians. This is what he had promised. Yet, without batting an eyelid, he did exactly the opposite. He thereby contributed to the growth of a deep-seated and earnest aversion felt by many Egyptians to the Muslim brotherhood.

And, time and again, he has bowed down before Egypt’s so-called “deep state”, the impenetrable web made up of the military, security forces, and bureaucrats. He has even taken up common cause with them, instead of taking revolutionary forces on board to help breathe new life into the severely weakened country.

 

 

Signing of Agreement between Educaislam and the Muslim Network, Red Musulmanas

12/04/2012

Educaislam, the training Centre of the Junta Islamica, has signed a cooperation agreement with the Muslim Network, Red Musulmanas this April.
Both entities have signed a collaboration agreement for the purpose of
deepening their relations initiatives and activities. As one of the main measures they will enhance all teaching innovation projects that respond to the educational needs of Muslim and young people with the aim of contributing to their empowerment and leadership and to combat Islamophobia.

Dutch-Turkish Woman Stands as Candidate for Dutch Labour Leadership

4 March 2012

 

Following the resignation of Labour Party (PvDA) leader Job Cohen, five candidates are vying for leadership of the party in the Netherlands. One of the five is Turkish-born politician Nebahat Albayrak. Albayrak moved to the Netherlands as a baby. Her successful political career includes service as a Member of Parliament for the Labour Party from 1998-2007, when she became the Netherlands’ State Secretary for Justice. (2007-2010).

Toronto’s Largest Muslim School Tournament

OnIslam – March 8, 2012

The Annual Muslim Interscholastic Tournament (MIST Toronto) is set to open on Saturday, March 10 on the York University campus for an annual Muslim interscholastic tournament. Launched in 2001 by a freshman at the University of Houston, MIST is a fun, educational, interactive program of competitions and workshops. It aims at bringing high school students together from around the country to develop leadership, communication, and other creative skills, all while gaining a deeper understanding of Islam and Muslims.

MIST Toronto was the first MIST region to be established outside of the United States back in 2008. In just four years, MIST Toronto not only became the largest MIST region, but also it became the biggest Muslim high school event in North America.

Sarah Palin: North Korean Missile Launch A Reminder To Work On ‘Energy Independence’ and Obama’s appeasement to Muslim World.

The death of North Korea tyrant Kim Jong Il has elicited a variety of responses from political figures on this hemisphere. Tonight on Follow the Money, Sarah Palin weighed in on both the death of the dictator and the missile launch shortly after in North Korea, and told host Eric Bolling she saw the danger as a reminder that America must focus on being secure, which means “energy independence” and “solvency with our economy.”

She also noted the short-range missile recently fired under the new leadership of the young and seemingly equally-unstable Kim Jong Un, describing it as “a firing shot across the bow to show the rest of the world that ‘we’re still here.’” To Palin, this was a reminder to be “wise in our foreign policy decisions,” and to take steps “for America to be secure, and that comes back to energy independence, that comes back to solvency with our economy… to make sure that we’re not reliant on other countries.” She concluded that America must make sure to continue “sweeping our own porch.”

These last comments concerned Bolling in light of the leadership of President Obama, “who has been apologetic towards the Muslim world,” particularly with Iran. “If [Kim Jong Un] is playing war games the first day in office,” Bolling argued, that was not a good sign, and “maybe it’s time to get a tougher president.” Palin replied in the affirmative, making the argument that the President had said as a candidate that he was open to talks with rogue nations, and that should have been a sign then that his policies would be what they are.

Dutch Turkish Community Concerned About Youth

In a letter to the Dutch newspaper Volkskrant this week, a group of Dutch Turkish professionals expressed concern regarding the position of youth in the community. According to the letter, a growing number of young Dutch Turks feel they are “second class citizens and will remain so”, an exclusion which has perpetuated feelings of apathy and encouraged a turn to crime and radical Islam among the contingent. The open letter drafted by a group of teachers, researchers and civil servants urges the government to ensure that the youth get the education and leadership they need.

Radio Netherlands Worldwide covers the issue with a commentary indicating that the disintegration of a close knit Turkish community safety net in the Netherlands results from an ageing first generation immigrant population and lack of funding and subsidies to community organizations, and claims that those who are well educated often “return” to Turkey, thus “turning their backs” on upcoming generations of Dutch Turkish youth in need of role models.

Report published on Muslim faith leadership and imam training

8 October 2010
The Department for Communities and Local Government has published a report dealing with the training of imams in the UK. As shown throughout the report, the Muslim Faith Leadership Training Review involved a wide range of activities and a wide range of individuals and institutions. Also, it necessarily involved attention to many different traditions and points of view, and therefore much dialogue and deliberation. The purpose of this report is to help promote further such dialogue and deliberation, not only in Muslim communities and organisations but also throughout wider society.

[Read Report]

Number of Muslims Disputed

Official figures, as well as those of the Islamic Religious Community in Austria (IGGiÖ), place the number of Muslims in Austria at 330 000. This number is disputed by those who are not members of the IGGiÖ, such as the liberal Turkish Alevis. The Alevis do not consider themselves to be represented by the current leadership (most of whom being of Arab origin), and consequently are fighting for state recognition of their religious community.

“Muslims in Britain: An Introduction” by Sophie Gilliat-Ray (Cardiff University) Cambridge University Press, June 2010

Archaeological evidence shows there was contact between Muslims and the British Isles from the 8th century. Beginning with these historical roots, Sophie Gilliat-Ray traces the major points of encounter between Muslims and the British in subsequent centuries, and explores Muslim migration to Britain in recent times. Drawing upon sociology, anthropology, politics, and geography, this comprehensive survey provides an informed understanding of the daily lives of British Muslims. It portrays the dynamic of institutions such as families, mosques and religious leadership, and analyses their social and political significance in today’s Britain. Through the study of the historical origins of major Islamic reform movements, it draws attention to the religious diversity within different Muslim communities, and sheds fresh light on contemporary issues such as the nature of religious authority and representation. It also considers British Muslim civic engagement and cultural life, particularly the work of journalists, artists, sports personalities, and business entrepreneurs.

Contents
Acknowledgements; Preface; Part I. Historical and Religious Roots: 1. The roots of Islam in Britain; 2. The development of Muslim communities; 3. Middle Eastern religious reform movements; 4. South Asian religious reform movements; Part II. Contemporary Dynamics: 5. Profiling British Muslim communities; 6. Religious nurture and education; 7. Religious leadership; 8. Mosques; 9. Gender, religious identity and youth; 10. Engagement and enterprise; Epilogue; Appendix: Source notes for researchers; List of references; Glossary; Index.