Three terror suspects extradited

Three Tunisian men wanted in Italy for alleged terrorist offences have been extradited from Britain, police say. Habib Ignaoua, Mohamed Khemiri, and Ali Chehidi were arrested in 2007 on a European Arrest Warrant. Italian authorities accuse the trio of recruiting young men to join the jihad in Afghanistan and Iraq. In July, they went to the High Court to try to block their extradition on the grounds they could face torture, but the judges rejected their case. The Metropolitan Police all three left Britain at 1500 GMT on Saturday. The Italian authorities say the men were involved in recruiting fighters between 1997 and 1999.

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Spain acquits 14 accused Islamists

The Spanish Supreme Court overturned convictions against 15 of the 20 men accused of forming an Islamist group plotting to blow up Madrid’s High Court. The ruling found “non-existent the crime of conspiracy to commit a deadly terrorist attack.” Convictions for five of the men were upheld. Thirty suspects were originally arrested four years ago, most of whom were from Algeria and Morocco.

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Netherlands hands extremist suspect to Spain

The Netherlands extradited Pakistani national Akeel Abassi to Spain, where he faces allegations of belonging to an extremist Islamic group. Abassi fled spain in January following the dismantling of a group of militants in Barcelona. Authorities say the man traveled from Spain to Germany to carry out a suicide attack, but left for Netherlands without carrying out such actions. Abassi is one of eleven Islamists charged by Spain’s High Court in June.

Yusuf Islam accepts libel award

Yusuf Islam, the singer-songwriter formerly known as Cat Stevens, accepted substantial libel damages and an apology for articles that claimed he was sexist and bigoted, lawyers said. London’s High Court was told the World Entertainment News Network news agency and an entertainment web site, contactmusic.com, agreed to pay “substantial damages” for allegations made about him at an awards ceremony in Germany. The articles, published in March last year, falsely claimed he had refused to speak to or even acknowledge any women who were not veiled and was not prepared to speak to women other than through an intermediary, Islam’s lawyer said. Adam Tudor said his client was caused “considerable embarrassment and distress” at the allegations, which had created an “utterly false impression of his attitude to women” and cast aspersions on his faith. “In fact, Mr Islam has never had any difficulties working with women, whether for religious or for any other reasons. Women feature among some of the most influential people in his professional team,” he added.

“All of the damages secured by Mr Islam will be paid to his charity, Small Kindness. The defendants have also agreed to pay Mr Islam’s legal costs.” A spokeswoman for law firm Carter-Ruck told AFP that no details of the exact award would be made public.

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Yusuf Islam wins damages for ‘veiled women’ slur

Yusuf Islam, the singer-songwriter formerly known as Cat Stevens, has accepted substantial libel damages and an apology for articles that claimed he was sexist and bigoted. London’s High Court was told the World Entertainment News Network news agency and an entertainment website contactmusic.com agreed to pay “substantial damages” for allegations made about him at an awards ceremony in Germany. The articles, published in March last year, falsely claimed he had refused to speak to or even acknowledge any women who were not veiled and was not prepared to speak to women other than through an intermediary, his lawyer said. As Cat Stevens, Islam, 59, recorded several major hits in the late 1960s and 1970s. He converted to Islam at the height of his fame in 1977, devoting himself to education and philanthropy.

Yusuf Islam accepts libel award

Yusuf Islam, the singer-songwriter formerly known as Cat Stevens, accepted substantial libel damages and an apology for articles that claimed he was sexist and bigoted, lawyers said. London’s High Court was told the World Entertainment News Network news agency and an entertainment web site, contactmusic.com, agreed to pay “substantial damages” for allegations made about him at an awards ceremony in Germany. The articles, published in March last year, falsely claimed he had refused to speak to or even acknowledge any women who were not veiled and was not prepared to speak to women other than through an intermediary, Islam’s lawyer said. Adam Tudor said his client was caused “considerable embarrassment and distress” at the allegations, which had created an “utterly false impression of his attitude to women” and cast aspersions on his faith. “In fact, Mr Islam has never had any difficulties working with women, whether for religious or for any other reasons. Women feature among some of the most influential people in his professional team,” he added. “All of the damages secured by Mr Islam will be paid to his charity, Small Kindness. The defendants have also agreed to pay Mr Islam’s legal costs.” A spokeswoman for law firm Carter-Ruck told AFP that no details of the exact award would be made public.

Abu Hamza fighting extradition

Radical “cleric” Abu Hamza has launched a High Court battle against extradition to the US to face terror charges. He is wanted for allegedly trying to set up an al-Qa’ida training camp in Oregon. He is also claimed to have helped the gang who kidnapped Western tourists in Yemen in 1998, killing three Britons. But his lawyers are arguing extradition should be blocked because evidence gained by torture was being used against him. They also claim it would be “unjust and oppressive” to extradite because of the passage of time and it would be incompatible with his human rights. Egyptian-born Hamza, 49, is taking part in the hearing via a video link from Belmarsh top security prison, where he is serving a seven-year term for inciting followers – including the July 7 London bombers – to murder “non-believers”.http://themuslimweekly.com/newsdetails/fullstoryview.aspx?NewsID=D49FC2038014332034DE870C&MENUID=HOMENEWS&DESCRIPTION=UK%20News

Al Qaeda leader may stand trial again for financing Islamist terrorism while in jail

According to evidence compiled by High Court Judge Ismael Moreno, Imad Eddin Barakat, the convicted leader of a Spanish Al Qaeda cell, did not stop financing Islamic terrorism even after he was imprisoned in November of 2001. Barakat is a Syrian-born Spanish citizen who is currently serving a 12-year sentence for being a member of a terrorist organization, but may stand trial again over alleged payments while he was in prison, which investigators claim went to finance terrorist projects. Judge Moreno claims that Barakat, along with two others, used relatives to an owned real estate firm of its assets, cashing checks worth 2.4 million EUR; Moreno argues that some of that money ended up in the hands of terrorist groups.

Judge says Al Qaeda suspects unfit for trial

Spain has dropped the extradition of two British residents formerly held as terrorist suspects in Guantanamo Bay. High Court judge Baltasar Garzon shelved the case of two inmates in after medical reports from British authorities declared them to be unfit to stand trial after suffering years of abuse and torture, according to their lawyers. The pair, Jamil el-Banna and Omar Deghayes, were accused of belonging to a Spanish cell of al Qaeda, but their lawyers say that el-Banna had never been to Spain and Deghayes had suffered a case of mistaken identity.

British Muslim’s control order quashed

A control order restricting the movements of a British convert to Islam has been quashed. MI5 alleged the order was still necessary because there was a “reasonable suspicion” that Cerie Bullivant, 25, planned to travel to Iraq or Afghanistan to engage in terrorist activity.But at London’s High Court, Mr Justice Collins quashed the order after ruling: “There is no reasonable suspicion that establishes that.” Lawyers for Bullivant, from Dagenham, Essex, had argued the accusations were “baseless”, and that he was the victim of an abuse of power. Bullivant said the order had taken him down to “the depths of despair”.