Activists Simmer Over Alleged Terror Ties to Campbell’s Soup

From the people who helped bring you the “Ground Zero Mosque” controversy come new allegations of Muslim “infiltration” linked to an organization hired to certify Campbell’s soup.

Conservative blogger Pamela Geller, who helped build opposition to a proposed Islamic center near the site of the 9/11 attacks, has begun a grassroots protest against the Campbell Soup Company over the group that it uses to label Halal certain varieties of soup for sale in Canada

Geller says she doesn’t oppose the company’s decision to label soups that conform to Islamic dietary rules, but says the company has employed a Muslim organization with terrorist ties to oversee the certification.

“I have no problem with labeling things Halal,” Geller, who founded “Stop Islamization of America”, told ABCNews.com. “The problem is that they went to [the Islamic Society of North America] for their designation, a named a co-conspirators in the Holy Land Foundation trial.”

ISNA was named an “unindicted co-conspirator” in a 2007 federal terror trial brought against the Holy Land Foundation, a Muslim charity located in Texas, which was convicted of funneling more than $12 million to Palestinian terror group Hamas.

In a statement, ISNA acknowledged being named a co-conspirator in the 2007 trial, but added, “the government admitted that its labeling of ISNA many years ago was nothing more than a legal tactic. Indeed, ISNA now has a very positive working relationship with the federal government.”

US Muslim charity leaders get 65 years in jail for Hamas support

Two former leaders of the Texas-based Holy Land foundation were sentenced to 65 years in jail for supporting Palestinian militants. Jurors returned guilty verdicts on 108 charges of providing material support to terrorists, money laundering, and tax fraud. “These sentences should serve as a strong warning to anyone who knowingly provides financial support to terrorists under the guise of humanitarian relief,” said David Kris, assistant US attorney general for national security. Holy Land CEO Shukri Abu Baker and chairman and co-founder Ghassan Elashi, were both sentenced to 65 years in jail. Holy Land cofounder Mohammad El-Mezain, and Abdulrahman Odeh, the charity’s New Jersey representative, both received lesser sentences of 15 years. The Justice Department vowed in October 2007 to retry the five Holy Land leaders after jurors could not agree on verdicts on nearly 200 charges, and a new jury was seated in mid-September. Holy Land was one of several Muslim organizations the Bush administration shut down in the wake of the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks for allegedly raising money for Islamic extremists overseas. Muslim charities that remained open suffered significant drops I contributions because of fears of prosecution.

Jury finds US-based Muslim charity guilty of funding terrorism

The leaders of what was once the largest Muslim charity in the United States were found guilty of acting as a front for Palestinian militants, in what was the largest terrorism financing prosecution in American history. The now-defunct Holy Land Foundation is charged with funneling $12 million to Hamas.

The Holy Land Foundation is one of several Muslim organizations shut down by the Bush administration in the wake of the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks. The charity’s leaders received guilty verdicts, and received a total of 108 charges of providing material support to terrorists, money laundering, and tax fraud. Prosecutors did not accuse the charity of being directly involved or financing terrorist activity, but charged that humanitarian aid was used to promote Hamas, and allowed it to divert existing funds for militant activities.

Muslim charities in the United States have suffered a significant drop in contributions following 9/11, with many Muslim Americans concerned that they will be sought after for their good intentions of giving.

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ACLU Challenges Government’s Stigmatizing Of Mainstream Muslim Groups In Holy Land Case

The ACLU and its Texas chapter filed a legal challenge to clear the names of two Muslim organizations that have been labeled by the government as unindicated co-conspirators. The two organizations — The Islamic Society of North America and the North American Islamic Trust have been identified by the government for their association with the Holy Land Foundation – though neither organization has been the subject of a criminal investigation of charged with any crimes. “By publicly branding these groups as criminals without providing a forum for them to defend themselves or clear their names, the government has acted with blatant disregard for their constitutional rights,” said Hina Shamsi, an ACLU staff member.

Weak case seen in failed trial of charity; Muslim relief group was shut based on charges that ended in mistrial.

While the U.S. Justice Department ponders how it will retry its troubled terrorism finance case against a now- defunct Muslim charity, debris from the recent mistrial here shows signs of piling up at the White House doorstep. The nation’s biggest terrorism finance case ended so badly for the government that it has thrown into question the Bush administration’s original order to shut down the Holy Land Foundation for Relief and Development six years ago. Back then, President Bush accused the charity of aiding Palestinian terrorists. But similar allegations presented by federal prosecutors during the two-month trial in the president’s home state fell dramatically short of convincing a Texas jury…

Fear Used Against Muslim Charity

Against heavy odds, the American justice system has prevailed once again. After 19 days of deliberation, a jury in Dallas did not return even one guilty verdict on almost 200 charges brought against officials of the Holy Land Foundation Muslim charity. This marked the third time that government prosecutors failed to win a conviction in a high- profile case related to charges of support for terrorism by members of the American Muslim community. The prosecution laid out a bizarre theory that HLF, by sending money to feed orphans in Palestine, was freeing up funds that were then used to pay for acts of terror.

U.S. Prosecution of Muslim Group Ends in Mistrial

DALLAS, Oct. 22 – A federal judge declared a mistrial on Monday in what was widely seen as the government’s flagship terrorism-financing case after prosecutors failed to persuade a jury to convict five leaders of a Muslim charity on any charges, or even to reach a verdict on many of the 197 counts. The case, involving the Holy Land Foundation for Relief and Development and five of its backers, is the government’s largest and most complex legal effort to shut down what it contends is American financing for terrorist organizations in the Middle East. President Bush announced he was freezing the charity’s assets in December 2001, saying that the radical Islamic group Hamas had obtained much of the money it pays for murder abroad right here in the United States.

Mistrial Declared in Islamic Charity Case; Jurors Find No Proof That Donations Indirectly Aided Militant Hamas

The trial against what was once the nation’s largest Islamic charity ended in a mistrial Monday as federal prosecutors in Dallas were unable to gain a conviction on charges that the group’s leaders had funneled millions of dollars to Mideast terrorists. The jurors in the high-profile case acquitted Mohammad el-Mezain, the former chairman of the Holy Land Foundation for Relief and Development, on virtually all the charges brought against him and deadlocked on the other charges that had been lodged against four other former leaders of the charity…