Contemporary Muslim Consumer Cultures – an Emerging Field of Study

Consumer culture in the Muslim world, or Muslims as a specific target group who participate actively in a consumer market, are rather new realms for academic researchers. For many Muslims, consumption plays an increasing role in identity formation. Their growing cultural and religious self-awareness transforms markets, advertising strategies and consumer behavior. Muslim consumer culture is closely interrelated to globalization and is, therefore, of relevance to various areas of economic, sociological, anthropological, psychological and religious scholarship. However, so far scholarly research on this subject has been very limited. And though studies very often acknowledge or include the interdisciplinary character of Muslim consumer culture, there is still a need for a comprehensive analysis of its many aspects.

The conference aims at creating a network of international scholars and young researchers with various approaches to the subject, and it also aims at initiating exchange and cooperation between them to develop the basic grounds for this emerging field of study. It will include two invited keynote speakers, two panel discussions led by experts, and a number of workshops during which all participants will have the opportunity to present and discuss their research projects. There will be no more than 20 speakers to allow useful discussion. We especially encourage applications from the Middle East, Africa and Asia.

Submissions of abstracts and papers on the following broad themes are encouraged:

  • Issues of advertising products for a Muslim target group 
  
  • Gender-specific consumption behavior in a Muslim context 

  • “Western” versus “Islamic” brands 
  
  • The question whether there is such a thing as an Islamic consumer, and how it can be defined 
 Products geared toward a religious public (e.g. Islamic fashion) 
  
  • Recent developments in the consumer landscape of Muslim societies 
  
  • Religious and moral factors affecting individual patterns of consumption or legislation, e.g. questions of ritual purity.

All papers that are submitted by the start of the conference and successfully complete a peer-review process will be published in a concerence volume.

Please submit your application, including an abstract of about 150-200 words and a short c.v., by May 15, 2008, preferrably by e-mail. Registration fee is 50 €; lodging, breakfast and lunch meals will be provided. We offer a reimbursement of travel costs for participants from the Middle East, Africa, Asia, Turkey, the Americas and the countries of the former Soviet Union if their institution is not able to cover them.

Contact: Freie Universität Berlin, Institut für Islamwissenschaft, Dr. Johanna Pink, Altensteinstr. 40, 14195 Berlin, Germany, phone: +49 (0) 30-838-51437, fax: +49 (0) 30-838-52830, e-mail: jpink@zedat.fu-berlin.de.

Muslim Diversities volumes II and III: ’Circumstances and Change’ and ’Conformity and Conflict’

The “Muslim Diversities” series offers a comprehensive exploration of the diversities that constitute the contemporary Islamic and Muslim social, political, economic and theological landscapes around the world. It challenges and deconstructs the assumption of homogeneity that pervades contemporary understandings of what constitutes today’s “Islam” and “Muslims”. Each of its three volumes seek to present a wide range of critically engaged and innovatively informed perspectives.

Innovative and interdisciplinary chapters for volumes II and III are now being invited. Focusing upon a specific community (which can be understood in terms of a community, organisation, group or other entity), both established academics and postgraduates as well as practitioners from a variety of backgrounds are encouraged to submit an abstract of no more than 500 words.

The deadline for submission of abstracts is November 30th 2007.

Muslim diversities: communities and contexts

“Muslim diversities: communities and contexts” seeks to bring together a collection of academic works that extends and informs knowledge and understanding about the diversity of communities and groups that constitute the contemporary Islamic and Muslim social, political, economic and theological landscapes in the UK, Europe and beyond.

To do this, chapters are required that focus upon a specific community (understood in terms of a community, organisation or group) that is then considered within a very specific contemporary context. It is vitally important that a specific context is therefore identified and established from the outset, as it is this that will provide the necessary framework from within which the necessary critical engagement of that community will be undertaken.

In being interdisciplinary and innovative in your approach, you may wish to consider some of the following communities (a list that is indicative rather than exhaustive):

  • Long established ethnic communities, e.g Turkish, Pakistanis
  •   Newly established communities, e.g. Eastern Europeans, Somalis
  •   Theological groups and movements, e.g. Shi’a (broad), Tablighi Jamaat (more specific)
  •   Political or politicised groups, e.g. Hizb ut-Tahrir, Stop the War (Muslim contingent)
  •   New and emergent communities, e.g. the Muslim Boys, converts/reverts
  •   Splinter and/or non-mainstream communities, e.g. Nation of Islam, Ismailies
  • In approaching these communities, you might wish to consider some of the following themes as a means of contextualisation:

  •   Political issues, e.g. integration, assimilation, belonging
  •   The media, e.g. how the community use the media, how the media represent the respective community
  •   Security, terrorism and associated legislation, e.g. responses both to and by Muslims organisations following major events such as 9/11, 7/7 and so on
  •   Theological differences, e.g. from orthodox forms of Islam, how these impact upon intra-community relationships and understandings
  •   Inter-faith perspectives and relationships
  •   Cultural aspects, e.g. music, art, literature, film
  •   The influence and effect of geography, e.g. from the simplest understanding of a given geographical location through to the perspective of minority status and all that this entails
  • Both established academics as well as postgraduates from across a variety of disciplines are encouraged in the first instance to submit an abstract of no more than 500 words that clearly sets out both the community concerned and the context within which the proposed chapter will undertake its exploration. Accompanying your abstract should be a short biography, full contact details and any academic affiliation. Submissions from suitably qualified practitioners outside the traditional academic environment will also be considered where appropriate.

    The deadline for submission of abstracts is 31 May 2007. For those whose abstracts are successful, you will be required to submit a first draft of your chapter by 1 September 2007.

    To submit abstracts or to request further information, please contact Chris Allen at: info@chris-allen.co.uk / christopherallen@blueyonder.co.uk