American Jihadist Is Believed to Have Been Killed by His Former Allies in Somalia

NAIROBI, Kenya — A young man from Alabama who traveled to Somalia and became an infamous Islamist militant, commanding guerrilla forces and earning a $5 million American bounty on his head, was believed to have been killed by his former extremist allies on Thursday, according to news reports and Islamist Web sites.

The jihadist, Omar Hammami, known for his rap-infused propaganda videos for the Shabab, a brutal Islamist group in Somalia, was reported killed in an ambush on Thursday morning. If true, his death would bring to a close one of the more unusual chapters in more than two decades of fighting in the Horn of Africa.

 

But Mr. Hammami, also known by the nom de guerre Abu Mansoor Al-Amriki, “the American,” has been declared dead before, only to resurface alive.

There is little question that Mr. Hammami has been on the run from his former comrades. His recent troubles brought to the surface rifts within militant circles in Somalia, particularly between foreign fighters and Somalis. In a Twitter message in April, Mr. Hammami said the group’s leader had “gone mad” and was “starting a civil war.”

J. M. Berger, the editor of the Web site Intelwire.com and author of the book “Jihad Joe: Americans Who Go to War in the Name of Islam,” said that it appeared this time that Mr. Hammami had indeed been killed.

Mr. Berger, who has been monitoring hundreds of Shabab-related social media accounts for over a year, cited a death notice on a Jihadi Web site that had supported the American militant and posted interviews with him in the past.

 

The son of a Southern Baptist mother and a Syrian Muslim father, Mr. Hammami was raised in Daphne, Ala., where he was a gifted student and high school class president. He later embraced the ultraconservative form of Islam known as Salafism before ultimately moving to Somalia in 2006 to fight for the Shabab.

 

The charismatic American fighter was a propaganda coup for the Somali militants. He worked on recruitment and handled financial affairs for the group. But Mr. Hammami was more than just a YouTube sensation and back-office militant. He is believed to have personally commanded forces in the field and organized guerrilla attacks.

 

He did not consider his native land off limits. “It’s quite obvious that I believe America is a target,” he wrote in an e-mail to The New York Times in 2010.

 

Growing up in Daphne, a city of 23,000 on Mobile Bay, Mr. Hammami loved Kurt Cobain and Nintendo and dabbled in drugs. But he also attended Bible camp. His decision to join a violent group responsible for beheadings and forced amputations was especially bewildering to family and friends.

 

German Police Arrest Two in Connection With Islamist Web Site

German federal police arrested two men Tuesday, Nov. 25, for operating a radical Islamist website and they are likely to face charges of supporting terrorism, prosecutors said. The German-language website, GIMF, which stands for Global Islamic Media Front, contained videos from al-Qaeda, Mesopotamian al-Qaeda and the radical group Ansar al-Islam. It also contained two videos made in Germany demanding the withdrawal of German and Austrian troops from Afghanistan, the prosecutor-general’s office in Karlsruhe said. The suspects, aged 23 and 26, were both German nationals. A third German, 19, who was already in custody on another matter was also suspected of involvement in running the site. Police arrested the two men men Tuesday in the German towns of Biberach and Schlangen on warrants issued last week. A further five persons were under suspicion after 12 premises were searched during the day. Explaining why managing a Web site was considered to be terrorism, the prosecutors said it spread propaganda.

Full-text article continues here. (Some news sites may require registration)

Al Qaeda gives Austria ultimatum on hostages’ release

Al Qaeda’s North African wing said on Thursday it had given Austria three days to secure the release of some of its members held in Algeria and Tunisia in return for two Austrian hostages it was holding. The group said in a statement posted on an Islamist Web site that it had informed the Austrian government of the ultimatum which will start at midnight on Thursday, without giving a time zone. “Austria would be responsible for the lives of the two hostages should the deadline come and our demands are not met,” it said, adding that the demands and a list of the names of the prisoners were sent to Vienna through unidentified mediators. The group posted pictures of the man and woman, whom it says it seized on February 22, surrounded by armed militants in a desert area. The face of the woman who wore a blue head scarf was digitally blurred, apparently to abide with an austere interpretation of Islam which says women should cover their faces. Inal Ersan and by Mark Heinrich in Vienna