Muslims targeted in U.S. terrorism cases, report says

U.S. government tactics in pursuing domestic terrorism cases target and entrap Muslim community members and fail to enhance public safety, according to a report released Wednesday by a human rights center at New York University’s law school.

The government’s use of surveillance, paid informants and invented terrorism plots prompts human rights concerns, according to the report by NYU’s Center for Human Rights and Global Justice. The authors examined three high-profile cases in New York and New Jersey that they said raised questions about the role of the FBI and New York Police Department in creating the perception of a homegrown terrorism threat.
The report focused on specific cases, but similar allegations have been made in other domestic terrorism cases, in what the researchers said was “illustrative of larger patterns of law enforcement activities targeting Muslim communities.”

Only three women in Denmark wear burqa

Only a small number of Muslim women in Denmark wear the burqa, a new study has found, as the government considers possible restrictions on Islamic dress in public places.

While it is estimated that only three women wear burqa between 150 to 200 women use the niqab. Some 60 to 80 of these women are Danish converts to Islam, according to a survey that was conducted for a special commission looking into the contentious issue.

In August 2009 the Conservative People’s Party suggested a ban against wearing the burqa. The idea was eventually dropped because of constitutional and human rights concerns.

The issue now before the government is not an outright ban but whether there should be restrictions in some public circumstances.

Human rights concerns kept MI5 from passing on information about Abdulmutallab

MI5 failed to alert US intelligence about the extremist links of the Detroit plane bomber because of concerns about breaching his human rights and privacy. The spy agency withheld its files on Umar Farouk Abdulmutallab from Washington until after the near-catastrophic Christmas Day attack because of guidance from its legal department.

Asked why the information had not been passed to the US, a Home Office official said the security service did not pass information to its allies about the thousands of Britons who were merely suspected of having radical Islamic views. It did so only after it classified individuals as progressing into the much smaller category of “violent extremists”, a term used by MI5 to define potential or actual terrorists.