Christian Preacher in London may hold vital information on ISIS

A Christian preacher in London may hold vital information about a man suspected by the security services of being an accomplice of Jihadi John, the Islamic State murderer.

Daniel Downer, who is not accused of any wrongdoing, was sent a message by Nero Saraiva, who travelled to Syria two years ago. Mr Downer, from Chingford, east London, was asked to provide photographs of Saraiva’s young son, who is thought to live in the capital with Saraiva’s former partner.

It is believed the security services are keen to speak to everyone with knowledge of Saraiva’s movements after it emerged that he appeared to have advance knowledge of an ISIL beheading video.

Islamic State launches online magazine in French

15 pages of jihadist propaganda in color and in French can now be found on the Internet. The new magazine entitled Dar al-Islam has been available online since December 22. Previously the other major foreign language magazine was “Daqib,” a publication in English. (Photo: Twitter/Figaro)
15 pages of jihadist propaganda in color and in French can now be found on the Internet. The new magazine entitled Dar al-Islam has been available online since December 22. Previously the other major foreign language magazine was “Daqib,” a publication in English. (Photo: Twitter/Le Figaro)

15 pages of jihadist propaganda in color and in French can now be found on the Internet. The new magazine entitled Dar al-Islam has been available online since December 22. Previously the other major foreign language magazine was “Daqib,” a publication in English. The two magazines are released by the media communications branch of ISIL, Al-Hayat, which was founded in May 2014. The communication arm of ISIL often uses Twitter as its main platform. A recent Twitter post reads:

#Al-Hayat presents the first edition of the magazine “Dar Al-Islam”
— fr-alhayat (@fralhayat) 22 Décembre 2014

The magazine’s first edition is entitled “The Islamic state extends its territory.” In the introduction, the authors celebrate being “witnesses to a new era,” that of the restoration of the caliphate, which would allow Muslims to live according to Islamic law.
The magazine’s title translates to “abode of Islam.” One of its article’s reads: “It’s why the magazine is named Dar al-Islam, to remember the immense blessing it is to live under Allah’s law, among believers.”

The magazine is filled with grammatical errors, passages from the Qur’an and words in Arabic, and seeks to convince French Muslims to pledge allegiance to the caliphate. The authors denounce the “idolatrous”: “those who change the law of Allah,” and “the crusaders who love the cross and call a child the Lord of heaven.”

For Mathieu Slama, specialist in “crisis communication,” the magazine serves two purposes. The first is as a recruitment method. The last page of the magazine shows a French passport being burned. The second purpose is to show ISIL’s a willingness to institutionalize. The magazine uses Western journalistic methods: catchy titles, photos and summaries, shows the West that ISIL is becoming a legitimate institution.

Manuel Valls said he could not definitively ban this type of propaganda. The Cazeneuve law of November 2014 hardened provisions that punish the glorification of terrorism, especially on the Internet. However the European Commission must meet to discuss if the magazine can be banned, and the decision would not take effect until late February or early March 2015.

UK Women wanting to become ‘jihadi brides.’

British-Somali sisters, Salma and Zahra Halane, who once aspired to be doctors are now in Syria training to be fighters with ISIS. They are part of a growing number of young women leaving Britain to join the terror group in Syria and Iraq.
British-Somali sisters, Salma and Zahra Halane, who once aspired to be doctors are now in Syria training to be fighters with ISIS. They are part of a growing number of young women leaving Britain to join the terror group in Syria and Iraq.

Hundreds of British women are reportedly desperate to go to Syria to join Islamic State (Isis) and become jihadi brides. At least 11 women have been linked to front line fighters, according to academic experts.

Melanie Smith from King’s College International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation, is in contact with 53 girls who have fled to Syria or attempted to get there. “Hundreds. I come across girls every day who say, ‘I’m so desperate to go over there but it’s just so hard for me'”, she said. “The proportion of girls who eventually make the transition from wanting to go to physically going is tiny. But there are so many people that want to go. And it’s fairly overwhelming. There’s a lot of that kind of mentality. It’s laziness, really. And they’re bored with their life here. They say they have more freedom in IS.”

For example, twins Salma and Zahra Halane, 16, followed their brother from Manchester to Syria and have also reportedly married IS fighters. Between them the twins have 28 GCSEs and were training as doctors. Their social media posts have shown images of machine guns next to the Qur’an.

Two sets of British brothers travelled to Syria to fight with ISIS

Four members of the same family are suspected of having flown to Syria to fightalongside the self-proclaimed Islamic State. Two brothers aged 17 and 20, from
Camden in north London, are believed to have travelled with their cousins via Milan to Istanbul before they all crossed the border into Syria.

Their cousins, also brothers and are from Wednesbury in the Midlands, have been identified as Mejanul Islam, 22, and Kamran Islam, 19, and their parents told the Sunday Times that the young men had told them that they were going to London to visit their extended family.

The mother of the siblings said they claimed to have gone on holiday to Thailand and the family had no idea that they had plans to actually travel to Turkey to potentially cross the border into Syria. Community leader Dr Jamal Rifi, in western Sydney, said the family had no inkling that the boys were at risk of joining Isis.

Nadine Morano, member of the UMP, confuses Islamic State with the Islamic Jihad Movement in Palestine

Nadine Morano is opposed to France’s recognition of the Palestinian state, as proposed by socialist deputies in the National Assembly. On November 28 she

French politician Nadine Morano confuses Islamic Jihad and Islamic State.
French politician Nadine Morano confuses Islamic Jihad and Islamic State.

expressed her sentiments about the proposal. She said, “who decapitates westerners? Those that are members of the Islamic jihad, Hamas’s partners. It’s the Jews that are beheading people today? It’s the Jews that decapitated Hervé Gourdel?” Her statement clearly confuses the Islamic State and the Islamic Jihad Movement in Palestine (JIP).

The Islamic State wants to establish a caliphate in its occupied territory. The JIP aims to eradicate Israel in order to establish a Palestinian state on the Israel’s current territory. Those who decapitated Hervé Gourdel “were members of the Islamic State.” Its members regularly threaten Western countries that are aiding Iraq’s government in overthrowing the Islamic State. ISIL has executed five hostages in the last three months. Gourdel was killed in September in Algeria by the group Djound Al-Khalifa (Soldiers of the Caliphate,) a group affiliated with ISIL.

In Germany, dealing with potential Jihad fighters

After a conference the German Interior Minister, Thomas de Maizière, announced that radical Islamists should be hindered to travel to war zones in order to join Jihad. This should be achieved by substituting the original ID card with a document which does not allow for exit. Indirectly, the ministry is also addressing the issue of Jihad fighters returning from Iraq/Syria and becoming a potential threat for the German society in general. Rolf Jäger, chairperson of the Interior Minister’s Conference, emphasized on the double strategy of repression and prevention needed in order to stop radicalization. In relation to this Heiko Maaß, Federal Minister of Justice, suggested to tighten law regulations concerning two significant points: Firstly, people should be held accountable when funding terrorism and secondly, people should be held accountable for already leaving Germany in the attempt to pursue an act of violence as well as receive any training in this regard (there is no legal punishment for both within the given legal framework). Members of the Christian Democratic Union criticized this proposal as one not going far enough and thereby inadequate. The Union argued that the proposal should also include the mere promotion of a terrorist organization such as ISIS/ISIL. Meanwhile, the interior ministry of Bavaria has deported the Salafist Erhan A. to Turkey, after his endorsement of ISIS/ISIL, its ideological framework as well as the beheadings.

Anger over the U.A.E. list of terror organisations

The inclusion by the United Arab Emirates of some of the most respected Islamic organizations established within Nordic states and the UK on a list of groups – including al-Qaeda and the ISIL- suspected of having links to terrorism has triggered a wave of protest.

In the UK, the Muslim Association of Britain expressed its “total and utter condemnation” at the move. The President of the organization, Omer el-Hamdoon, said from its north London headquarters: “We openly question the basis under which this list has been compiled and we call on the UAE to explain why this questionable and objectionable decision has been taken. The action places the lives of ordinary Muslim people in danger as they may be targeted and treated as terrorists or become the victims of hate crimes.”

Issued by President His Highness Shaikh Khalifa Bin Zayed Al Nahyan, the list included major terror groups such as al-Qaeda as well as the Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt, as well as regional and local affiliates and smaller regional groups.

Two British citizens killed fighting for the Islamic State

Two British citizens are understood to have been killed fighting for Islamic State in Syria. Abu Abdullah al Habashi, 21, and Abu Dharda, 20, both from London, are reported to have died in the Syrian border town of Kobani.

Al Habashi is believed to have made comments supporting Isis on social media and appeared in at least two propaganda videos posted online by the extremist group. He grew up in north London in a British-Eritrean family, and converted to Islam when he was 16. His family tried to convince him to return to Britain but he had said he was happy in the Middle East and there was no going back. Dharda, who is from a British-Somali background and grew up in west London, is understood to have travelled to Syria in December 2013 via Turkey.

About 27 Britons are understood to have lost their lives after joining the jihadists.

Three Jihadists Call on French Muslims to Support ISIL

A recent online video released by ISIL (Daech) shows three mujahideen addressing French Muslims and calling on them to join the fight in Syria or to commit attacks on French soil.

The Public Prosecutor’s department has opened an investigation on the basis of “criminal association in connection with a criminal enterprise,” “possession of a weapon in connection with a terrorist enterprise” and “incitement of terrorist acts using communication services.” The latter qualification has been created by the new antiterrorism law which was established November 13.

The seven-minute video was posted on jihadi Internet forums and drew the attention of the center for surveillance of radical Islamist websites. It appeared three days after the group posted the online video of Peter Kassig’s murder, in which two Frenchmen are present. They have since been identified as Maxime Hauchard and Mickael Dos Santos.

The three men, who call themselves Abu Osama al-Faranci, Abu Maryam al-Faranci and Abu Salman al-Faranci, are openly filmed and are seen burning their French passports.

UOIF dismayed to be classified as “terrorist” organization by the United Arab Emirates

The Union of Islamic Organizations in France (UOIF), which has ties to the Muslim Brotherhood, said it discovered with “shock and anger” its presence on a list of “terrorist organizations” established by the United Arab Emirates.

 

The list was published in mid-November by the UAE, which is part of an international anti-jihadist coalition led by the United States. It names 83 groups, many of which are based in Syria.

Al-Qaeda, ISIL, the Muslim Brotherhood and its various branches are also on the list. “It’s with shock and horror that the UOIF has discovered that it is part of a list of organizations classified as terrorist organizations by the political authorities in the United Arab Emirates,” said the group in a statement published on its website.

“Several other Western Muslim organizations are also unfairly listed,” said the Council of American-Islamic Relations (CAIR). These include The International Islamic Relief Organization and the Federation of Islamic Organizations in Europe (FOIE), both of which have ties to the Muslim Brotherhood. “This qualification, as insulting as it is ridiculous, affects not only French Muslims and their representatives, but also our country and its international image,” the UOIF stated. The group “reserves the right to take action to demand reparations.”

The UOIF boasts 250 member associations and mosque leaders and is one of the principal organizations to shape the “French-Muslim landscape,” along with the Great Mosque of Paris, the RMF, the UMF and the CCMTF. Although it no longer participates in events held by the French Council of the Muslim Faith, the UOIF hosts an annual event billed as the largest gathering of Muslims in the West, with more than 150,000 attendees.

In the past weeks the group has condemned ISIL’s actions and signed a “call to French Muslims” while lambasting the “deportation of Iraqi Christians.” Despite their public statements condemning terrorism, Front National leader Marine Le Pen has “reiterated her request for the UOIF’s dissolution,” which she previously requested in 2012, citing “the dangerousness of an organization that consistently defies the Republic and encourages radicalization.”