The Muslim vote

February 26, 2014

 

The polling firm OpinionWay conducted a poll for the French newspaper Le Figaro and surveyed 10,000 French voters.

According to its findings 93% of French Muslims voted for François Hollande while only 7% voted for the incumbent, Nicolas Sarkozy. An estimated 2 million Muslims participated in the 2012 election and approximately 1.7 million Muslims voted for Hollande rather than Sarkozy. Hollande defeated Sarkozy by 1.1 million votes, which suggests that Muslims provided critical votes that led to Hollande’s victory. However, it should be noted that voting abstention among the Muslim population is greater than within the average population.

The Muslim vote is believed to be a social vote rather than a religious vote and is very traditional concerning social matters such as family. During Hollande’s 2012 presidential campaign he offered amnesty to 400,000 undocumented immigrants from North African countries, many of who are Muslim. Hollande additionally vowed to extend municipal voting rights to residents without French citizenship by the year 2014. These promises prompted Muslims to support the Socialist party because it favors their integration.

Source: http://opinionlab.opinion-way.com/dokumenty/Sondage_jour_de_vote_T2_SOCIOLOGIE_DU_VOTE_2_1.pdf

 

IFOP (Département Opinion et Stratégies d’Enterprise) tracked the evolution of the Muslim vote using data from surveys collected during the 2002, 2007 and 2012 elections to accumulate a sample of 14, 200 voters.

In the first round of the 2012 elections 57% of Muslims voted for Hollande while 7% voted for Sarkozy. According to IFOP in the second round of voting 86% of the Muslim vote went to Hollande while 14% went to Sarkozy.

There is a similar pattern in the 2007 election, which shows that Muslims overwhelmingly supported Royal with 58%, Bayrou with 15% and the Far-left with 10% of the total possible votes.

The 2002 elections display the same trend with 49% voting for the Socialist Party and 19% for the Far-left.

Source: http://www.ifop.fr/media/pressdocument/482-1-document_file.pdf

 

A comprehensive survey entitled “Français comme les autres” published in 2008 polled French of North African and African descent.

Among those who identified as Muslim, 64% declared they voted for the Left in the 2005 election. However after posing the same question to those who identified as nonreligious the results were roughly identical, with 67% voting for the Left. The publication suggests that ethnic origin, the migration process and discrimination within France have created a cultural identity among the population which was the primary factor that influenced the vote.

Source: http://www.fasopo.org/reasopo/n7/societespolitiquescomparees7_livre.pdf

New IFOP survey suggests image of Islam in France is deteriorating

News Agencies – October 29, 2012

 

According to a study conducted by IFOP (Public Opinion Institute) for Le Figaro the image of Islam is rapidly deteriorating in France. It shows that the rise of ethnic separatist communities among some Muslims in France is strengthening the public rejection.

 

“Our study shows an evolution that is moving in the direction of a greater hardening of the French toward this religion and a reenforced negative perception of Islam,” explains Jérôme Fourquet, a director of IFOP. “Even if a significant proportion of the French, 40%, still say they are indifferent to the presence of Islam in France.”

 

If 43% of those questioned consider Islam to be a “threat”, this hardening is tied to a greatly increased “visibility” of Islam in public places and in the media. “For several years, there has not been a week without Islam being at the heart of current events, be they societal issues, the veil, halal food, or dramatic geopolitical events or attacks.” Hence another impression: 60% believe that this religion now has “too much importance”. Just two years ago it was 55%. And those who claim to be indifferent to this question go from 41% to 35%.

No longer a temporary problem

Increasing restrictiveness becomes clearer when questions on the Islamic veil or the building of mosques are asked. In 1989, 33% of those questioned were favorable to the construction of mosques. Today it is only 18%. As for the veil in the street, those opposed went from 31% to 63%. And those indifferent have virtually dissolved from half to only 28%. And as for the veil in schools, the red light goes on since, for the same period, those opposed increase from 75% to 89%.

IFOP REPORT: The perception of Europeans on Islam

Over the past several years polemical and controversial issues related to Islam have emerged in European societies. Amidst a number of highly mediatized fundamentalist attacks, tensions have focused in recent years on debates about the wearing of headscarves, mosques being vandalized, and the integration and naturalization of immigrant populations, all of which are also mobilized by extreme right political parties.

Approximately 12-13 million of Europe’s 377 million inhabitants are Muslim (4% of the population), and most live in large cities. France has the largest population, followed by Germany, the United Kingdom and the Netherlands. These four countries have very different models with which to frame the aforementioned debates. This study examining the perceptions of Europeans in these countries on Islam had five principal findings:

That concern with Islam is present but secondary
That Muslim populations are perceived to have largely failed to integrate
That the visibility of Islam is a principal issue
That there is a general rejection of political Islam but an acceptance of private beliefs
That there are important generational differences in how Muslims integrate

Poll suggests that Muslims in France are increasingly devout

News Agencies – August 1, 2011

 

French newspaper La Croix has released survey data that suggests that there are more practicing Muslims in France than 20 years ago. An IFOP poll shows that 71% France’s Muslims intend to fast for the entire month of Ramadan. The survey suggests that the intention to participate in Ramadan has increased strongly, rising by 10 points since 1989, the date of the first French survey. Fasting is especially prevalent among the 18-24 age group, which also scores highly for visits to places of worship. The picture of the French Muslim population that emerges from the survey is of a “young” (62% are aged under 35) and traditionally left-leaning community. According to the deputy director of the polling agency Ifop, this political bias has been boosted by the recent government sponsored debate on French identity, which alienated many Muslims.

IFOP poll suggests that fewer than half of French Muslims are practicing

A new IFOP study released in France suggests that fewer than half (41%) of the French Muslim population consider themselves to be practicing and believing Muslims. 34% claimed to be believers while 22% said they were of Muslim-origin and 3% with no religion.

The study was conducted with a same of 547 people of Muslim origin aged 18 years or more.

IFOP poll suggests French Muslims torn between traditional and modern relationships

According to a recently released IFOP poll, French Muslims are torn between tradition and modernity when it comes to relationships and marriage. Done for an online dating service, the poll found huge opposition to both polygamy and arranged marriages.

The poll suggests that the group’s value system remains “impregnated” with a moral code which views sex as legitimate only within a marriage and which strongly influences marriage partner choices. The poll found that 84% opposed the legalization of polygamy in France, while 83% reject the notion that parents should choose spouses for their children. Roughly three out of four (73%) are against sex outside marriage, while 53% said they were unwilling to marry a non-Muslim.

The telephone poll involved 503 respondents interviewed Nov. 23-24, 2010. The poll’s margin of error is between 1.3 and 4.4 percentage points, according to Ifop.

IFOP poll suggests French Muslims torn between traditional and modern relationships

According to a recently released IFOP poll, French Muslims are torn between tradition and modernity when it comes to relationships and marriage. Done for an online dating service, the poll found huge opposition to both polygamy and arranged marriages.

The poll suggests that the group’s value system remains “impregnated” with a moral code which views sex as legitimate only within a marriage and which strongly influences marriage partner choices. The poll found that 84% opposed the legalization of polygamy in France, while 83% reject the notion that parents should choose spouses for their children. Roughly three out of four (73%) are against sex outside marriage, while 53% said they were unwilling to marry a non-Muslim.

The telephone poll involved 503 respondents interviewed Nov. 23-24, 2010. The poll’s margin of error is between 1.3 and 4.4 percentage points, according to Ifop.

Most Muslim Voters in France Lean to the Left

In this short summary of a recent study by the IFOP (Institut Français d’Opinion Publique or the French Institute of Public Opinion) published in La Croix on September 1st, based on a study of 3280 French Muslims between 2003-2008, 51% vote for the PS (Socialist Party). 26.8% of the rest of the French population typically vote for the PS. Including those with sympathies to the extreme left and the ecologist party, more than 73% of those Muslims polled were leftist voters.

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Larger 2004 study done by the IFOP on political orientation and Muslims in France available here.

France’s Muslims becoming more religious

France’s Muslim minority, the largest in Europe, is becoming more observant, a new survey by the polling group IFOP said. Religiosity indicators such as following daily prayers, visiting mosques, and fasting Ramadan seemed to be increasing in Muslims partaking in the tenants. The rise appears to reflect a reaction to the discrimination felt by Muslims in France, as new mosques are being built around the country. An alternatively proposed reasoning is that it is easier to practice Islam in France, thanks to the building of many new mosques.

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View PDF of poll View PDF of poll (Courtesy of IFOP)

France’s Muslims becoming more religious

France’s Muslim minority, the largest in Europe, is becoming more observant, a new survey by the polling group IFOP said. Religiosity indicators such as following daily prayers, visiting mosques, and fasting Ramadan seemed to be increasing in Muslims partaking in the tenants. The rise appears to reflect a reaction to the discrimination felt by Muslims in France, as new mosques are being built around the country. An alternatively proposed reasoning is that it is easier to practice Islam in France, thanks to the building of many new mosques.