Switzerland to Muslim Students: Shake Your Teacher’s Hand or Pay $5,000

25 May 2016

When two teenage Muslim students from Syria told their school in Switzerland that to shake their female teacher’s hand would violate their religious beliefs, administrators were sympathetic. So they made an exception: Unlike the school’s other students, who shake each teacher’s hand at the beginning and end of each class period, the two boys would be exempt from shaking anyone’s hand at all.

Turns out the Swiss national government takes their handshakes seriously. So seriously, in fact, that a regional authority announced Wednesday that the two boys would shake their female teachers’ hands from now on — or pay a $5,000 fine.  The local education department in Therwil, which is near the city of Basel, said in a statement Wednesday that the final decision was made because “the public interest with respect to equality between men and women and the integration of foreigners significantly outweighs the freedom of religion.”

This came after the citizenship process for the teens’ family was halted due to the incident. Authorities are now looking into their father’s 2001 asylum claim. He is an imam.

Last month, Swiss Justice Minister Simonetta Sommaruga went on television to say that “the handshake is part of our culture.”

“We cannot accept this in the name of religious freedom,” she said.

There are roughly 350,000 Muslims in Switzerland, and it’s unclear whether other exceptions were quietly made before this one. It’s also unclear what the two boys will do next. In an interview with Swiss media, one said they “could not just delete [their] culture as if it were a hard drive.”

Teachers complain woman refuses to shake hands

An administrative worker at the School for Journalism in Utrecht has sparked resentment among some teachers. The woman, who greets male teachers with a hand over her heart rather than shaking hands, has been working at the position since September. Some teachers have lodged a complaint regarding the practice. Trajectum quotes teacher Michiel Smis saying he feels discriminated: “Purely because of the fact that I’m a man she refused to shake my hand.”

Désirée Majoor, head of the Communication and Journalism Faculty, says in response that the employee reported her behavior regarding men before her job interview. She is well qualified for the position and has a pleasant and open attitude. “There is no issue here that she avoids contact. She only chooses to greet men differently. That does not impede her functioning.”